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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 03-14-2010, 10:18 AM
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I gotta pump the oil out of my push mower.. it uses a second deck underneath, which covers up the accessibility to the drain plug on the engine.

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 03-14-2010, 01:42 PM
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the compressors we used on the boats used non detergent 30 wt , the detergent causes the rings and valves to coke up and the comprressor doesn't get hot enough to boil off the water vapor and when that combines with some of the detergents it makes a acid in the crankcase .
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Old 03-16-2010, 09:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smithkustoms
BONUS QUESTION: My compressor has a 80 gallon tank but only has a 3/8" outlet. The 3/8" threaded outlet is on a large (3-4") screw in plug like most compressors have. Can I drill and tap the 3/8" hole in the pulg for a larger 1/2" or 3/4" outlet? Or anyone know where I could buy a plug with a larger outlet?
In theory you can dill & tap it but... Don't mess it up. In theory you could drill it, get a tap in, but have the tap fly across the room when you first use it. That would scare me slightly, but I'm particularly bad at that kind of thing. My main concern would be how to do it AND withstand whatever pressure is in the tank on an ongoing basis without anything breaking or leaking. Changing the size of the plug (converter) should be trivial if that's all you want.

Good luck.

Marquita Jensen
Bristol Compressors Comercial air compressors
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2010, 10:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smithkustoms
BONUS QUESTION: My compressor has a 80 gallon tank but only has a 3/8" outlet. The 3/8" threaded outlet is on a large (3-4") screw in plug like most compressors have. Can I drill and tap the 3/8" hole in the pulg for a larger 1/2" or 3/4" outlet?
If what you now have is actually 3/8 NPT, that IS large. If you're not familiar w/the NPT sizing (and skip this if you are), it's different than 'regular' threads like NC and NF.

What most guys will look at and call a 1/4" pipe thread is actually a 1/8 NPT. Same thing all the way up- the NPT size is numerically smaller than the size of the tap would lead you to believe.

That said, if you need to go larger than 3/8 NPT, the next up is 1/2 NPT. It's big. 3/4 NPT is BIG!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Marquita
In theory you could drill it, get a tap in, but have the tap fly across the room when you first use it. That would scare me slightly, but I'm particularly bad at that kind of thing. My main concern would be how to do it AND withstand whatever pressure is in the tank on an ongoing basis without anything breaking or leaking.
I'm puzzled about the highlighted comment above.

What I believe smithkustoms is suggesting, is to drill out and tap for a larger diameter outlet. The hole would be drilled w/the proper bit for the NPT tap to be used to cut the threads, then the larger diameter pipe fitting would be screwed into the new hole. There should be zero reason to "have the tap fly across the room when you first use it".

Maybe you're confusing "tap" for a type of fitting, as opposed to the tool that cuts threads?
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Old 03-16-2010, 11:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smithkustoms
Do air compressor pumps use a special oil, Or normal motor oil?
If motor oil, Would their be any benefits or issues with the use of synthetics such as Mobil-1? And What weight is best to use?
My Sanborn compressor manual specifically said to use synthetic 10 W 30 oil in the pump. I just bought a generic synthetic, and it has worked fine.
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Old 03-16-2010, 02:04 PM
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The manual for my Campbell Hausfeld suggests either compressor oil or 10w30 synthetic. Running the synthetic because it's easier to get.
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Old 03-18-2010, 01:03 AM
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Unless you happen to have a large drill of the correct size and a 1/2 or 3/4 pipe tap laying around, it'd be a lot cheaper to go to a plumbing and piping supply house and buy a bushing of the dimensions you need. The current plug is probably either 1 1/2, 2, or 2 1/2" pipe on the OD. Bushings are widely available with any of those OD threads and most any ID pipe thread you could want.

Even if it has to be double bushed to get to the size you want, $10 or so should cover the bill. A decent quality 1/2" NPT tap and the corresponding drill is going to cost you at least 3X that much in import stuff, and $50 or more for domestic tooling.

One problem with attempting to drill and tap an existing fitting is that a lot of fittings on the market today are really poor quality from a metallurgical standpoint. Some of the worst are fittings used in high volume production products where cost rules over all else. You might be able to drill and tap the fitting you have, or you might rip the end off a $20 drill in finding out the fitting has hard spots in it.
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 03-18-2010, 01:07 AM
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Yes, getting the correct size bushing was my recommendation also. That really is the best way to go.
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Old 03-18-2010, 04:45 AM
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Wrong post, my bad.
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 03-23-2010, 12:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 65ELCMO
I'm a retired compressor mechanic. We had a compressor manufacturer do a oil test and 30 w non detergent come out just the same as compressor oil. Don't worry about it being clear or looking like motor oil. Get the cheep stuff from checker etc. works just fine. If it runs all day you should change it every 3 months. Home owner, once a year is good.

x2... I'm not a compressor mechanic, I agree with you though.
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