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Old 03-07-2012, 09:10 AM
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Reason why most wet/dry papers stop at P2000?

Seems like many wet dry sandpaper manufacturers quit at P2000. I see that one goes to P3000, so it's possible to go higher but my question is this... is it a technology reason (would require technology that is expensive or not available to produce finer than P2000) that they stop at P2000 or is it because that's really as high as a person needs before buffing? Maybe the tradeoff of time makes it better spent buffing rather than sanding after P2000?

I realize 3M now goes to 2500 but it seems like a lot of manufacturers stop at 2000. Curious the reasoning behind this by those who actually do sanding (like myself).
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Old 03-07-2012, 09:23 AM
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My guess would be the expense to create abrasives that fine. I've found 2500 in brands other than MMM but they're few and far between. I think one of the brands I found it in was Mequiars which is now a division of MMM
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Old 03-07-2012, 09:52 AM
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I'm also into woodworking, more specifically wood turning. To get a nice glass smooth finish I'd sand up to 2000 grit and then switch over to Micro-Mesh, which gets SUPER fine, 12,000 grit I believe. Its a bit pricey though, and might cost a bit much to use for sanding body panels.

I know its used a lot in wood working, but I think the solid surface counter top people use it too.

Here are a couple links:

micro mesh manufacture page


5" disk assortment

Sanding Pads

sanding kit


Zach B

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zbcreations.com

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v8beetleresource.com
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Old 03-07-2012, 10:35 AM
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it's called buffing compound
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Old 03-07-2012, 10:49 AM
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If you really want to experiment with finer grit paper, get into model car building. They use anywhere from 6000-12000 before polishing. Luckily they don't have much surface area!
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:12 AM
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The last lacquer job I did (about 15 years ago) I was at the paint store talking about it and the guy goes in the back and hands me a few sheets of 15000 grit. Yes, fifteen thousand grit. He had gotten it from someone in the air craft industry, it was for repairing plexiglass windows. It was 3M, and I have never been able to find any since those pieces he gave me that day. When I painted that car I wet sanded it up to 2000 (it's all that was available) then took out that 15000 and it was AMAZING! I simply sanded it well and hit it with the buffer with fine compound and it was a MIRROR with one pass of the buffer!

Damn that stuff was awesome.

Brian
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:40 AM
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Brian, that got me thinking, I remembered seeing windshield restore kits in my wicks aircraft supply catalog. It looks like they use micro mesh now too:

Wicks Aircraft Supply Micro Mesh Kit

Wicks Aircraft Supply Orbital Windshield Restore Kit


Zach B

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Old 03-07-2012, 11:56 AM
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3$ has micron grade film discs line (not wet dry if I recall) that goes to 1u but I'm not sure what grit that would be. I have some in 15u which is 1200 grit approx. They're made for the solid surfaces industry and are called 366L. They work pretty well for paint when I last used them but I prefer to wet sand vs using a Dynabrade (Don't like dealing with pigtails and I get a better off the sander finish without the orbit).

As far as the Micromesh stuff, their grading is different. It's a good product no doubt but I've used all of their finer grits and it's not the P scale. Their 3200 is really more like P320 in my experience (side by side comparison). Their 36,000 (I think that was the highest) was probably like P2000. So I take their grit scales with a grit of salt

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Old 03-07-2012, 12:03 PM
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Where you at Funk? Slo Reilly usually keeps MMM 2500 grit in the half sheets.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclopsblown34
Where you at Funk? Slo Reilly usually keeps MMM 2500 grit in the half sheets.
Slo Reilly lol. Thanks and You're right, I use them when I get 3M Imperial. I've got a PBE account with them. Pricing is a little on the high side.

It's not so much a sourcing problem as much as a why question.

Seems like most abrasive brands stop at P2000. Even though some MFG's go to P3000 but that's the highest I've seen in a P graded wet/dry and it's almost treated like a novelty item more than something that's used. I'd think if it were possible to easy get a P4000 or higher finish off the sander and without scratches beyond the P4000 grit, it'd be a time savings vs having to buff courser sanding scratches.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:21 PM
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You're right on about the finer sanding reducing the buffing/polishing.
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Old 03-07-2012, 08:35 PM
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The hobby shop stuff might be easiest to to get.
http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXXMZ3&P=7

I think the finest grit inthe pack is 0.5micron?

reference:
http://www.treeringsociety.org/TRBTR...ol51_43-46.pdf
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Old 03-07-2012, 08:59 PM
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Ok just found an interesting little grit comparison chart. Micromesh is finer than I had given credit for above but I still question it. It really seems like their grit numbers were pretty exaggerated by the old feeler test. I wish they'd use real P scale numbers. Micron is also a good measure (probably the best since it's absolute). Looks like P2500 is 8.4u. So 1u would probably be around P4000 or maybe a little finer.

http://www.fingerlakeswoodturners.co...Comparison.pdf
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Old 03-07-2012, 09:11 PM
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trizac 3000 is nice to have around and easy as pie. a bit pricey though.
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Old 03-08-2012, 06:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech69
trizac 3000 is nice to have around and easy as pie. a bit pricey though.
When I used a random orbital it was at the top of my list of good products. That and Mirka Abralon, Sia Air, Fandeli Supreme Foam, Klingspor has a new similar product. They all helped to reduce the scratches. But at $4-$8 per disc!! On the same token, the discs lasted about 3-5 times as long as wet/dry sheets. The foam seemed to help. I just ordered some P4000 Mirka Abralon for my 1/3 sheet inline a couple days ago. I'll be using that again. It's $5 per 1/3 sheet! Ouch. I like the 20-30 cents for 1/3 sheet of wet dry paper a little better.

I'm always wondering about the trade off on when to start buffing and leave sanding. I've got a feeling P2000 and a good cutting compound is probably faster than sanding finer and that's why there's no P4000 or P12000 (real 12000) in wet dry.
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