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Old 06-09-2014, 09:56 AM
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orange peel ?

Hello guys ...I just sprayed my trans am over the weekend at home ..I have gotton some orange peel. .I used urethane base cost clear system ..3 coats of metalic base and 3 coats of clear ..the clear has some orange peel..what a good polishing compound ?or what will I need as far as polish , compound and buffing wheel pad to fix this problem..advice is appreciated

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Old 06-09-2014, 02:50 PM
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well if the orange peel is bad you will have to sand the entire car down till the clear is flat. and if its really bad you may have to re-clear the entire car again.

orange peel on an entire car is a pita to fix. But its simple to do just time consuming. I just sand flat and polish.
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Old 06-09-2014, 04:36 PM
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Originally Posted by taizer View Post
well if the orange peel is bad you will have to sand the entire car down till the clear is flat. and if its really bad you may have to re-clear the entire car again.

orange peel on an entire car is a pita to fix. But its simple to do just time consuming. I just sand flat and polish.
I wet sanded a test spot then used meguiars ulta cut compound then used there ultra polishing compound ..it seams to me its still alittle hazy
.what am I doing wrong
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Old 06-09-2014, 04:55 PM
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This what I started with ..iam not a pro at this .but it dont seam that bad ..
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Old 06-09-2014, 07:04 PM
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thats pretty bad
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Old 06-09-2014, 09:57 PM
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What grits are you using to sand the clear down, start to finish? Are you using a rotary buffer? I would probably start with 1200 grit on a hard block to level the peel out then go to 1500, 2000, and 2500 all wet, all on a "soft block" to continue removing sanding scratches. With the 2500 final grit you should have no problem using the meguiars compounds on a rotary buffer to get the shine back without the haze. If you have trouble with hazing, it could either be you have sand scratches left that did not get sanded fine enough before you started buffing, OR you did not buff long enough with the cutting compound before trying to polish. The polish will do little more than remove the swirls from the cutting compound. The finish should be clear and smooth prior to using the polishing compound. If you want, you can buy some 3000 grit and 5000 grit Trizact pads for a DA and that will make buffing much faster for you, but can get expensive if you don't plan to do any more buffing on a regular basis. Also, I am basing my recommendations on the clear I use and I how much I put on the panels. You can adapt these recommendations to what you feel comfortable with. Also remember that you will never buff out OP, it has to be sanded out. A buffer only adds shine, sanding fixes the problems. This is a golf cart I recently finished for a customer after sanding and buffing ( I use the chemical guys V-series compounds) this is a decent finish, but keep in mind it is a golf cart and the customer did not want it perfect. I would have worked for a little more clarity and depth if it were a customers car, but for a golf cart it is not too bad.



Kelly
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Old 06-09-2014, 09:58 PM
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With that much peel it would likely be easier and more durable if you knocked the gloss off with P600 (being careful not to break through to the base), clean, then apply more clear. However, before you do that it would be good to learn why you had so much peel the first time. I would send those photos to your paint supplier and ask for some advice.
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Old 06-09-2014, 10:05 PM
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Will (thecoatingstore) has a good point. I would guess either not enough fluid, too much air pressure, or too fast of a activator reducer could have caused this, but without more information on products used, conditions when sprayed, equipment used, experience level etc, I am purely guessing at the most common reasons.

Kelly
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Old 06-10-2014, 04:31 AM
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My first coat of clear went on really nice ..even the second coat also .but tge third for some reason didnt.iam not a pro .this is my first paint job.i wet sanded with 800 then 1500 then 2000..until it was flat until m seen no more dots ..it is a eace car so iam not looking for showroom quality but I should see myself in the clear. I think it needs more work ill post a pic of the hood left side was done .
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Old 06-10-2014, 04:33 AM
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Left side was done
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Old 06-10-2014, 05:04 AM
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Originally Posted by carolinacustoms View Post
What grits are you using to sand the clear down, start to finish? Are you using a rotary buffer? I would probably start with 1200 grit on a hard block to level the peel out then go to 1500, 2000, and 2500 all wet, all on a "soft block" to continue removing sanding scratches. With the 2500 final grit you should have no problem using the meguiars compounds on a rotary buffer to get the shine back without the haze. If you have trouble with hazing, it could either be you have sand scratches left that did not get sanded fine enough before you started buffing, OR you did not buff long enough with the cutting compound before trying to polish. The polish will do little more than remove the swirls from the cutting compound. The finish should be clear and smooth prior to using the polishing compound. If you want, you can buy some 3000 grit and 5000 grit Trizact pads for a DA and that will make buffing much faster for you, but can get expensive if you don't plan to do any more buffing on a regular basis. Also, I am basing my recommendations on the clear I use and I how much I put on the panels. You can adapt these recommendations to what you feel comfortable with. Also remember that you will never buff out OP, it has to be sanded out. A buffer only adds shine, sanding fixes the problems. This is a golf cart I recently finished for a customer after sanding and buffing ( I use the chemical guys V-series compounds) this is a decent finish, but keep in mind it is a golf cart and the customer did not want it perfect. I would have worked for a little more clarity and depth if it were a customers car, but for a golf cart it is not too bad.



Kelly
Yes kelly iam using a rotary buffer.i started using 800 to flatten it and 1500 2000 to polish it ..I went over the area again with 2000 and it came out better but the shine is fully acheived..I dont think iam sanding long enough with the finer grits...tonight iam going to try again
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Old 06-10-2014, 09:45 AM
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Another thing that will make it easier on you sanding is to step up to each grit instead of skipping from 800 to 1500, I would start with 1000 or 1200, then go to 1500, then 2000. You can save some time buffing by using 2500 as a final grit, but if you are getting the 2000 grit marks out with the compound it is not necessary. As a general rule, you need to get it as flat as you want with the coarse paper and a hard block (becareful on the round areas and stay back from the edges a little because the paint will naturally be thinner on those areas) then spend twice as much time with the next grit on a soft block to get the previous grit scratches out. I use a squeegee to dry the panel from time to time to watch for progress. Another tip that will help some, is to sand in opposite directions with each grit. Sand ///// with on grit then \\\\\ with the next. You can dry the panel and see exactly where you are this way. Once you get to the final grit, and are sure you are done sanding, you can start with the compound to remove the sanding scratches. Buff following the compound directions (each one will be a little different on speed recommendations, amount used, etc) until the shine comes back again being careful on the rounded surfaces and edges. Buff away from the edges to avoid burning through. In other words, have the buffing pad turning in a position so it going off the edge instead of towards it. When you think you have the panel cut, wipe it down with a clean microfiber towel and inspect it for scratches or hazing. If there is any left, go back over it with the compound until all the sanding scratches are gone, then you are ready for the polishing compound to remove any swirls from the cutting compound and to increase clarity.

I understand you aren't looking for a perfect finish, but you can learn a lot from this and be better prepared if you ever do a paint job in the future that you want to have a show room shine

Kelly
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Old 06-10-2014, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by carolinacustoms View Post
Another thing that will make it easier on you sanding is to step up to each grit instead of skipping from 800 to 1500, I would start with 1000 or 1200, then go to 1500, then 2000. You can save some time buffing by using 2500 as a final grit, but if you are getting the 2000 grit marks out with the compound it is not necessary. As a general rule, you need to get it as flat as you want with the coarse paper and a hard block (becareful on the round areas and stay back from the edges a little because the paint will naturally be thinner on those areas) then spend twice as much time with the next grit on a soft block to get the previous grit scratches out. I use a squeegee to dry the panel from time to time to watch for progress. Another tip that will help some, is to sand in opposite directions with each grit. Sand ///// with on grit then \\\\\ with the next. You can dry the panel and see exactly where you are this way. Once you get to the final grit, and are sure you are done sanding, you can start with the compound to remove the sanding scratches. Buff following the compound directions (each one will be a little different on speed recommendations, amount used, etc) until the shine comes back again being careful on the rounded surfaces and edges. Buff away from the edges to avoid burning through. In other words, have the buffing pad turning in a position so it going off the edge instead of towards it. When you think you have the panel cut, wipe it down with a clean microfiber towel and inspect it for scratches or hazing. If there is any left, go back over it with the compound until all the sanding scratches are gone, then you are ready for the polishing compound to remove any swirls from the cutting compound and to increase clarity.

I understand you aren't looking for a perfect finish, but you can learn a lot from this and be better prepared if you ever do a paint job in the future that you want to have a show room shine

Kelly
Thank u kelly .u have been a great help .I will do excatly that..ill post pics after iam done to see of it looks ok...thank u again
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Old 06-10-2014, 10:57 AM
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guys you need to learn this so you don't have peel in the first place.. At least a lot less peel to deal with..

Adjusting Your Gun

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Old 06-10-2014, 08:02 PM
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There are so many reasons why you would get peel in the first place, gun adjustment is the most common. But it could also be as simple as gun distance to panel (to far away) or even gun speed across the panels. Point is even if the gun is dialed in your distance and speed play a BIG part as well.
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