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Old 07-10-2008, 08:45 AM
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Packard 56 Terminal Crimper

I had an old crimper from Radio Shack that I used to crimp Packard 56 terminals before I soldered them. They did a nice job of making a good mechanical connection and the solder "sealed the deal".

Being a $10 tool purchased 20 years ago, it finally wore out, but the new version of it that Radio Shack sells will not accept a Packard 56 terminal (jaws aren't large enough, so it's no longer an option. Just crimping with pliers makes it difficult to push the crimped terminals into the housing since I can never get them squeezed small enough and the crimp always looks crappy . And since I also do some restoration work, I don't always have the option of switching to a different type of connector.

The pro-quality tools are $200+ and I'll get one if I have no other choice, but is anybody aware of a more sensibly priced crimper that can be used on Packard 56 terminals?

Hoyt

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Old 07-10-2008, 11:21 AM
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Ebay Ratcheting crimper - I picked this up and haven't looked back. Best $80 I've spent on electrical tools so far. I believe it's die #18922 that does that terminal type (Packard 56 & 59, Pack-Con II & III, Metripak's, etc.).

-Mike
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Old 07-10-2008, 11:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brimstone
Ebay Ratcheting crimper - I picked this up and haven't looked back. Best $80 I've spent on electrical tools so far. I believe it's die #18922 that does that terminal type (Packard 56 & 59, Pack-Con II & III, Metripak's, etc.).

-Mike
I can't tell from the picture - does this tool form the correct "heart-shaped" crimp?
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Old 07-10-2008, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe_padavano
I can't tell from the picture - does this tool form the correct "heart-shaped" crimp?
You mean where it bends the tabs in towards the center of the wire? In that case, then yes it does. Does both sets of tabs (the contact and the wire support) in one shot, too. I can take some pics when I get home tonight and post 'em up tomorrow if you're interested in better pics.
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Old 07-10-2008, 01:40 PM
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Napa part number 726-603. Thats in their Belden line. I use them for just about every roll style crimp I've needed. MSD also sells one. Part number is 35051.
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Old 07-11-2008, 10:11 AM
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I have no idea what a Packard 56 terminal is, but I use this tool (below) for most all of my crimps, in the car, on my job and on boats. It used to be about 20 bucks or so, and you can get it at HD.

Picture here: http://www.kleinconnection.com/Klein...bcat2-page.jpg
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Old 07-11-2008, 10:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesman2333
I have no idea what a Packard 56 terminal is, but I use this tool (below) for most all of my crimps, in the car, on my job and on boats. It used to be about 20 bucks or so, and you can get it at HD.

Picture here: http://www.kleinconnection.com/Klein...bcat2-page.jpg
Packard 56 is the terminal line used by GM during the 60s and 70s for virtually all of their wire harness connectors. A normal crimping tool for barrel type terminals will not crimp these correctly, causing distortion and preventing the terminal from fitting in the connector body.

http://order.waytekwire.com/IMAGES/M...og/220_036.pdf
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Old 07-11-2008, 10:50 AM
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Packard 56's are probably the most common terminal on older GM (at least) wiring. It's the 1/4" blade connector, either male or female - Used for stuff like back of gauge pods, tail light sockets, heater control, etc.

Packard 59's are the larger cousins of Packard 56's. Mainly used for headlight sockets and other high-draw applications.

Pack-Con II's are edge-connect type terminals. Used in the steering column harmonica connector, and some other places like wiper switch and such.

Pack-Con III's are the heavier-duty version of Pack-Con II's. Mainly used in the fuse panel itself to connect to the fuses.

More information: Automotive Electrical Connectors

- Mike
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Old 07-11-2008, 11:00 AM
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Wow, learn something new every day. I will be going through this is a couple of months. This thread just made my life a whole lot easier.
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Old 07-11-2008, 08:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brimstone
Ebay Ratcheting crimper - I picked this up and haven't looked back. Best $80 I've spent on electrical tools so far. I believe it's die #18922 that does that terminal type (Packard 56 & 59, Pack-Con II & III, Metripak's, etc.).

-Mike

I bought this today. Thanks!

Anybody be at the Syracuse Nats next week? Look me up at the StreetRodder booth.
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Old 08-07-2008, 01:03 PM
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This has been a really good thread. I just wanted to chime in and thank Brimstone for the referral. I ordered one of these a few days ago, recieved it Tuesday, and tried it out on Wednesday evening. The first crimp didn't come out correctly, because the terminal was not properly seated in the die set. Several other terminals, however, all came out beautifully. To my (unprofessional) eye, they look machine-made. This is a really nice tool. Thanks again, Brimstone.

Pat
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Old 08-08-2008, 10:31 AM
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Glad you like it! I know that there are larger sets out there that use the same pliers frame, but this kit contains almost all the dies that would be needed for an older-type electrical work (There is a die set specifically for spark plug wires that I had picked up as well). I mean some of the kits have like 20-some-odd jaw sets to cover everything from tel-com work (Cat-V/phone connectors), to cable co-ax to automotive to A/V connectors and probably more, but those are also significantly more expensive.

Enjoy!
- Mike
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