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-   -   pitted frame (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/pitted-frame-227345.html)

peteandrepete232 12-19-2012 09:56 AM

pitted frame
 
Hi I just got my frame back from the sandblasters and its pitted I knew it was gonna need work I have talked to a couple of people and they say to use bondo or something similar and other people have told me to use a fiberglass product if anybody has any suggestions that would be great

69 widetrack 12-19-2012 10:30 AM

How deep are the pits? Is it going to be a show vehicle? If the pits aren't to bad, go over the frame with 80 grit on the DA and use a product like an Epoxy primer that has build and sanding qualities...like SPI....(I haven't tried it yet but will shortly and with all the firm believers on this forum I thought I'd suggest it before somebody else...LOL). Seriously, with a high build Epoxy that you can sand and with reducing your pitted metal profile with 80 grit, you should be able to get rid of most of the imperfections...if you still have some imperfections, a little 2 part finishing putty and a re-prime in those areas would fix it up...if it doesn't...look at getting a new or different frame as the one you have may then be to week to work with.

Ray

techinspector1 12-19-2012 02:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by peteandrepete232 (Post 1624502)
Hi I just got my frame back from the sandblasters and its pitted I knew it was gonna need work I have talked to a couple of people and they say to use bondo or something similar and other people have told me to use a fiberglass product if anybody has any suggestions that would be great

What frame? What car? What intended purpose? What motor/trans/diff?
Everyday, I see the same thing from you guys. You ask a question without giving any details. We realize you probably know everything there is to know about your project, while we don't know squat. You ask for an opinion without letting go of all the details. Garbage in, garbage out. Good answer by 69widetrack, but the rest of us need more info.

peteandrepete232 12-19-2012 02:34 PM

sorry about that I'm new and you are right I need to put more info out their for you guys it's a 1929 model going back to all original motor and trans its not going to be a show car just always wanted to restore a car and I got this one cheap on the premises that I restore it hope that helps you help me

69 widetrack 12-19-2012 02:50 PM

OK thanks for the extra information...I'm currently working on a 1930 Model A Ford and a 1922 Ford Hack/Woody Wagon...Is your 1929 a Ford? Especially if it's a Ford (not that I think Ford is weaker or stronger than any other make, it's just that most of my experience with cars of that era are Ford's) my first recommendation still applies, pay close attention to the area of the frame on the drivers side near the engine...they have a tendency to twist or sag in that area, and would be more prone to twist if you have a major rust or pitting issues.

Hope this helps.

Ray

techinspector1 12-19-2012 03:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 69 widetrack (Post 1624634)
OK thanks for the extra information...I'm currently working on a 1930 Model A Ford and a 1922 Ford Hack/Woody Wagon...Is your 1929 a Ford? Especially if it's a Ford (not that I think Ford is weaker or stronger than any other make, it's just that most of my experience with cars of that era are Ford's) my first recommendation still applies, pay close attention to the area of the frame on the drivers side near the engine...they have a tendency to twist or sag in that area, and would be more prone to twist if you have a major rust or pitting issues.
Hope this helps.
Ray

Good answer Ray. Boxing plates are commercially available for those fellows who want to stiffen up the frame. If rusting and pitting is severe, you may want to consider them.....
1928 - 1931 Model A Boxing Plates - Wolfes Metal Fabrication

prostcelica 12-19-2012 08:51 PM

If it were me and the pitting wasnt a structural issue(If it is take Ray and techs advise). Id skim the pits with regular body filler first. Block that down then prime with a high build urethaine primer like Clova prime 55 (dont know if you have a cloverdale paint where you are). Then wet block that down with 320 (If you use a guide coat it will tell you when the frame is completely sanded). You can them paint on top of that as long as it is a single stage 320 is fine enough. Be sure if you break through with the urethaine high build primer you need to atleast spot prime with an epoxy/sealer. Not a bad idea to just shoot a coat of epoxy sealer on the hole thing before you paint.

Hope this helps

MARTINSR 12-19-2012 09:41 PM

I say if it is pitted bad enough to box it get another frame! I wouldn't think of boxing a stock cars frame, they work just fine.

How deep are the pits? Really, put a straight edge of over them and see how deep they are. But they would have to be REALLY bad to worry much about it with a stock drive train.

Brian

Mark2268 12-20-2012 06:42 AM

At your local paint supplier there is a filler called ALL-METAL Body filler. It is a much more durable filler than the average Bondos. Check it out, it goes on smooth and I believe this will fit your needs perfectly. it is also good for any year vehical.

lakeroadster 12-20-2012 07:06 AM

A few pictures would be great.

If you are restoring I wouldn't use any filler on the frame. The stock frames twist alot and the filler will likely pop loose over time.

Now if you were hot rodding the frame and added boxing plates and maybe a k-member to the frame I'd think the filler would work.

John long 12-20-2012 10:28 AM

The problem with not filling the pits is this. It will look good until it leaves the garage and is driven. If you don't get the frame, and components, slick it is absolutely impossible to wash it and keep it clean. A rough or pitted frame will become an eye sore very quickly and really shows under a restored car that sits high off the ground.

I have never seen body filler, All Metal, or high build primer fail on a properly prepared chassis. Any will work depending on the depth of the pits. I suspect if this is an unrestored car that a body filler over epoxy would be the best and most cost effective. Post some pictures as you go. :)

John L

peteandrepete232 12-20-2012 02:32 PM

thanks everyone this has been a BIG help I'll post some pics as soon as I start

69 widetrack 12-20-2012 02:38 PM

Your more than welcome...if you need any more help or information, especially when you get to the body, (if it is a Ford, you haven't mentioned it yet), you'll find the splash shields just above the running boards to be a week point on the body, there are ways to tighten them up so feel free to ask, I'll help wherever I can...and yes, post pictures.

Good luck

Ray

prostcelica 12-20-2012 07:27 PM

X2 long john

dinger 12-20-2012 11:54 PM

Epoxy primer over the metal, then i would skim the frame with a thin coat of some good pklastic filler. Get it smooth, I wouldn't worry too much about it being perfectly straight, just get it looking good.


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