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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 08-03-2009, 07:30 PM
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What about using a panel adhesive at the top flange instead of welding??

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 08-03-2009, 07:37 PM
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It is a in and out alignment problem, I don't know why they can't get the repo panels right. The first one I did on a 71-73 Mustang was in 1991 and the panel had the same problem. The last quarter panel skin replacement I did on a 71-73 Mustang was just last year and it was the same. I would think with around 20 years of reproducing these panels they would get it right. I really haven't done too many quarter panel replacements so I don't have too much advice. The only cars I have done them on were two 71-73 Ford Mustangs, one 66 Mustang, a 69 Nova and the bedside replacement on a 84 F150.

I also do the tape thing, it works great for making a sraight line for cutting. I have tried markers and welders chaulk and I always got off the line when cutting. I also don't drill out spot welds, I just cut up to the lip and remove the panel. I then take a grinder and grind on the spot welds and take a screw driver and pry the panel apart at the weld. After I pry a spot apart, I take a pair of pliers and pull the strip loose. It works pretty good and doesn't leave a small divit where you drill the spot weld out. The only thing I have to do is a little hammer and dolly work on the flange and clean it up for the new panel.
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Old 08-03-2009, 11:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadHabitSS
What about using a panel adhesive at the top flange instead of welding??
ahhh someones been paying attention...I restored a carmon ghia almost ten years ago ...I rebuilt the whole bottom of the car and used nothing but glue with drill screws when it cured I pulled the screws and reglued the seam and holes so the glue was like a rivit...five years ago I saw it and it looked good "real good "now its ten years but the guy hasnt been over( he stills owes money) I think it works very well but one tube then was seventeen or twenty bucks....a lot more money but in my opinion its a much better joint and its completely water tight it should last much longer,but.........now its over 40.00 a tube.... and it dont go to far.. it would probably cost 100.00 or so per quarter, at that price I'll use lead.. that lasts forever,more fun too..the other problem I wonder about is a joint that high up is exposed to direct sun and extreme temp. and two dissimilar materials will expand and contract differently,I havent witnessed this but makes me wonder,how long ,so I weld everything .even custom cowel hoods made from scratch its not so hard welding without distortion how do you think they solder ic chips in circut boards without distroying them?By diverting the heat (sucking the heat up before it gets there)
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Old 08-05-2009, 11:36 PM
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What welder could I buy myself to get the job done? After all the information ive got here (thanks again) im thinking I should try this 1/4 replacement myself. I need to start somewhere... I know onebadmerc said this is a somewhat difficult car to do, but I figure nothing to bad could go wrong.. Maybe I should get the car back to my place and give it a try?
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 08-05-2009, 11:54 PM
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If your only looking to do this one car and not more down the road, the panel bond glue is the way to go. The welder and all the incidentals needed to get it up and running(wire, shielding gas, regulator, gun tips, auto-dark helmet, gloves) will run you about $800 minimum just for one of the better 110V MIG machines, you can't do it with flux-cored wire or a bottom level 110v machine. If you think you might do more in the future though, the welder starts to pay for itself, just has a higher initial buy-in.

A lot of the new cars today have entire sections of the car glued together, it doesn't seem to have any problems with weather or temperature, and if it will pass crash standards it must hold up pretty good. A body shop friend of mine glued two 6"x 1" strips of sheetmetal together overlapping them about 3/8" like a lapped seam just as a test. The metal will actually tear apart beside the seam before the glue will let go . In fact, we couldn't get the glue to fail. A lot of modern shops are starting to use this technique more and more as more people learn what it is capable of. Modern 2-part epoxy bond tech is pretty amazing.
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Old 08-06-2009, 12:23 AM
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I would like to do more in the future but also just want to get this car done asap. I do know I dont have $800 right now, I could go for the glue now, price wise that is.. Id like more opinions on it before I decide anything firm. I'll get the car back to my place. Then, ill post pics what im working with..
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Old 08-06-2009, 12:25 AM
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With the "glue" it can all be done with just that, no welding anywhere??
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Old 08-06-2009, 12:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 7StangG2
With the "glue" it can all be done with just that, no welding anywhere??
Yes, as long as the old metal you glue to is solid and properly prepped(ALL the rust removed=sandblasted or ground clean)
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Old 08-07-2009, 12:22 AM
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Hobart Handler 140 mig welder...Good enough for panel replacement? Includes gas regulater and accessories. Some flux core wire and solid wire. Also portable oxy/ace torch kit. Under $500.. I may be able to buy this...
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Old 08-07-2009, 12:59 AM
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Yes, it will do the job, I've got one like it, but don't use the flux cored wire for anything but repairs to stuff like lawn tractor frames or yard swings. It leaves an ugly weld with flux inclusions and pinholes but is suitable for welding outside in the wind. You'll want solid .023" or .024" wire.

A gas bottle of decent size (4' tall) is going to run $100+ to $200 for the initial rental agreement from a gas supplier, but the first $35 fill comes free in it and should easily do your whole job and probably a second car. Just make sure it is always shut off when not in use, even for an hour or two because the system will leak away slowly if left on even when new.
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Old 08-07-2009, 01:17 AM
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Thank you ericnova!

I did look into the glue and I have no doubt this is good stuff. Ive decided to weld though, so im looking around to make a deal on a welder - I still need to replace the other side, and do the floors! It may be a short while, weeks, but ill report back with progress once this 1/4 replacment actually begins.
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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 08-07-2009, 07:53 AM
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Just a suggestion....I see almost new iio millers at pawn shops all the time,thats where I do most of my shopping,and they are complete with little tank and regulator @ 400.00 stay away from flux welders or cheap HF they'll require a pro to keep them operational...millers and lincolns on the other hand almost weld by themselves,...very ez...

Last edited by deadbodyman; 08-07-2009 at 07:59 AM.
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 08-07-2009, 07:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ericnova72
Yes, it will do the job, I've got one like it, but don't use the flux cored wire for anything but repairs to stuff like lawn tractor frames or yard swings. It leaves an ugly weld with flux inclusions and pinholes but is suitable for welding outside in the wind. You'll want solid .023" or .024" wire.

A gas bottle of decent size (4' tall) is going to run $100+ to $200 for the initial rental agreement from a gas supplier, but the first $35 fill comes free in it and should easily do your whole job and probably a second car. Just make sure it is always shut off when not in use, even for an hour or two because the system will leak away slowly if left on even when new.
I'm in total agreement also
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 08-07-2009, 09:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deadbodyman
Of course,you should always wear gloves and a good helper showing up really saves the day
Oh my goodness what a cutie you have there! Keep her protected from harmful stuff!

It is funny I should find this here, I just left another forum where I explained the exact same procedure as you do bodyman.

I do have to toss a warning out there to the newbes, personally I don't cool welds. Cooling welds WILL cause warping if you don't know what you are doing and I stopped doing it long ago. I weld small welds just as described and then LET IT COOL on it's own. I may take a whole day to weld up something like this quarter panel. Find other things to do while your weld is cooling is how I see it.

Cooling a heated piece of metal is HOW you shrink it, so cooling welds is doing the exact same thing. It can get away from you REAL fast.

I have found that letting it cool on it's own is the best way to go. But again, here are many ways to skin a cat.

And by the way bodyman, thank's for the photos I posted them on the other forum to show what I was talking about.

Brian
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 08-07-2009, 12:52 PM
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anything to help Brian,quinching welds isnt so tough though,they do have to cool on their own a little first,They cant be red hot they'll shrink to fast,I'll just quickly quinch in the same order as I welded,on a hood or roof I'll surround the area with wet rags to absorb the heat.Its hard to explain these things at times ,I've been doing it so long the things I just do as instinct I forget to explain, but when you point these out ,it always helps the guy.two heads are better than one,also newbies have some out of the box ideas that sometimes work very well so always ask questions if things arent quite clear BTW it always makes my day when Miyah shows up,she jumps right in and tries to help... BTW 2 be careful grinding welds also ,I've seen many a perfect weld job ruined by overheating welds while grinding,use a 4" stone not a grinding disc, its also much much cheaper.keep em cool

Last edited by deadbodyman; 08-07-2009 at 12:57 PM.
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