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Old 06-24-2007, 02:56 PM
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Piping air line from basement into the garage - help needed

Hey guys,

After lots of reading I think I'm ready to plunge into the world of hard air lines.

As ill be running a small compressor (Ingersoll Rand 24gal 2HP 5.7@90psi) I need to limit the amount of air pressure loss within a large distance of pipe. It will be around 75ft from compressor to hose reel (which then has 50ft 3/8" hose), so in the end it will be around 125ft from compressor to air tool.

I was looking at using 1/2" copper pipe as 3/4" is about double the cost, would the 1/2" perform equality to the 3/4"?

I am running 3/8" couplers/fittings so that should hopefully limit the amount of loss.

I attached a picture of a mockup of my soon to be garage setup. You can see where the pipes start (drilled through concrete from basement), now the question is, should I go vertical (brown lines) or horizontal (purple) to my regulator/filter?

One last question, should I put a 2nd filter inline in my basement aswell (somewhere in the middle of the run) or just have the one at the end of the line (in garage beside regulator)?

It's rated at 20 micron, so I'm not sure if thats good or bad. I picked it up at Princess Auto (Canadian version of HF)
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Last edited by mikeweb; 06-30-2007 at 02:33 PM.
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Old 06-24-2007, 09:45 PM
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I used 3/4 for mine. The size of compressor dosen't make mauch difference once the lines are filled because they become a vessel and the pump shuts of when the vessel is full. So initially it will take longer to fill but using tools you wont notice anything except that it take longer for the compressor to kick on and off. The 1/2 will work fine I just prefer 3/4. One way or another I think your compressor is to small for any kind of painting or sanding but it will do ok for impacts, ratchets and the like. 20 microns is will do fine also but if your painting 5 microns would be better. There is quite a few post on the subject I think if you do a little searching you'll find what you need.

Kris,
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Old 06-25-2007, 03:31 AM
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Considering that the size of the compressor is going to all but eliminate the use of high volume tools such as HVLP paint guns the 1/2" air lines will be all you will need and should be just fine. If there is any possibility that you may buy a larger compressor in the future then you may want to run the 3/4" lines now but if not the 3/4" would be an unnecessary expense. Definitely run the lines in that vertical (brown) configuration and DEFINITELY! continue the line on down past the regulator at least 18" and add a drain then tee off to the regulator. If you do not add this "drop" to the line at the regulator then in the configuration you have pictured the air hose will, in all likelihood, function more like a water hose at times than an air hose.
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Old 06-25-2007, 03:53 PM
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Compressor plumbing

!/2 inch is ok. Condensation is the big problem. The pipe hopefully below the frost line from the house should rise a few inches as it goes to the garage. At the basement solder in a tee so you can add pipe about 2 feet or more lower than where it enters the foundation for a water trap add a garden hose style faucet to the bottom to drain it, they are so much easier to use than petcocks. At each place you have a coupler on the wall add a filter. You should have the same the type trap and drain as in the basement at each one of these coupler locations. All horizontal pipes in garage should also have slope to the drains. That u around the garage door could be a big water trap. The filters you bought are fine for air tools. Painting would require a larger one.
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Old 06-26-2007, 05:29 PM
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Ok, so something like this?

I have two drains and got rid of the "U", note that the pipe will be going against the wall.

Any more changes, improvements?
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Old 06-27-2007, 06:00 AM
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I almost forgot to ask, which type of pipe should be used? K, L, M??

Edit: Nevermind, apparently M is thin wall, L is medium and K is thick. M should do find but I'll go with the L if the price isn't that much more. Gonna check out Home Depot for pricing.

Last edited by mikeweb; 06-30-2007 at 01:43 PM.
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Old 06-30-2007, 01:50 PM
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Ok, so after some more reading on various sites (HERE) they state that you shouldn't have to much of a slope. With that said can someone confirm if this is indeed correct?

I added a green bar to the updated image to show this. I want to do this correct the 1st time around, I hate doing things twice so the more help I can get the better

Thank you

NOTE: The air lines will be against the wall so it wont be obstructing anything (allot of people didn't figure this out)
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Last edited by mikeweb; 06-30-2007 at 04:18 PM.
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Old 06-30-2007, 05:32 PM
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Don't worry too much about the slope just run the line so that the water does not drain AWAY from your collection drops (water traps) and so that the is no low spot anywhere in the system that water could sit without having a place to drain to where it can be drained from the system. An example would be the bottom of a "U" if it did not have a collection drop with a drain valve or any place in the line that might be allowed to droop causing a low spot. If there is any place in the line where water can collect with nowhere to drain where it would not be exposed to the air flow then it will collect in that spot until it starts to restrict the air flow then it will be picked up and discharged in spurts until the line clears then the cycle will start all over again. The purpose of the "drops" is to give the water a place to drain to so it will be out of the air flow and since the air will flow past, but not into, these drops the water can remain there undisturbed until it is drained.
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Old 06-30-2007, 05:46 PM
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have you priced or given any thought to plastic pipe ? i worked for a travel trailer dealership and we did the garage with the gray plastic pipe and never had any problems. i painted my one car in that garage used impact tools. all with good results.
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Old 06-30-2007, 06:03 PM
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The copper is best, we have seen plastic burst. The plastic will carry the pressure, but as it gets older, it gets brittle. We had a few glue joints fall after a few years, as well. Also a huge chance of getting bumped, and broken. It sounds like a bomb going off. The peaces flying at 150psi are like, bad news.
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Old 06-30-2007, 07:36 PM
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This is the setup I have been using for the last 5 months, although I plan to move the compressor outside and add a refrigerated air line dryer - I'll still use this setup in conjunction (Note: I mounted it to a wooden frame for ease of moving) I haven't gotten any moisture past the the regulator/filter - it gets caught in the the 2 collection points with p@t-*****.

Combined its 28-32 ft of 3/4 L copper and the hose reel is 50ft so reaches everywhere I need in my 22x40 shop.

The only change I have made from this picture is shortening the hi-pressure flex line to drain more easily back into the tank.

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Old 06-30-2007, 07:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildman1932
The copper is best, we have seen plastic burst. The plastic will carry the pressure, but as it gets older, it gets brittle. We had a few glue joints fall after a few years, as well. Also a huge chance of getting bumped, and broken. It sounds like a bomb going off. The peaces flying at 150psi are like, bad news.

oh ok , but i didn't use the hard plastic , it was the gray flexable with the metal crimp rings for connections. i also saw a great system on 2 guys garage looked very easy to install.....
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Old 06-30-2007, 09:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildthing
oh ok , but i didn't use the hard plastic , it was the gray flexable with the metal crimp rings for connections. i also saw a great system on 2 guys garage looked very easy to install.....

As a rule of thumb never use any kind of plastic line for compressed gas or air unless it was designed for that purpose and NEVER EVER use PVC! , the PVC has been discussed here at length several times. Not sure what kind of plastic you are talking about but if it is made for air it may be safe but there would still be the moisture problem due to the lack of cooling and these specialty plastics would probably be on a par with Copper in cost. If you can find out more about what it was it may be interesting to hear about.
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Old 06-30-2007, 09:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildman1932
The copper is best, we have seen plastic burst. The plastic will carry the pressure, but as it gets older, it gets brittle. We had a few glue joints fall after a few years, as well. Also a huge chance of getting bumped, and broken. It sounds like a bomb going off. The peaces flying at 150psi are like, bad news.
More like shrapnel and those tiny razor sharp shards of PVC will not show up on an X-ray if you happen to be hit with one.
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Old 07-01-2007, 07:05 AM
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Thanks for the good info guys!

One thing that I'm a little confused about is to how you guys connected your hoses/fittings to the copper pipe. I take it you can purchase copper pipe fittings (adapters) with threads already cut into it? for example 1/2" NPT?

Example, I want to connect the inlet side of the filter (1/2" NPT) to the copper T fitting, how would this be accomplished?

All the fittings I got look like they are zinc coated, hopefully they are the correct stuff (see link)

http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/atta...chmentid=22438

Sorry for all the questions as I know they are basic, but I got to learn eventually

Last edited by mikeweb; 07-01-2007 at 07:12 AM.
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