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Old 03-18-2006, 02:09 PM
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Paint prep with exposed bondo

I'll try to be as to the point as possible... I have painted my rig with etching primer. Had a misshap had to do some minor repairs.

I wanted to put a second coat of primer on. Its been several months since tha last coat. Keep in mind this is a working project..a jeep to be exact. I need to rinse the dust off of the rest so I can coat the whole thing at once. Will the water hurt the exposed bondo? Should I paint the bondo first. then prep wash? I have been stipping the paint & then painting with primer. As I can only work on this once a month it has been a process to get stripped.

Thanks SC

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Old 03-18-2006, 04:24 PM
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Water will not hurt the bondo...There are even times to wet sand bondo and putties... ... Here is a favorite thread from years back showing how wet bondo can help the eye see if it's straight.

http://www.a2zautoforums.com/showthread.php?t=936





.
.If metal is a factor have some Rustmort* handy and spritz it into the process as you go...Phosphoric acid based rust removers question

Last edited by milo; 03-18-2006 at 04:34 PM.
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Old 03-18-2006, 05:03 PM
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Thanks Milo, I had read your thread several times. Just wanted to make sure on the washing. Since I had to use a chemical paint stripper I thought I might have some isues. I used a degreaser on the cowel where I stripped the paint this weekend. I was going to wash this area & the rest with soapy water, & try to just use straight water where the bondo is exposed.

Thanks again!
SC
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Old 03-18-2006, 05:07 PM
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Filler will absorb water, so give it lots of dry time before putting anything on top of it!
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Old 03-18-2006, 10:46 PM
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I am sorry but there is NO reason, NONE , ZERO to EVER put water on plastic filler. And certainly not to "see if it is straight". Milo, Milo, Milo, what are you thinking???

Plastic filler WILL absorb water, call the Evercoat tech department and find out. There is NO reason to wet sand it, there is no reason to get it wet PERIOD. This isn't my opinion, this is the standard of the industry NO ONE that I have ever seen in HUNDREDS of body shops I have been in would think this is a good idea. Milo, I know you can take it, or I would't lay into you this way. As crashtech said, sure you could let it dry out. But why get it wet in the first place? I don't want to see anyone doing such a thing. IF, you have found it to "work", that is fine and dandy, rock on with your bad self. But it goes against EVERYTHING I have ever read or understood about the product. PLUS, there is NO reason, NONE , ZERO to EVER put water on plastic filler.

Listen SC, run over the thing with a red scuff pad, blow it off and prime it for goodness sakes. This is primer, if there is some dust in it, or what have you, it is no big deal. It IS going to be sanded later, "surfaced", anyway. A few bits of dust isn't going to hurt a thing. If you have to, wipe it with a fast, weak, wax and grease remover. But unless your kid sprayed WD-40 all over the shop or you sanded it while eating a bacon cheese burger, there is no need for that either.

Brian

P.S. Did I mention that there is NO reason, NONE , ZERO to EVER put water on plastic filler?
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Old 03-18-2006, 11:10 PM
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Thanks fo rthe input guys...This is why I asked the question. Just did'nt want to do something that would cause the final paint job to go bad.
Like I stated before, I have had to strip the paint with chemical stripper in sections.

I think I've got it now. Just need to maker sure there is no grease, wax etc. before the color goes on.

Thanks again!
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Old 03-19-2006, 12:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR
Milo, Milo, Milo, what are you thinking???

Did I mention that there is NO reason, NONE , ZERO to EVER put water on plastic filler?
I'm thinking how water helps keep dust out of the air I'm breathing while enjoying a hobby to it's fullest. I do enjoy the contrasting schools I'll admit hence keeping it a hobby and a show for the hometown fans ..

That and helping CJ882 get his project on to it's next stage. He was asking about water on his bondo and would it hurt it. It won't.

Now moisture is another thing,

Of course a panel shouldn't sit out in even air overnight. Water isn't the problem though. They even make water based paints. I look forward to operations I can use water to prevent headaches from fumes or dusts. More so than for any benifit to the actual process i.e.keeping sand paper from loading and what ever other side effect it does add including viewing reflections whilste splashing h20..

If we can smell it we're doing it wrong.. it's too much and needs to be controled or managed somehow if we want to do it a lot.

When they hoist sunken treasure it's kept safe in water..
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Old 03-19-2006, 09:38 AM
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Your argument is like the guy at work who doesn't want to use weld thru primer because he has a hard time welding while using it. The solution isn't to skip the weld thru primer, the solution is to learn how to weld!

I have seen a lot of guys who will make a lot more dust while sanding filler than other guys.

1. Use the best, sharpest paper you can buy. The more you CUT the filler the larger the particles will be and they will fall to the floor instead of flying around.

2. Use the coarsest paper you can for each step. Again, the particles stay larger and fall to the floor.

3. Change your paper often! Do NOT hit the paper, blow off the paper, or any other damn thing to knock dust into the air. Simply TEAR THE CLOGGED PAPER OFF THE TOOL AND THROW IT AWAY! It isn't cutting worth a darn anyway if it is getting clogged up! Change to NICE NEW, SHARP paper to CUT the filler instead of "polishing" it.

4. Use the "Emory Robinson method" I lay out in the "Basics of Basics". With a use of this procedure you can do just about any filler job in two applications. One in regular filler that you sand with 40 or 36 (large particles) and two with polyester putty (sanded with 120 and 180). Applying filler over and over will make more dust than anything else.

Sure it creates dust, but THAT is part of the job. If you want to eliminate dust, metal finish everything. I must admit, you can do this on many jobs. But in the real world you are going to have to use filler in shop. Use it properly and you will have much less dust.

Brian
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Old 03-19-2006, 09:55 AM
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Martin is a 100% right.

Also it was noted:

"I had to use paint striper."
If that means your leaving body filler that has been exposed to paint striper your in deep trouble. You cannot neutralize the stripper that the body filler soaked up.
That body filler must come off.

One other note even if you let the wet body filler set for a week, it is very unlikely that all the water will come out. That is just crazy.

Last edited by BarryK; 03-19-2006 at 10:11 AM.
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Old 03-19-2006, 10:39 AM
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BarryK, thanks for your input. The bondo was & is free of any contaminates. I mentioned the stripper because I had read that this area needs to be washed after the grease & wax remove had been applied.

Thanks

SC
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Old 04-16-2006, 09:34 PM
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Primer coating?

I have another question moving forward with my project. I have coated the entire body with etching primer as recomended to me by the local body shop.

I am entertaining the idea of painting the whole thing myself now. My question is should I paint over the etching primer with epoxy or some other type of primer before the base coat?

Another thing to keep in mind is that it may be a month or two before I paint the base coat. Meaning I may drive the jeep around the pasture some before I bring her to town to paint the base coat.

Thanks again for the input!

SC
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Old 04-16-2006, 09:46 PM
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CJ, check with your paint supplier if paint can be applied directly to the primer you are using, if possible have them print you a copy of the tech cheet for this primer and also the paint you'll be using. Many self etching primers cannot be painted over without using a sealer. I've seen clear delamination on jobs that were painted directly over self etch.
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Old 04-16-2006, 09:47 PM
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Your bodyshop may have caused you some work. First off, if you are going to use etching primer, it has a "window" prior to applying the next product on. In this case, if you want to apply epoxy primer over it, you could have done it within twenty minutes for up to as little as four hours to as much as 24 hours or maybe more depending on the particular brand or product.

Some may even need to be re-applied and can't even be sanded and top coated with something after a certain time.

What etch primer did you use?

As Bob mentioned some can be shot over with paint others can't. I have actually seen a LOT of S-W etch painted right over on trucks and trailers with great results.

You will likely be able to scuff this etch with a red scuff pad and then apply your epoxy OR my choice would be urethane at this point. The urethane is much easier to sand when it comes time for painting.

Brian
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Old 04-16-2006, 10:14 PM
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Brian, I do not remember the brand of primer I used as I threw the can away last week. I bought it at the local auto parts store. It had a one to one mix ratio.

Will the urethane primer seal against rust as well as the epoxy? May be a dumb question but I had rather ask than assume….and we all know what they say about assuming….


Thanks again
SC
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Old 04-16-2006, 10:40 PM
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Yes, at this point the urethane or epoxy are going to get the job done, they will both "seal" the etch primer off.

You should get the name of the etch, but I would say the odds are greatly in your favor that you could just scuff it with a red scuff pad and spray the urethane or epoxy.

Brian
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