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Old 09-25-2007, 10:57 AM
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Please help me pan out this confusion with SS Brake Lines!

Hey Fellas, I have been reading endlessly about doing the correct flares on stainless steel brake lines. I purchased a stainless steel straight brake tubing kit from Inline Tubing for a 1947 Chevrolet car. I will need to create flares on them eventually. My first question:

1. 37 or 45 Flare?

2. Single or Double Flare?

3. Anybody that has done this, which tool would you recommend?

Thank you all!!!!

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Old 09-25-2007, 11:23 AM
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37 degree single flare with AN fittings.

If you use 45 degree flare you must double flare, and you cannot use SS because it is not advisable to double flare ss tubing.

I used this 37 degree flaring tool
on my car and it worked fine. Cheaper ones will not properly flare SS tubing.

Vince
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Old 09-25-2007, 11:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 302 Z28
37 degree single flare with AN fittings.

If you use 45 degree flare you must double flare, and you cannot use SS because it is not advisable to double flare ss tubing.

I used this 37 degree flaring tool
on my car and it worked fine. Cheaper ones will not properly flare SS tubing.

Vince
I don't think this is correct. First, the flare angle MUST match whatever the tube is going into. If you have a master cylinder with 45 deg flare fittings, the tube flare must also be 45 deg. Yes, you can get a boatload of adapters to convert all the 45 deg flares to 37 if you have money to burn, but why. Second, the reason for double flares isn't the 45 deg taper, it's because of the crappy properties of the mild steel tubing used on brake lines. The stainless tubing is much stronger and does not require double flares. Just take a look at the repro stainless lines sold by all the tubing vendors. You can be sure that their lawyers wouldn't let them sell single flare tubes if they were not safe.
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Old 09-25-2007, 11:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe_padavano
I don't think this is correct. First, the flare angle MUST match whatever the tube is going into. If you have a master cylinder with 45 deg flare fittings, the tube flare must also be 45 deg. Yes, you can get a boatload of adapters to convert all the 45 deg flares to 37 if you have money to burn, but why. Second, the reason for double flares isn't the 45 deg taper, it's because of the crappy properties of the mild steel tubing used on brake lines. The stainless tubing is much stronger and does not require double flares. Just take a look at the repro stainless lines sold by all the tubing vendors. You can be sure that their lawyers wouldn't let them sell single flare tubes if they were not safe.
There is no conversion needed on the master cylinder when you use the proper AN fittings. I used AN Banjo fittings on my car that placed the brake lines parallel to the master cylinder sides. They are not that expensive, certainly not requiring "money to burn". It is well worth the effort IMO to go with AN fittings with 37 degree flares when doing a complete brake line fabrication job.

I agree with your comments on 45 degree flares and mild steel tubing.

Vince
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Old 09-25-2007, 12:12 PM
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SS Lines

Would it help if I just called Inline Tube?
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Old 09-25-2007, 12:44 PM
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Hi,
Try here,
www.inlinetube.com/cartalk.htm

Good luck,
rich
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Old 09-25-2007, 01:10 PM
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It looks like I will plumb my SS lines using 45 double flare ends. I read through the FAQ on the Inline Tube website (thanks Rich) and it appears that the automotive industry used 45 for everything and 37 for Army and Navy military applications. The straight tubing I got from Inline does have one of the ends flared - looks like 45 double flared.

I'll buy some regular steel OEM brake lines from NAPA and practice my flares and bending. Thanks...
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Old 09-25-2007, 05:19 PM
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Stainless will NOT double flare ... without cracking ... and takes a real good flaring tool.

I use the hydraulic hand type ... and it still is very difficult to flare ... and has visible cracks in the flare ... 80% of the time.

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Old 09-25-2007, 05:36 PM
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Deuce,
Your correct in that regular
SS line will crack when double flared,
but inline tube SS lines are fully
annealed, & therefore can be double
flared without cracking.

Take care,
rich
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Old 09-25-2007, 05:37 PM
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From the inline tube website FAQ..
Quote:
Can I double flare stainless steel tube by hand?
Yes, you can double flare stainless steel lines bought from Inline Tube. Our tube is fully annealed and is very easy to work with. We recommend and offer several good flaring tools: Rigid, Imperial Eastman or Blue Point. Carefully follow all the instructions that come with the tool and the tubing, and the flare will be perfect every time.
I've done 45* double flares with annealed SS tube using my old Armstrong flaring tool, as well as my KD flaring tools. Neither of those are particularly expensive tools, but they worked.

The annealed SS line is harder than regular mild steel lines, but will double flare.

On the other hand, you can single flare @37* any of the SS tube available alot easier.

Later, mikey
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Old 09-25-2007, 05:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by powerrodsmike

On the other hand, you can single flare @37* any of the SS tube available alot easier.

Later, mikey
That was precisely my point, thanks Mikey.

Vince
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Old 09-26-2007, 08:04 AM
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Thanks for the responses. Extremely helpful. If I went 37, I would have to get additional hardware for, no? I think I am sticking to the conventional 45. Thanks.
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Old 12-11-2007, 01:45 PM
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Okay, I've been following this thread and read all of the older threads regarding using s.s. tubing for brake and/or fuel lines. I think all of the basics have been covered quite well, so I won't repeat what's already been written.
However, since I'm getting ready to do my brake plumbing, (I've decided on s.s.) there's one more question that hasn't been raised, at least to my knowledge: What material should the fittings be made of? Aluminum? Plain (carbon) steel? Stainless steel? Even most of the tubing supplier websites don't address this too well. It seems that all three materials are available in AN fittings, so what does everyone use?
My fuel lines at the carbs are s.s tubing with aluminum sleeves and nuts, so I guess that's okay. But for a brake system, should the fittings be s.s. also?
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Old 12-11-2007, 02:00 PM
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I read a thread on the hamb about those guys not using stainless bolts on their cars. They were complaining about bolt threads galling on dissimilar metals like blocks & heads. (cast iron, like your brake parts?) I have never used SS tubing, so I don't know. I sure wouldn't use aluminum.
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Old 12-11-2007, 02:28 PM
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Stainless steel bolts for engine building and stainless steel tubing for brake lines are quite different discussions. High grade bolts are high grade bolts through alloying and heat treatment. Stainless steel bolts are prone to galling because of pressure at the contact surfaces on the oxide film that is stainless steel's source of corrosion protection. Which isn't a factor with brake lines.

AN fittings are made of aluminum, but the anodizing protects against the galvanic corrosion.
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