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Old 10-26-2011, 05:50 AM
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Oxygen regulator converted to air regulator

I need ANOTHER air regulator for my compressor,I have 4-5 oxygen regulators laying around at the shop and was wondering if if theres any reason it wouldnt work if I just changed out the fittings....Due to to higher oxygen tank pressures it seems like it might work even better...any reason I should'nt try it ???? my tank pressure is at 180 psi

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Old 10-26-2011, 06:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deadbodyman
I need ANOTHER air regulator for my compressor,I have 4-5 oxygen regulators laying around at the shop and was wondering if if theres any reason it wouldnt work if I just changed out the fittings....Due to to higher oxygen tank pressures it seems like it might work even better...any reason I should'nt try it ???? my tank pressure is at 180 psi
It would be interesting to know if it would work. They are built alot heavier than air regulators so I'm fairly sure they would take the pressure. I think the outlet side is only adjustable from 0-100 psi but that is still more than most air tools require.
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Old 10-26-2011, 06:55 AM
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Bang- Boom

The problem would be if you ever switched it back or some day when we are all gone. and at the Estate sale some one buys it and uses it on an Oxygen Tank , The Oil contamination could cause an explosion. Check out Welding Tips and Tricks web Site He has info and video/s From the Smith welding equipment Co showing some exploded regulators.
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Old 10-26-2011, 07:11 AM
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Bad Idea, see reasons above. Also unless it is a two stage type it probably will not work very well at the low inlet pressures you will be working with from the compressor, even a two stage type regulator may not work very well at that low of an inlet pressure, besides a working two regulator is worth too much to destroy for something like this. Then there is the problem of restriction, those things are not designed to provide the volume needed to run most air tools or paint guns so it might be too limited to be of much use. If you try this anyway then modify that thing so that it can NEVER be used for Oxygen service again! I would suggest drilling out the fitting holes to accept standard pipe fittings larger than the factory gas fittings, you would need the extra flow anyway, actually I would very strongly suggest just forgetting the whole idea!
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Old 10-26-2011, 07:20 AM
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too far away

If you lived closer I would give you a couple, I bought a heavy work table-fixture At the Ford Mustang Factory closing Yard sale when I lived in Calif. for $ 5, It had an air supply manifold with 4 air regulators.
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Old 10-31-2011, 06:49 PM
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I agree with OldRed, I don't think an oxygen regulator would flow as much volume as an air regulator. Also, the oxygen regulator probably would not have as high of working pressure on the output side as an air regulator would have.
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Old 11-01-2011, 06:35 AM
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Well I did it ,I swapped out the fittings and hooked it up...Your right ,cant get enough volume out of it....now I'm on a mission so I took it apart to find out why and what was different the first thing I found was a couple screens that needed to be removed and some cotton looking stuff..the diaphragm was about the same size but much heavier duty...digging deeper I found what I think is the reason ,very small inlet and outlet ports...it might be as simple as drilling them out to get more flow.

Reminds me of a joke about an elephant seeing a man taking a leak and asking him How the heck do you breath through that thing???

I cant imagine anyone else wanting to do this and you've come up with some things I haven't thought of like someone trying to put it back on a oxy tank ,I'll make sure that wont be possible...I 've had these extra regs around for years but cant seem to throw them out ,now I have something to play with at my desk while I'm waiting between coats of paint..I'll let yall know if drilling out the ports solves the problem ....BTW I already replaced my old reg with a new one so I dont really need one ,I just cant help myself from taking things apart and figuring out how they work ,I've always been this way, Mom says from birth...anyways it gives us something new to talk about that has never come up before...
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Old 11-01-2011, 08:52 AM
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Ah a man with determination and ingenuity! I think you will need to open the passages up to 1/4" minimum and then you will probably need to do something about that spring, it is designed for more than 10 times the inlet pressure at less than half the delivery pressure and is most likely way to strong. I am just speculating here as I have not done this nor ever seen anyone else do it and while I doubt it will be worth the effort I don't know that for sure and maybe it will! Actually since you have made sure no one will try to return it to Oxygen service I see no other downside except maybe it won't work very well but the maybe it will, good luck and let us know how it works.
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Old 11-01-2011, 06:57 PM
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Ahh, the spring I'll remember that if theres any trouble ...Well if it works I'll have a stand by if or when the new reg starts leaking or worse..seems like nothing lasts very long any more ....third regulator this year..
BTW Old Red whats the screens and cotton looking stuff for in the oxy reg ???? some kind of debris filter????
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Old 11-01-2011, 07:25 PM
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water gauges work on air

gauge is a gauge just follow pressure limits
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Old 11-01-2011, 10:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deadbodyman
whats the screens and cotton looking stuff for in the oxy reg ???? some kind of debris filter????
Yep.


I know this is supposed to be a no-no for torch use but I always dug out those confounded bronze screen/filters from regulators due to the restriction to the flow. When using a number 8, or even a number 6 cutting tip and cutting sections over a foot thick there simply was not enough volume. Also I hate a carbon arc torch (Air-Arc) with a passion and I used my big Victor and gauging tips instead, a no. 12 gouging tip will suck a big Oxygen tank dry PDQ and those screen/filters had to be removed for them to work properly also. I did that for many years and I never saw any problems resulting from doing so but still it's not recommended. I guess I probably should not even mention doing that because it is dangerous to modify a torch gauge and is something that should not be done.
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Old 04-20-2012, 09:42 PM
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I can say that an oxygen regulator would flow as much volume as an air regulator. Though the oxygen regulator probably would not have as high of working pressure on the output side as an air regulator.

SimplyGo Portable Oxygen
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Old 04-22-2012, 05:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
Yep.


I know this is supposed to be a no-no for torch use but I always dug out those confounded bronze screen/filters from regulators due to the restriction to the flow. When using a number 8, or even a number 6 cutting tip and cutting sections over a foot thick there simply was not enough volume. Also I hate a carbon arc torch (Air-Arc) with a passion and I used my big Victor and gauging tips instead, a no. 12 gouging tip will suck a big Oxygen tank dry PDQ and those screen/filters had to be removed for them to work properly also. I did that for many years and I never saw any problems resulting from doing so but still it's not recommended. I guess I probably should not even mention doing that because it is dangerous to modify a torch gauge and is something that should not be done.
You really needed to be running liquid O2 from the sounds of it.
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Old 04-27-2012, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Old Fool
You really needed to be running liquid O2 from the sounds of it.



Did just that, a lot of it! Sometimes it's kind of hard to get enough pressure from LO but over-all it works great and is a heck of a lot cheaper than compressed O2.

IMO those stinking Air-Arc carbon torches have caused more weld failures than any other reason except for improper weld technique. The problem is they leave the surface of the metal heavily contaminated with carbon to a depth as much as 1/16" and if every trace of this carbon is not removed by grinding it results in brittle welds. Using a grooving tip and Oxygen instead of these goofy contraptions eliminates this problem and leaves uncontaminated metal, it is however more expensive to use and requires a lot more skill but it's faster and does a lot better job.
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Old 04-28-2012, 06:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
Did just that, a lot of it! Sometimes it's kind of hard to get enough pressure from LO but over-all it works great and is a heck of a lot cheaper than compressed O2.

IMO those stinking Air-Arc carbon torches have caused more weld failures than any other reason except for improper weld technique. The problem is they leave the surface of the metal heavily contaminated with carbon to a depth as much as 1/16" and if every trace of this carbon is not removed by grinding it results in brittle welds. Using a grooving tip and Oxygen instead of these goofy contraptions eliminates this problem and leaves uncontaminated metal, it is however more expensive to use and requires a lot more skill but it's faster and does a lot better job.
Did you run direct off the tank or use an evaporator inline?
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