Paitning Your Inner Engine With "GLYPTAL PAINT" - Page 3 - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> General Rodding Tech
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #31 (permalink)  
Old 12-24-2011, 05:45 AM
How fast is fast enough?
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: St. Louis, MO
Age: 28
Posts: 8,669
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 16
Thanked 278 Times in 260 Posts
There's no measurable advantages nor disadvantages but as some have noted it makes for an easier time doing a clean assembly and easier identification. So if you need to mark your engines or tend to have messy assembly practices it may be of some use there. The rest of it is just good for paint sales.

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #32 (permalink)  
Old 12-24-2011, 08:42 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Abu Dhabi, UAE
Posts: 49
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have painted a 4 engines (2 sbc's & 2 bbc's) with glyptol over the years and have looked inside 'em later without finding any evidence of flaking or peeling. The question is does it help? Not that I could tell...one tip though. When it comes time to paint the lifter gallery useing wine corks in the lifter holes works very well. One thing though...it takes a considerable amount of time to prepare for the glyptol application. Good luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #33 (permalink)  
Old 12-24-2011, 08:18 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: NY
Posts: 157
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
What happens if the paint starts to lift & peel?

I don't agree about the oil drainback advantage. If you have dainback issues, painting your block aint gonna fix it - lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #34 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2014, 12:09 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Pittsfield NH
Posts: 46
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I've had glyptal painted Ram Air heads for almost 30 years now and there is no flaking or chipping of it. There is also not one of iota of sludge anywhere on them. It looks beautiful when applied and if you have to store any parts wherever it is you wont find rust when you decide to reuse them again.

The oil drainback is a speed issue I believe. Ever see that movie "Thin Red Line" ? I think thats the one anyways GI's were on some tropical island and there was a plant with great big leaves that when water droplets hit it it actually accelerated them. They used them to get drinks of rainwater. The speed increase was incredible, one of those things that stick in my warped mind Acceleration was, I think, because of some substance on its surface that has less friction than air maybe. I think Glyptal is like that to some degree. You could test it, Glytptal is not that expensive. Take 2 pieces of 1/2 " iron or aluminum pipe the same length and clean them per the Glyptal prep procedure. Paint the inside of 1 with Glyptal and let cure. Get a funnel that will hold an inverted quart and time an equal test into a bucket vertically and horizontally. Bet you find the Glyptal pipe is faster in both even tho diameter is decreased by paint thickness. Maybe I'll do that when I get a minute.

I like the stuff and am putting together a kind of whacky sbc that everyone thinks will be a dud. I didnt think of painting the intake and exhaust ports with Glyptal but I just might now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #35 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2014, 01:00 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
Age: 64
Posts: 50
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Back in the old days, I think Harley engine cases were painted like that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #36 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2014, 03:36 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Pittsfield NH
Posts: 46
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Wow , thats a great piece of info for me ... in addition to my whacky dud sbc Im building a fairly straightforward 86 sporty motor. Im right at cleaning and prepping the case halves. Hadnt been thinking about that. Know how I want the exterior ... not sure that baking is part of the process or if it would enhance adhesion of the exterior wrinkle coat paint or the Glyptal inside but was thinking of moving my old kitchen oven to the basement for occasional heat, paint curing and possible powder coating when I get my new one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #37 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2014, 02:30 PM
Old Unwise One
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: NW Ga
Posts: 37
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I worked at Southern Company for 33 yrs in generating plants.
All our electric motors were painted with GE Glyptal, even at temps high enough to boil generic crude based oils, the Glyptal showed no discoloring, peeling or detachment.

Smoky Yunick recommended Glyptal in one of his High Performance engine manuals to be used in the crankcase and for intake port smoothing when race guidelines prohibit polishing.

Here's a link to GE's Glyptal product page, the series "1201" products are the ones I have used in the past.
http://www.glyptal.com/Glyptal_Product_Data_Sheets.htm

Last edited by DrVette; 01-03-2014 at 02:34 PM. Reason: insert GE link
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #38 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2014, 08:47 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Pittsfield NH
Posts: 46
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I see that it may not be appropriate for exhaust ports with a temperature limit of 135 C/275 F from the spec sheet. If I want to improve port flow I might do better with a high temp counterpart maybe in the exhaust port area although if Smokey Yunick recommends it for intake Im not afraid to try it there. I see the coating companies are doing up exhaust system components (DPR White Lightning ... others) as well as moving engine parts. Must be some benefit to it and possibly a way do-it-yourselfers can get some of that benefit. Exhausts usually rust from the inside out I think ... painting with a high temp thermal barrier that would stay and be slick seems to make sense to me. Coating companies probably have a much better application setup and better product just not sure how much I need or can afford.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #39 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2014, 01:27 PM
Old Unwise One
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: NW Ga
Posts: 37
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Sure it's limited in practicality for street usage, however it does offer some benefits.

1. Sealing Porosities in Cast iron & Aluminum,
this eliminates pores for honing debris to hide, releasing when operating temp is achieved. [Improper removal of Silicon Carbide]
Aluminum 4-wheeler & motorcycles; submerged engines soaked with mud absorb debris, NEVER can be cleaned fully.
A rebuild lasts until the Aluminum opens up releasing the mud. Per Kawasaki of Rome and Honda Suzuki of Rome.
Sealing porosities in automatic transmissions, several mfg's had problems with cross pressure issues in valve bodies and transmission flows.

2. Smoothing engine castings to stop retention of debris, allows better oil removal.

3. Race engines benefit from faster oil return to the crankcase.

IMHO the real biggie is locking the pores to keep honing debris from ruining a new build.
How many engine shops have a caustic "Hot Tank" with sodium hydroxide anymore ?

Here's some builders discussing Hot Tank specifics.
Hot tank tempatures € Speed Talk

Last edited by DrVette; 01-04-2014 at 01:33 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #40 (permalink)  
Old 01-06-2014, 05:00 PM
1971BB427's Avatar
Registered User
 

Last journal entry: Latest changes
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Portland
Posts: 1,449
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 11
Thanked 215 Times in 186 Posts
I really don't know if anyone can measure how quickly oil returns to the bottom end with or without Glyptol paint in the engine, but I've done it for years. I never do it unless the engine is a complete build and freshly cleaned and bare. The last one was done 30 years ago, and still is holding up great. I not only do the lifter valley, but also do the rocker area of the heads. I chamfer and deburr all the holes in the heads and the valley prior to painting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent General Rodding Tech posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
setting points on sb chevy frackster66 Electrical 23 01-07-2014 05:50 PM
ENGINE BALANCING NAIRB Engine 19 12-29-2013 06:45 PM
the history of chevy v8's savman1 Hotrodders' Lounge 43 03-02-2012 06:57 PM
1973 Chevelle Malibu Engine Rebuild (pics 56k no) Malibu73 Hotrodders' Lounge 39 11-04-2008 12:37 PM
question for any engine builders out there mopar72 Engine 7 11-06-2005 03:06 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.