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Old 08-11-2006, 10:24 PM
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Paitning Your Inner Engine With "GLYPTAL PAINT"

Hi Guys

I'm using this great paint called: GLYPTAL 1201 RED ENAMEL
This paint is use for other electrical componets also, its water proof, heat proof and just is great for painting YOUR OIL GALLEY.

The surfaces in your inner engine is rough and the when the oil runs ontop of this surface it SLOWS THE OIL DOWN AND IT REACHES YOUR ENGINE PART MUCH MORE SLOWER than running over a smooth surface.

Getting to the point:
I painted my oil galley and it came out beautiful ~ nice and smooth (2 coats) did the job just fine. I chamfered the oil returns also.

Problem is: WHERE ELSE DO I USE THIS PAINT. ON WHAT AREAS
Have any of your gentlemen ever done this painting before ? If so, please let me know where else do I use this great paint.

THANKS GUYS
GOD BLESS

Schooner

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Old 08-12-2006, 06:04 AM
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I painted every bit of rough casting.
If I had my time again - I'd use a grinder to polish it rather than painting.


Last edited by crossy; 08-12-2006 at 06:12 AM.
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Old 08-12-2006, 08:49 AM
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Painting your inner engine with glyptal paint

We used it when rebuilding Starters and old generators. Paint the inside of the housing before mounting any parts. We also used it on the big oil cooled Delco alternators, 300 amps. Had an olds engine in a stock car that we painted the inside of the block. Ran it all season and then tore it down, paint was still in good condition and the engine ran very hot a times.
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Old 08-12-2006, 10:13 AM
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painting the engine weather inside or out will hold in heat.imo this is a bad idea,for one when the paint does and will flake it goes where the oil go's.oil pumps don't like things like paint,lint,silicone.
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Old 08-12-2006, 03:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nitro_baller4692
painting the engine weather inside or out will hold in heat.imo this is a bad idea,for one when the paint does and will flake it goes where the oil go's.oil pumps don't like things like paint,lint,silicone.
Don't tell that to Smokey Yunick. He pioneered painting the insides of engines. Seems he made so much power doing it they wrote a rule against it.

A properly cleaned engine that is painted with glyptol will NOT flake the paint off. Glyptol was designed for high heat conditions.
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Old 08-12-2006, 07:57 PM
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gyptol

Been doing it for yrs, after polishing the area. great stuff. locally thats how i tell its one of my engs.
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Old 08-12-2006, 10:14 PM
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"Don't tell that to Smokey Yunick. He pioneered painting the insides of engines. Seems he made so much power doing it they wrote a rule against it."

Someone please explain how painting the inside (or out) makes more power?

There are two schools of thought on painting the inside of the block, 10 is to prevent any loose "casting" from falling off and 2) is to assist in oil drain back to the pan. The second reason holds some merrit.

I will tell you from experience that smoothing out the outside of the block will lead to a warmer running engine. All those little bumps and grooves are like heat sinks. Once you sand, grind, polish them away, the engine will tend to run warmer. I have done it, sure a great cooling system will help over come that issue.
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Old 08-13-2006, 12:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camaroman7d

There are two schools of thought on painting the inside of the block, 10 is to prevent any loose "casting" from falling off and 2) is to assist in oil drain back to the pan. The second reason holds some merrit.
I painted mine to lock all the loose casting / sand in - why does this reason have no merit
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Old 08-13-2006, 08:09 AM
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crossy,
I didn't say it had no merrit but, I just don't think it is a good reason nor that it will help. Here's why I say this, the engine you are dealing with is probably 30 years old, whatever was going to "fall off" has by now. Hopefully anyone building an engine has it properly cleaned, if not the paint isn't going to stick anyway. I always debur the blocks I base a build off of before the block goes to the machine shop for work and CLEANING. When I get it hole I totally scrub the block and all the passages. After all that what would make a piece off casting or sand fall off? Where would it come from? If you can see it to paint it you should be able to clean it up so you don't have to worry about it falling off.

I just don't think there is much if any benefit to painting the inside of an engine, that's just my opinion.
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Old 08-13-2006, 09:51 PM
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Thanks For The Imput Guys: THE GLYPTAL FACTOR

Quote:
Originally Posted by crossy
I painted every bit of rough casting.
If I had my time again - I'd use a grinder to polish it rather than painting.

Hey Crossy

What a great pic you posted; looking good. I sure started something with my
posting. Did mean too, just looking for some help and I got it from lots you guys.

I appreciate all your imput. Even those great guys who are opposed to painting the inside of their engines.

I will go on and paint further Grossy ~ THANK YOU SO MUCH.

I'm still leaning thanks to guys like you.

P.S. Grossy did you CHAMFER the oil return holes ? I did.
GOD BLESS YOU GUYS

Schooner
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Old 08-14-2006, 06:19 AM
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my standard is not to use any paint inside of the engine... i don't grind it smooth either... on mouse motors i put debris screens fore and aft and vents down the valley in the drainback holes near the lifters... reason for this is #1 to keep the oil off of the crank (runnign a roller camshaft lessens the need for this added lubrication) and #2 i don't plug the valley drainbacks because i don't want to force the crankcase pressure up through the open drainback holes at the ends...

i just feel that adding glyptal has more negatives than positives.. you may gain a bit of oil drainback improvement but in the end it costs time and money... i only paint if told to do so by a customer...
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Old 08-14-2006, 10:35 AM
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For the home builder, painting the inside of an engine helps drain back of oil. If it will eventually be a high mileage engine, it will reduce the rough surfaces for sludge to hang on. Just make sure that the engine is sparkling clean or it can cause many problems if it flakes off and clogs oil galleys. Lesser is to hold casting sand and iron in place.

This paint was originally manufactured by General Electric to be used as a motor and generator coil paint before the inception of some of the new "wonder" coatings. I was a production scheduler for those coils years ago and saw many, many gallons applied - by hand with a brush. It is a super everything resistant paint
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Old 08-14-2006, 12:16 PM
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When Smokey first painted his engines he also painted the intake and exhaust ports. They were not allowed to grind them smooth, AKA porting. With the paint, many thin layers, they became smooth and increased flow rates. As he made more power and was beating everyone, they wrote a rule against painted ports.

Time sure has passed seeing that Smokey's tricks are not second nature in Hot Rodding.
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Old 12-21-2011, 02:48 PM
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Re: GE Glyptal

There are 3 Versions of the Glyptal Red $1201

1201 - Brush Can
1204A - Aerosol
1201B - Brush Can, thicker, heavier film for thread/gasket sealing

My take on Glyptal Red 1201 on IC engine usage;

#1 -Machine Shop and they used a finish hone on the cylinder walls, the block will retain some of this grit.
The Glyptal Red will seal in this grit.

#2 - Automatic Transmissions
Some had porosities that allowed fluid pressure go cause issues not fixed with convention methods.

There are 39 more items in the product line for specific applications.[/B]
Glyptal products

If you want one of the other items, and cannot find it easily, look up a "Mill Supply Store" nearby, they also are usually the cheapest place to get generic items.

I worked in a Electrical Generation Power Plant for over 3 decades, before that at an auto dealership as a wrench [Technician]<-Modern terms
We had many GE CT's [Combustion Turbine Generators]
GE Jet Aircraft approved some Glyptal products as a protective finish on jet engine components

Anyway, all of our electric motors were painted with Glyptal, the cooling fins, motor housing, stator and rotor. I've never seen an instance of flaking or any type of release, except after a major fire.


Here's a .pdf of the application data on GE Glyptal 1201
Application limitation data on Glyptal 1201

Hope this helps somehow, and is not just a useless waste of a thread "bump"
DrVette

Last edited by DrVette; 12-21-2011 at 03:01 PM.
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Old 12-21-2011, 04:30 PM
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Hands please.How many guys have lost a motor due to some unforeseen grit?
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