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Old 03-11-2005, 01:22 PM
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Panel Blending

Should the entire (painted) panel be sanded before clearcoating when making
a repair to just a small portion of it? I usually wet sand the entire panel with
600 grit, blend my color, then clear the entire panel but I just heard that
it's better to buff the panel to clean the existing paint then clear right
over that. Is buffing enough?

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Old 03-11-2005, 02:09 PM
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With lacquer, yes, with urethane NO, a big NO. The urethane is just not going to "melt" in like a lacquer will being it is insoluable (relaitivily speaking).

Have you tried "scuff gel" with a gray scuff pad? It works much better for blend panels than any sandpaper, especially something as coarse as 600.
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Old 03-11-2005, 06:33 PM
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I use the gray scotch brite and scuff the whole area being cleared.
Buffing wouldn't seem to give it enough "scratch" for the clear to grab to.

While we're here, How about a shot of straight reducer over the last coat of clear to "melt" it in??

I know Kosmoski use's it on his HOK blend job's as the final coat before finish buffing. Laying back on the blend area with the buffing and his job's look great.

I personaly haven't had much luck in blending the clear,I alway's end up with the dreaded "line" no matter how light/grit I buff or sand with.
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Old 03-11-2005, 06:41 PM
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My previous post is in response to Jims question as I saw it,that would be to prepare a panel for COLOR blending and then complete clearing. If I am wrong on that let me know.

Adding solvent isn't going to do much, it still won't "melt" that substrate if it is urethane. To blend out clear, scuff jell with gray scuff pad out to where you plan on ending the blend.

Blend the clear up to very close without "whipping" the gun out. Just spray up and leave it with a tiny "whip" at the end as to not make a quick stop with the trigger pulled. Then spray back INTO the wet clear from near the end of the scuffed area. Put a little solvent into the clear and lightly dust the very end which right up to the scuffed end.

This works remarkably well for an invisible blend.
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Old 03-11-2005, 07:17 PM
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Put a little solvent into the clear and lightly dust the very end right up to the scuffed end.
Is this what you mean?

I know what your saying. I've seen the System One procedure and tried it but I guess I just stink at blending clear.

I actually screwed up a blend using Dupont Blending agent,As I shot the COLOR first and then shot the agent out over (past) the color and blended the color over it and cleared. Turned out beautiful...
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Old 03-11-2005, 07:18 PM
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Blending clear can definately be a challenge. I usually buff the panel a good distance around my blend area then prep exactly as Martinsr suggests or use 1000 grit wet and apply the clear in stages, first coat to cover the fresh color with the gun angled towards the center of the area to keep overspray off the surrounding area, then apply another coat out to the edge of the sanded area with a quick flip of the gun to taper the edge of the clear, then dust some blending solvent over the clear edge to melt it down. Let it dry as long as possible then lightly sand with 1500 or 2000 and buff gently. The majority of failures doing a clear blend are the result of improper prep, color being brought out to the edge of the blend area, and trying to buff the blend before the clear has completely hardened. If you try and buff this while the clear is too soft the edge will always show. The clear needs to be very well cured before buffing IMO.

Blending color and clearing the complete panel is usually the best way to go. Prep and blend liquid with a grey scotchbrite works great especially metalics, solid colors aren't very fussy and 600 grit works fine. A red scotchbrite can also be used with solid colors and also metalics if you spray down a coat of Dupont 222S, PPG DBU500 or DBC500 or Global D895, prior to applying your color. These products wet the surface giving you a smooth surface to blend your color. Metalic and pearl colors require a fairly smooth surface to be properly applied- heavy sandscratches will hang up metalics and pearls will just highlight surface imperfections (you end up seeing the scuff marks after the clear is applied) Ramble, ramble- Have a good weekend
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Old 03-11-2005, 07:25 PM
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Thanks badbob, I will,
Gonna rebuild the front porch railing's Sat.
Just got thru bead rolling some tub's for a blown 'Vett this evening.
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Old 03-11-2005, 07:28 PM
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checkout this link.

http://www.systemoneproducts.com/blending.html

its a good step by step on blending clear. of course you dont have to use their product. any will do. i always had a problem with the line too but barry gave me a good tip recently and told me to put a curing lamp on the blend area for a couple hours. it worked great....no line. on a black car too!!
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Old 03-11-2005, 07:39 PM
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Your correct 6,
They DO stress the fact of using heat to cure it with.
As badbod stated,It DOES need to be DRY before buffing.

Probbly WHY I have SO much trouble.

Sorry jcclark, Wasn't trying to hijack you post.
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Old 03-12-2005, 06:01 PM
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Quite allright, I'm very interested in blending clears too.
I usually try and clear the entire panel when possible, I was interested in
what is the best preparation method of the old existing paint that I
will clear over along with my new color blend, I usually sand it with
600 or 1000 grit but I'm hearing others say just buff out the old paint and
that's enough. I'm not sure if that gives enough "tooth" for good adhesion of
the clear. When I blend clear I use a DuPont product made for blending
that you use straight out of the can, I'm going to ask some questions about
that later but for right now I would like to here about clearing over the existing
paint. The gray scuff pad sounds easier, I think I'll try that
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Old 03-12-2005, 06:25 PM
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no, you dont want to clear over old polished clear. they tell you to buff the clear to make sure its completely clean. in the blend area a grey scotchbrite works great or 2000 works good too but i like the grey scotchbrite better.
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Old 03-13-2005, 05:43 AM
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http://www.handsontools.com/store-pr...%3E_11241.html
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Old 03-13-2005, 05:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcclark
Quite allright, I'm very interested in blending clears too.
I usually try and clear the entire panel when possible, I was interested in
what is the best preparation method of the old existing paint that I
will clear over along with my new color blend, I usually sand it with
600 or 1000 grit but I'm hearing others say just buff out the old paint and
that's enough. I'm not sure if that gives enough "tooth" for good adhesion of
the clear. When I blend clear I use a DuPont product made for blending
that you use straight out of the can, I'm going to ask some questions about
that later but for right now I would like to here about clearing over the existing
paint. The gray scuff pad sounds easier, I think I'll try that
************************************************
If that Dupont blending stuff is 222s, throw it is the garbage, thats why your having problems burning in the clear. Sikkens (sr45), U-pol (fadeout) and some others have good burning in products.
Stick some on your finger and when dry there should be nothing left, that how you can tell its nothing but solvents.
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Old 03-13-2005, 07:00 AM
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The blender I use is Dupont ChromaClear 7601S.
It works great.(I never said I had any problems blending clear.)
I guess the answer I was looking for was using a gray scuff pad
to prep the panel. Thanks to all for the extra info!
I've been painting for more than 20 yrs and this forum is the
first place I've been able to get consistent answers.
I'll be asking a lot more later.

Last edited by jcclark; 03-13-2005 at 07:07 AM.
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Old 03-14-2005, 03:33 PM
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Scuff the whole panel and clear it. A clear blend will always come back.Blending clears and reducers only hide it for awhile.If you have to make a clear blend,go to the smallest spot possible, use a grey suff pad and clear up to the end of the suff marks then put a very light coat of reducer over it...very light. if you polish you car alot expect to see it after the third polish or the first buffing.
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