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Old 11-16-2007, 05:08 PM
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Painting, getting cold... don't feel like blowing up

OK, I'm primering, and painting, just had the bottom, and sub frame blasted. I need to get this done before it starts to surface rust. Its getting cold, faster then I expected, but I do have a couple 60 degree days coming up. I have a paint booth, (pvc, clear tarps, and fans with filters) setup in my garage. My whole garage is insulated, except the door, and with my propane heater I can get it to 70 degrees pretty easy on a 55-60 degree day. Once I get it heated, then do some painting, I'm terrified to fire up the heater. I read in one of my painting books that fumes can be quite flammable, and it would really be a bummer to blow up the garage, and myself.

I also read, on some other threads, of guys heating, painting, then heating again so the paint cures properly. I'm curios of how to safely do this.

I am using an epoxy primer, then will final coat with a single stage urethane. I am only doing the bottom of the unibody/frame, and front sub frame. Its pretty dry out here, so I have been lucky it hasn't started to rust yet, but I am running out of time and have to get this done. My heater is a 40K BTU forced air unit that runs on propane, with an open flame.

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Old 11-16-2007, 05:29 PM
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Couple of things to point out. The metal temp is as important as the air temp. That means that you need to get it warm and keep it that way for a while to get the metal warmed up. The metal can be 5-10 deg cooler than the air under normal conditions. If possible warm the area and vehicle for a day and maintain that temp before.

As for the temp afterwards, I would want to maintain about 65+ for atleast 4-5 hours after the painting. If you have a temp booth set-up, where is the exhaust going> If the exhaust is headed outside, and the intake is inside. you can place the heater in front of the intake of the booth, on the outside. That way, it is pulling the heat into the booth. Run the exhaust until the overspray is out.

Aaron
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Old 11-16-2007, 06:00 PM
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Thats pretty much how its setup, the heater is blowing into the booth, inside front of the garage. The exhaust is going out the rear, with the garage door open just enough to clear it. But the booth is not perfectly sealed, so I get some fumes in the garage.

After spraying, how long should I wait to make sure its safe to fire up the heater?

Thanks
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Old 11-16-2007, 07:50 PM
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its not all that sensitive to fumes. along with me i have know many others that spray in rooms with poor ventilation and a torpedo heater right inside with them. i can recall a few times years back when the overspray was so thick you could barely see the flames comming out of the heater. the lack of oxygen in the room caused the flames to be orange with no blue. now i dont ever recommend that nor do i do it anymore since i have a real booth. i was just pointing out that just a little fumes in the air isn't going to be enough to blow anything up. the amount in the air would have to be pretty extreme.
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Old 11-16-2007, 08:17 PM
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CLEAN.... I have done the same thing. I just refuse to advise someone else to do it. I sure as hell don't want to be the one that advised it and something happened.

Aaron
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Old 11-16-2007, 08:46 PM
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When I was young and dumb, okay not much has changed cept the young part, I painted a car or two, when still living at home, with only a box fan running and a barrel wood stove right near where I was painting. It would struggle to heat up the fairly large garage, but when paint fumes started to fill the roam, the fire would start roaring and give more heat. Knew a guy back in school I'd help out at his uncles farm, who also would paint while wood stove was going heating the shed. But also a shop down the road from where I use to work, burnt to the ground that used wood for heat. Paint fumes/ solvent are not the only thing that can ignite, a lot of dust in the room sanding can be just as dangerous, and there are other possible sources of ignition, like switches, lights and metal fan blades.

I heat my garage with a kerosene torpedo heater when too cold/ and now have a fan that can clear the garage fairly well, as well as efficient spray guns. I also have worked in a shop for awhile that would help heat the booth with a kerosene heater.

Don't have a build up of overspray when running the heater, I usually let the fan run and wait till I see no overspray in the garage then run the heater again, and feel fairly safe and leave the garage after starting the heater. I normally warm up well before starting base, and then prior to clear, and then again when clear is finished and garage is clear. My small uninsulated garage don't take too long to warm back up once I run the heater. Then keep garage heated when finished for at least a few hours. Like aaron said, I am sure many of us have taken some risks, but don't want to be the one that tells someone to do something, and have him blow up or burn the garage to the ground. Now I usually don't hassle with it much in winter, it gets dang cold around here and the cost of kerosene these days is not real cheap. Someday hopefully I'll just have a good place to paint and make life easier, and the garage more enjoyable.
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Old 11-16-2007, 09:34 PM
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Make sure that you heater burns nice and clean. Yours is a propane heater so you should be okay. I had a friend who just finished painting his car and when he turned on his kerosene heater, black sooty smoke came out and started circulating around the garage. A lot of that soot landed all over the fresh paint he ended up having to color sand the entire car. Luckily it was a single stage Centari paint job. If it had been a BC/CC, he would have probably had to redo the entire job.

I have seen kerosene heater mess up some prep work too. The fumes laid down a thin film and was not all wiped down before shooting begun. The paint looked okay when it went down but then started to either fish eye in those missed areas.
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Old 11-17-2007, 10:35 AM
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Thanks for all the replies, Makes me feel a little more comfortable. I wouldn't have given it much though, just cleared out the over spray and fired that sucker up. But sometimes reading books, makes you think too much. I remember back when I was a full serve gas station attendant, dating myself a bit now, I would fill someones tank with a cigarette hanging out of my mouth and not give it a second thought. And that was before they had those funky plastic fume return things. I know most all painting stuff is flammable, so I just wanted make sure I wasn't being too stupid. After a near death experience some years back life is more precious to me now, and I do mean _____________________. Looking at the weather for tomorrow, painting day, it should be in the mid 60s by noon. Unfortunately the day is starting in the mid 30s. So I'll get up and fire up the heater, paint around noon when the sun is directly on my garage door, and hopefully get this done!

Thanks for all the replies
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Old 11-01-2009, 04:53 AM
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I just did the same thing, I brought temp up to around 70,shut off furnace. Then painted the car, waited until all visible over spray dissipated. then fired furnace back up. All worked fine, the key is good ventilation. I repeated this cycle between coats. It worked fine.

Bob
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