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Old 03-14-2006, 07:41 AM
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Cboy, I am certainly no expert on polishing but I recently polished a set of aluminum wheels and a FI manifold for a 5.0 and although I used the same procedure you started out with (Except I used a much higher speed to begin with) I did not have the problems you have run into. The main difference I see is I used the compound sticks sold at Sears so maybe you are on to something with the idea that maybe it is the compound you are using. It would cost very little to try the compound from Sears, it worked really good for me. Just a thought.

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Old 03-14-2006, 08:28 AM
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Chet: I'm going to hobble along with the "new" system but it sure is time consuming. So I'm still looking for any improvements I can make. Regarding the black residue, I think you are correct that it is to be expected. I know I always get it when I shine up my wheels with Mothers polish. It just seems I'm producing WAY too much of it on this manifold and that, unlike my wheels, the stuff is then turning into a tar like substance that gets so sticky or hard that it can no longer be buffed.

Oldred: Next time I'm at Sears I'll definitely pick up some of their compounds, or maybe I'll check my local CarQuest to see if they have any. The stuff I have seems to me to be pretty hard,dried out and even flaky, except for the 80 grit which was just the opposite, too soft and runny. But then what do I know. I really wish I could witness how it was SUPPOSED to look and act. Maybe that's the way one of you accomplished polishers can make your fortune...by producing a video showing all the ins and outs. I'm interested in you comments on buffer speed as well. The "machines" I have seem to be on the extreme ends of things, either a variable speed drill which runs at a relatively slow 1250 (max), my electric long shaft die grinder which runs a constant 25,000 or my air powered die grinder which supposedly is variable speed but is almost impossible to hold at any consistent speed other than it's 20,000 max (although as I think on it now, maybe I could rig up a couple of "stops" on the trigger to get it in the 3,000 - 5,000 rpm range). I do have a variable speed Dremel which would work great...but it will only drive 1/8" tools so will only be of use to get the little nooks and crannies. As a result, I seem to be stuck running either very slow speeds or very high speeds...which could be contributing to my problems.
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Old 03-14-2006, 02:47 PM
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Hard dried out and flaky is the tip I needed..the compound needs to be wet so it does not dry out when buffing and make that hard tar deal..How wet will it will take a bit of experimentation to get it right...the black is just part of the deal..your buffs will turn black from the tiny particles coming off of the part..

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Old 03-14-2006, 02:56 PM
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Cboy you have really hit something I've never seen, and with everything you have tried you should have had much better sucess than you have. I would really start to wonder about the compounds now, you should have left your problems behind by now with one of the techniques posted here that you have tried. I'm stumped as to what to tell you now, when you figure it out let us know as we are bound to run into it ourselves one of these days!
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Old 03-14-2006, 06:06 PM
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I used the small cones like the second one you used, and a very small one on a dremel for the tight areas.

As for the WD-40, I just sprayed it on , let it soak a minute or two then used a couple rags to wipe everything off, at that time it still it still looks like crap. When im all done I go over everything by had with a good polish, then everything looks great.

Duke
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Old 03-27-2006, 08:23 PM
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Cboy, This might be a little late although I am not a polishing expert either but I polished a couple wheels at work this past weekend and to get that black stuff off my boss had me take some laquer thinner to it and it worked real good. Hope that helps you
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Old 03-28-2006, 04:55 PM
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CBOY
It seem to me that your compounds are TOO DRY! & your wheels too fast.

Try getting new stuff from a paint & body Supply house not the auto parts store ,because they don't sell as much there for it seems to dry out {sitting on a shelf for how many years?}

The black is gonna happen .

I've been detailing stuff for 20+ years a GOOD metal polish will help in cleaning up the "Black Nasty's"
also rotate your cleaning rags when removing the "Black Nasty's" it seems to come off better in lower humidity like letting wax flash.

I'm no Expert @ polishing {yet " its on one of my to do lists"} but I have had to do some and this is hands down the best line of products for this type of work I have come across.

http://www.flitz.com/products.html

Rcastel has a thread on his muddling through to where he's gotten real good @ it {this is part of my to do list on polishing ;is to read this fully}

Polishing Ron

I also think that 20,000 RPM's is probably WAY too fast turning your medium's {compound's} to burnt.

I would approach it similar to polishing paint. . . Take it & easy

WET sand 400/600/1,000/1,200/1,500 then polish.

the "Flitz" will leave a waxed finish on it so it doesn't tarnish up .

R
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 03-28-2006, 05:47 PM
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Rob, About that speed, 18,000 RPM is what I used with the smaller wheels and cone shaped buffs and 1200 RPM with the 8" wheels. Not that I think this is the right RPM it is just what the tools I had would do. I never had the problems that Cboy had but I did wonder if I would have been better off with a variable speed tool. What about the 18,000 for the buffs is that too fast? what about 1200 for the 8" wheels, maybe too slow? That Sears compound seems to work really good but then it is the only compound I have tried. It is sealed in blister packs and seems not to be dried out and loads fine on the wheel without flaking or crumbling. Any recommendations on a good buffing tool? I mostly intend to buff out another set of wheels and some aluminum cases (alternator, air conditioner compressor ,etc)
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 03-28-2006, 06:05 PM
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I got an Aluminum MB 240D 2.4L 4cyl diesel valve cover that I tried polishing, I bought brown tripollie and white compound, and it has no effect, I did the air cleaner cover just fine with the same products, the old wheel was black and dingey, and glazed over, so I bought a new 1 and have yet to try it, it is 4" spiral sewn.
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Old 03-28-2006, 06:56 PM
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Old Red,

Like i said I haven't gotten to do this yet I'm just using what comes to mind seeing the pictures .

My polish/sander for boats & cars I believe runs relatively
slow I have to go look @ the machine tomorrow but I want to say 1725 to 2400 Its a variable speed Makita.

From what I have read in Rcastles Post is that the grease less compounds are the cats meow.

So Please excuse my ignorance here but I'm under the impression to sand ,sand ,sand,. . . then a slow polish because the picture tells me that its getting way too hot too fast .

Now maybe{just maybe} I have used a product that is a lube for wet sanding & claying{over spray on paint removal}

It could just need some water/ soapy water, some kind of lube to loosen it up just a little.

A lot of times I will water down compound just a little to get it from paste to semi paste.

Wactchoo think?

OK now I'm off to Google
I'll be back

R
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 03-28-2006, 07:17 PM
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Well it seems that I am wrong on the speed of this but some of this I'm not too sire about but HEY you read it & IL find some more!

this is very informative

a couple of things in here I will have to see to belive

MYTHS


R
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Old 03-28-2006, 07:48 PM
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I think this might have already been posted here but any way here you go

R

http://www.caswellplating.com/buffs/buffman.htm
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 03-28-2006, 08:21 PM
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Rob, Now that's some info Thanks a bunch!
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