Repairing Cracked Weld on Radiator - Page 2 - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> General Rodding Tech
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 12-23-2005, 04:44 PM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: tennessee
Posts: 5,913
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
The problem with taking a chance on a "bandage type repair" is that you never know when or where it will fail and the problems caused by failure in this case can run from a minor inconvenience to maybe getting stranded somewhere or worse, a cracked head or block.

On a lighter side, about ten years ago at a mine in Kentucky I had a flat tire on my truck with no way to change it. It was about midnight and well below freezing and all I could find in my tool box was a very coarse thread lag bolt and some silicone sealer(blue glue) so I ground the head of the bolt down thin so it would not stick out so far, squeezed some sealer on it and screwed it into the hole in the tire. I thought if it would hold air long enough for me to make it out to the highway I would be a lot better off stranded by the road than on top of that frozen mountain but the darn thing made it from near Ashland Ky to just north of Knoxville Tn. a distance of nearly 250 miles and was still holding air when I went to the tire shop the next day! Amazing what one can sometimes getaway with when the chips are down

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 12-23-2005, 06:21 PM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: TN
Posts: 438
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Well, I added a bottle of Bar's Leak to the radiator and then let it run for 20 minutes per the directions. As it got hot it dribbled a little, momentarily shot a whisker thin stream, reduced to a slow dribble and eventually dried up.

Haven't driven anywhere yet, so it is still wait and see.

We will only be driving locally till next spring, so springing a slow leak shouldn't strand us if it returns.

Thanks for all the replies.

John
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 12-28-2005, 07:06 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Lake Point, UT
Posts: 8
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Sounds like you've got it taken care of. I've used Aluma-Seal many times for a small seam crack. Don't forget to have it taken care of properly as soon as possible.

BTW...I've also used the pepper trick as well as powdered ginger. Both were used when I was a broke kid in the early 70's and stopped up the radiators just fine. Would not recommend with today's higher pressure systems though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 12-28-2005, 10:07 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Plymouth ma
Posts: 2
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
rustawaydav

this is a reply to a cracked radiator tank. I own a radiator shop. The tank can be repaired ,by a competent radiator repair man, using silver solder. Thanks
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 12-29-2005, 08:22 AM
David Enders's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: very southern Cal.
Age: 65
Posts: 3
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
custom rad

Looks like you've decided to bite the bullet and fix it right. Might take a look at a aluminum one. Try Ron Davis radiators in Phoenix Az. area, I've checked out their wed site and it looks like they can fix you up. I'm cure it wont be cheap but it will be right. Good luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #21 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2009, 11:26 PM
V8 Biker
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Milpitas, California
Age: 55
Posts: 7
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Just did the same tick

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnTN
Well, I added a bottle of Bar's Leak to the radiator and then let it run for 20 minutes per the directions. As it got hot it dribbled a little, momentarily shot a whisker thin stream, reduced to a slow dribble and eventually dried up.

Haven't driven anywhere yet, so it is still wait and see.

We will only be driving locally till next spring, so springing a slow leak shouldn't strand us if it returns.

Thanks for all the replies.

John
Had a slow leak at the bottom of the aluminum radiator from the lower left mount area. So added a vial of the silver Barrs Leak powder that treats up to 3 gallons (mine holds 2.5 gallons) and leak seams to have dried up. This is on a 2004 Boss Hoss 350 bike with 55,000 miles..with electric Water pump. I think the leak stemmed from the bracket beating up againts the tank...must have loosened the plastic/rubber mount isolator, so it was metal beating up againts metal every time I hit a front end bump.

http://community.webshots.com/photo/...03803557zjtDlr

Cheers
Aldo
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #22 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 06:10 AM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: tennessee
Posts: 5,913
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Hoss, since that post was back in 2005 I would think that he has that leak fixed by now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #23 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 08:09 PM
V8 Biker
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Milpitas, California
Age: 55
Posts: 7
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yep I figured that...

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
Hoss, since that post was back in 2005 I would think that he has that leak fixed by now.
Yep I figured that...I posted it just in case someone wanted to offer a better or newer fix.

Cheers
Aldo
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #24 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 08:22 PM
302 Z28's Avatar  
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2003
Location: North Texas
Posts: 10,840
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 86 Times in 73 Posts
oops old post

Vince
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #25 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 10:15 PM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: tennessee
Posts: 5,913
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hosszz4
Yep I figured that...I posted it just in case someone wanted to offer a better or newer fix.CheersAldo


Please don't mis-understand I was not scolding, there is nothing at all wrong with adding good info to an old post I just wanted to make a note of the fact it was old so anyone else who might reply would be aware of it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #26 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 11:24 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Nanaimo, B.C., Canada
Posts: 671
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 3
Thanked 18 Times in 18 Posts
If the epoxy or JB Weld doesn't stop it, as a last resort I'd try drilling the pinhole a little bigger and putting a sheet metal screw and neoprene washer in it. If it's a crack, you could try drilling a small hole at the end of the crack to stop it running any further, and then plug it. Sometimes fixes like that last forever, sometimes not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #27 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 11:27 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Nanaimo, B.C., Canada
Posts: 671
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 3
Thanked 18 Times in 18 Posts
Oh, just read the date on the original post. Goofed again!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #28 (permalink)  
Old 02-13-2009, 06:59 AM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: tennessee
Posts: 5,913
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
That often happens when someone digs up these old posts and sometimes it can be a bit frustrating if you write up a lengthy reply only to find out the question was from years ago, it has happened to me. That's why I mentioned the date and anyone who does reply to one of these ancient posts should think carefully about whether or not the reply is really something worthwhile and PLEASE when you do point out to everyone it is an old post!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent General Rodding Tech posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"Basic of Basics" Welding - How do I repair body panels? Centerline Body - Exterior 33 03-31-2014 10:45 AM
Welding info Kevin45 Body - Exterior 10 08-26-2011 09:09 AM
Question on Mig Welding - HOW to modas Body - Exterior 43 12-31-2005 10:48 PM
Welding Books Magnus_Jager General Rodding Tech 6 11-29-2005 04:57 PM
Cracked weld on strut?? Dave E Shank Suspension - Brakes - Steering 14 02-11-2004 01:20 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.