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Old 04-16-2009, 12:07 PM
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polishin my own parts

hey i want to start polishin my own parts what do i really need 6' or 8' bench grinder? heard 6" are lot harder to use .. need diff bars and pads .. any help needed thanks guys

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Old 04-16-2009, 06:59 PM
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buy a GOOD grinder, I use a 6" chineese piece of crap....I'v ended up making a 4" pad to use on it because a 6" loads it down.

If you want to be serious about it, I recommend buying a arbor and run it off of a 220v motor.
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Old 04-16-2009, 08:01 PM
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What ever you do, be careful and always where safety glasses. Any kind of buffer can hurt you if you don't know how to use it. They can snatch small pieces right out of your hand and throw them across the shop at high rates of speed. They can grab your shirt tail, pull you in and brake your ribs. Don't wear gloves because they can grab the glove and brake your wrist. In a fraction of a second they can grab hold of very rare pieces of body trim and twist them into the shape of pretzels. Just remember the pros make it look easy! A friend of mine was buffing out an original early model corvette wheel beauty ring and some how the buffer grabbed the ring and twisted it up on the wheel. It spun around and cut his thumb off and no one was able to find it to have it sewed back on! If you have little or no buffing experience do as much searching and find as many tips as you can. I have been buffing for thirty five years and I have done it with just about any thing you can think of. Drill presses, hand held drills, converted grinders etc. I have even gone as far as to strap my hand held paint finish buffer to a work table and used it to buff out trim and various different pieces. I do not however recommend this. The best stationary buffer that I have used was one that had a reduction gear in it and it turned about half the speed of the motor. It was real easy to handle and it gave beautiful results. IMO a stationary buffer that turns at a slower RPM then an average grinder, mounted to the floor on a pedestal with plenty of room around all sides is the best way to go.

I don't want to sound like a know it all and I don't want to scare you away from learning how to buff. This is just 35 years experience talking. I don't remember ever hurting myself buffing but I do remember some of the stuff that I have destroyed. One thing that always comes to mind is 20 coats of freshly painted custom lacquered motorcycle gas tank that I had worked on for about three days. It took flight while being buffed, smashed into the wall and landed on the floor. And It was not a safe landing.

Chris
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Old 04-18-2009, 02:18 PM
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I will agree with chris that you need to take all safety precautions needed, I once had a job buffing chrome and I'v seen parts slung across the shop, warped and burned thru from heat, and my coworker broke his finger becuase he was an idiot and ran his finger thru a hole in a small part and it got away from him.

dangerous stuff, no doubt. Read all the material that you can about it before you start and it will give you an idea if it is the right choice for you.
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Old 04-18-2009, 11:34 PM
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Of course these guys want to sell product but this is a good description of the buffing process..:

http://www.caswellplating.com/buffs/buffman.htm

Sam
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Old 04-19-2009, 12:22 AM
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Some years ago, maybe 20, we stopped at a 'Truck' stop for fuel, and food. There was a guy selling Aluminum Polish that was, as described three liquid acid's combined, with a top coating liquid. He said the liquid's, and the top coating were harmless to your skin. It worked Great, and just as described. It took less than 30 minutes to polish all of the aluminum on a BBC Racing engine to perfection, like nothing else I have seen since. Just wipe on, and wipe off, of the 'liquid' acids, and a wipe on, and very slightly hand buff of the top coating.

I am hoping a "trucker" has any information about where I can get it, or if it is still available nowadays.
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Old 04-19-2009, 06:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OneMoreTime
Of course these guys want to sell product but this is a good description of the buffing process..:

http://www.caswellplating.com/buffs/buffman.htm

Sam
Awesome link! Of course I down loaded the PDF and I now have it on my computer. 35 years of doing this and I never thought to make a buffing stand using a jack shaft with a pulley set up as they show. I have at least a dozen electric motors that I have picked up over the years and they have just been lying around. I even have a few go-cart axles that would work great. Now I know what to do with them. Good find!
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Old 04-19-2009, 11:37 AM
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I must say that I am in awe of folks who do their own polishing. I've taken a couple stabs at it and have discovered it is quite a challenge and VERY time consuming...at least if you are a newbie and want to do a really nice job.

Here are some previous threads relating to some specific polishing tips that folks offered me as I was trying to do this...you might find some hints you can use. Also, you can can use the search function to find even more threads relating to polishing metal. These are just a few:

Polishing in small areas or around lettering here.

Problems with compounds and buffer tools here.

Powder coating clear over polished parts here.

Time required to do good polishing here.
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Old 04-19-2009, 02:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carsavvycook
I am hoping a "trucker" has any information about where I can get it, or if it is still available nowadays.
did it separate out after it sat awhile? If so I think I'v seen that stuff before but I never thought it would work to well.
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Old 04-19-2009, 03:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Holder350
did it separate out after it sat awhile? If so I think I'v seen that stuff before but I never thought it would work to well.
NO! It came in 2 separate white plastic bottles, like the liquid waxes come in. IIRC they were 12 OZ. bottles. They lasted 4 years with no problems.

This also reminds me of the LARKIN'S brand of automotive paint polishing products. This was originally designed for the Airline Industry to help reduce ICE, or Dirt build up on the wings. It was easy to apply, and wiped off with ease.

Not to forget the old Tarkelp hand cleaner, that would clean your hands/arms/face of grease, and dirt, and would even remove Saltwater Fish bait smell. This was a somewhat dry paste type hand cleaner, almost a dark pink in color, that did not dry out your skin. It came in a small 'butter cup' size, which I kept, and used in my fishing tackle box for over 9 years.

I compare these products to the 'wonders' of WD40, and K&W products, still available.

Where have they gone? Out with the 70'S and 80'S model cars?
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