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Old 03-12-2008, 08:47 PM
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paint booth

hello
i just recently purchased my first home and on my way to start seting up my garage initially . im sure im not the first to ask about this but if anyone can point me in the right direction would help alot. i would like to build a home spray booth . i have seen some made of wood, framed up you know?, i know that fans need to be explosion proof for the overspray may ignite....... can you guys give me some ideas and thoughts ?

thanks

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Old 03-13-2008, 06:00 AM
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What kind of budget do you have? The main thing to remember is that airflow and filtration are the keys of a good spray booth. I don't know what you plan of spraying in there but if you want to do all overs(entire vehicles) you really need to move the air through so your solvents evaporate faster and you dont have overspray clouding up the booth. I put together a shop and we bought a cheap end draft booth for around $4,000.(over 7 years ago)
http://www.autobodytoolmart.com/c-959-paint-booths.aspx
check out these booths and they might give you some ideas.
lighting is also very important, remember that you want to have a smooth interior to the booth, if there is anything to cath air overspray will build up on it and cause alot of trash to show up in your paint work, with our booth you can wash it down with soap and water and a scrub broom. ABT also has booth parts for sale so maybe you could buy what you need as you construct your booth, i hope this helps, at least you can look at those booths and get an idea of sizes and airflow.
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Old 03-13-2008, 01:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StangSteve
.... im sure im not the first to ask about this but if anyone can point me in the right direction would help alot. i would like to build a home spray booth . ....thanks
You are correct. The questions has been asked many times before and there is tons of info on this site about building your own paint booth,

Use the search engine at the top of the page and type in - home made paint spray booth or homemade paint spray booth or paint spray booth. You will find enough info to keep you reading for several days. If you then have specific questions get back to us and the members will be better able to answer your specific questions.
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Old 03-16-2008, 06:56 PM
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thanks to both of you, i will research on here tonight then since i got back finally and i will get back if i have more questions
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Old 03-17-2008, 02:06 AM
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I'm going to type this up to put on my web site, so it will be like I'm not talking to you, just putting out an overview on how to build a home made paint booth.

Heres what it looks like. http://www.1969supersport.com/paintroom.html

Start by laying out some 2x4's on the floor, this will be your bottom plate, so were going to start with one wall, you allready have the outside wall of your garage.

Lay them flat where you want your wall in a line, one butted up against the other.

Hilty them down to your garage floor every few feet, good enough so they won't move, don't over do it.

Don't worry about the hilty holes if you decide to take the booth out, if you are, you can mortar the holes shut if your moving out permanently.

If you don't tell anybody about the hilty holes in the floor, most people wouldn't even notice them.

Build your wall panels on the floor, depending on how high your ceiling is, you want a half inch or so space between the top of your wall and the ceiling.

I'll explain why later.

I used 4'x 8' 7/16'' thick aspenite, smooth side facing the inside of the booth.

Cut some 2'' x 4''s and lay them on there side, then lay your 4 x 8 sheet of aspenite over it and glue and screw the panels to the 2'' x 4''s.

Only sheet one side, the studs will be showing on the side outside the booth.

Go to the back wall and stand your first panel up on top of your 2 x 4 plate on the floor.

Pre drill a couple of holes for lag screws to hold your wall section to the floor plate. Lag screw it down, now go the top of your wall section, and you should have about a 1/2'' gap between the top of your wall and the ceiling, it can be close to tight or an inch difference in the gap ,no big deal.

Now locate your stringers or trusses or rafters or whatever, and pre drill your upper wall into the ceiling trusses. two if you can get them in, don't forget to level your wall section before you lag screw it at the top.

Your not going to draw that top wall section to the ceiling, all your doing is putting a couple of lag screws in it to keep it from falling over.

Finish out your wall as long as you want it, mines around 25' long I think.

Now you have the wall in, and you have a gap at the top. Get some 1'' x 4''s or 1'' x 6''s and close off that gap, those are just screwed in also, nothing is nailed, so you can dissasemble all of it.

I layed them up, then put a couple of screws in them to hold them, then took a pencil and marked them, pulled them off and put a little bead of caulk just inside the pencil line, then screwed them down and the caulk squished out, and smoothed it off with my thumb.

Do the same to your bottom plate, also caulk the cracks in between the wall sections.

Then some cheap white latex paint on the inside and it will be water proof so you can hose it down if you want to.

I'm thinking with this, plus the paint room section, you should have a rough idea on how to do it.

I'm guessing, but I think I could dissasemble my paint booth in an hour with an air ratchet and stack it up and put in the back of a pickup.

Rob



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Last edited by robs ss; 03-17-2008 at 02:16 AM.
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Old 03-17-2008, 02:30 AM
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Steve, heres a thread on a negative pressure booth, its kind of a long thread, but saves me retyping all of it, I type the old two fingered way, kind of slow.

Its right at the start of this thread.
http://www.chevelles.com/forums/show...pressure+booth

We have painted a couple of cars and a bunch of motorcycles, and this setup works, anyway, hope some of this will help you out.

Rob

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Old 03-21-2008, 03:06 PM
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thanks for the help , sorry for the long delay i drive for a living , but i have read your posts awhile ago, im looking to start building something in about 2 weeks still finishing up moving in, thanks for the help i will let you know how things go soon . then i will ask some more detailed questions , thanks again
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Old 03-21-2008, 10:41 PM
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Your welcome Steve.

Rob

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Old 03-22-2008, 11:56 AM
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Spray booth

Fans don't need to be rated explosion proof, to be explosion proof.... I have some professional exposure to this subject. I worked as a elevator tech for Eastman Kodak Corp. for many years and many of their installations were very critical to any equipment that could cause explosion or fire. Explosion proof rating is a very hard to acheive rating in electrical equipment and can be very expensive for a guy building a spray booth. Explosion proof rating means, conduit (rigid) for all fixtures, switches must be sealed, all joints and hardware must have poured joints. It means that even the conduit itself cannot have any airspace where gas could accumulate and then cause fire. Anything that might cause a spark was verbotten.

In your case I would suggest that you use a two fan system, one exhaust and one intake. This would prevent any vapor build up inside that could cause a fire. Secondly the fan requirements should simply be BRUSHLESS MOTORS. This should solve that problem. Use a old 240 volt squirrel cage blower from an old furnace or Ac unit.

Unless you are going to install a complete explosion proof electrical system it would be foolish to worry about the fan motors. Mercury switches, and duplex recepticles and even light fixtures can create open sparks. Your best bet for saftey is to keep lots of air circulating through the booth. No vapor build up, no problem.

PS.... Don't be lighting a smoke after-- to stand back and admire your work! In this case the smoking lamp is NOT lit!
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Old 03-22-2008, 04:58 PM
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Hey Big Don,
Interesting timing on this as I spent about three hours today looking for explosion proof fans on line for the new buildings.

I'm required to move the air (cubic feet) four times pure hour and the fire code states "explosion proof". Now my question to you is, did any of these
fans pass the inspection of the fire Marshall in a hazardous area?
Do you know if they were permitted or just installed on the sly?

Thanks for all the info as interesting reading, for sure.
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Old 03-22-2008, 07:14 PM
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This site had a lot of information on fans.

http://www.jennyproducts.com/FanGuide.html

Aaron
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Old 03-24-2008, 07:27 PM
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Let's not lose sight of the fact that any evaporative substance with the ability to combust requires a minimum concentration in the air to reach its flash point. Don't think for a second that I am downplaying anyone's concerns about the risks involved or the precautions being taken to minimize those risks. It just seems that if you can move enough air through the area, the volatile compounds will never even come close to reaching flash point, making it a moot point to have explosion-proof equipment. My garage is 24x30x9 for a total of 6500 cubic feet. A high-velocity 24" floor fan will exchange that once a minute, which should easily keep fumes below the flash point. Besides, a true explosion-proof environment would be horrendously expensive for the average hobbyist.
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Old 03-24-2008, 08:19 PM
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another thing to think about is that you are not just trying to keep the vbapors from the flash point but also the pull air over the painted parts as this helps pull out the solvents and keeps overspray from falling back onto the fresh paint, both of which result in a better paint job.
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Old 03-25-2008, 01:06 AM
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The paint booth I have has very little air movement, when your spraying in there, you can barely see the guy spraying.

The less air moving through, the less chance for dirt problems.

A down draft would be nice with lots of air movement, but for a hobbist what ever works is sometimes the only way you can go.

I've found that when it comes time to put the base, clear on a car, go out and find a guy that paints every day, bring him in for a cash deal, have him bring his own spray gun, you will find that this overspray is a lot of hoopla, the paint jobs we do don't have dirt in them, and if any shows up its very minimal to almost non existent.

I know were getting overspray, but overspray does not effect the painting we do, it just doesn't matter.

Its all in the gun and who is using it, clear coat gets sanded and buffed, and a little overspray on the base, means nothing.

It sounds like I'm bragging here, and that isn't what I'm trying to say, I know for a fact, your not going to get a better paint job with a downdraft or good airflow anymore then you are in a booth with minimal air flow.

Its all in the prep and the painter.

As far as explosions in a paint booth, if a guy can afford an explosion proof fan, thats a good thing, but I run what the wallet can stand, and we get mega fumes in the booth, and I'm still here to tell about it.

While I'm still typing, I have talked before about a negative pressure booth with minimal air flow.

This means when my exhaust fan is on, and the entry door to the paint booth is open, if its only open about 2 or 3 inches, the exhaust fan will make the door close, if its open 4 or more inches, there isn't enough suction to close the door, this is a negative pressure booth.

Now you will here, that the way to go is a positive pressure booth, so your entry door will start to open a little when the fan or fans are on.

For a home hobbist, this is not the way to go, I'll explain.

Hobbist as a rule do there own body prep work, and some do there own painting, but this works for me.

If your going to paint a car, you need a runner or gopher, I'm sure some of you have jobs or have had jobs that you used a runner to help out, hand you tools or go get something. A good runner can make or break a job.

I'm getting to the point here.

With a negative pressure booth, your air right outside the booth is clear, you can step out and take a break or whatever. Your runner can mix your paint, you open the door and he can fill your spray cup, he's out of the fumes.

If theres a problem with something, your runner can help out, after all this prep work, now is the time that you want things as right as you can get them.

You yourself should be the runner, get a guy that paints every day with his spray gun, paint and clear is not cheap, you will probably only have to do it once with the right guy spraying.

We have only painted a few cars, but lots of motorcycles and other stuff. The cars that we painted came out absolutely beautifull, I don't know how to tell this with out sounding like I'm bragging, but there probably isn't any such thing as a perfect paint job, but they sure look like it, minimal air movement, mega fumes, can't hardly see the guy spraying, it just doesn't mean diddly squat, its all in the painter and the gun.

If you stop and think about what happens when your spraying something, right at the point where the paint hits the panel and so many pounds of air pressure behind it, this paint when it hits, is there some of this that blows out to the side when it hits the panel, or could you paint to a straight edge, I don't think so, then why would a lot of fumes from over spray effect a paint job when this is going on just before it.

If your using a respirator, it would be better to get the all the fumes out you can, but if you have supplied air it doesn't matter, and we do use supplied air.

Just my 2 cents for what its worth.

Rob

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Last edited by robs ss; 03-25-2008 at 01:22 AM.
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Old 03-25-2008, 04:54 AM
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I dont like to color sand and buff my stuff thats why I perfer to have alot of air movment, it also helps prevent solvent popping. You are right, there is no such thing as a perfect paint job, perfect in some minds is trash in anothers. Jusu my two cents.
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