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Old 01-27-2005, 08:00 PM
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Roof Sound deadener and insulation

Guy's there are some really good threads on interior insulation and I think I have read them all. However I have yet to get a good idea on the best insulation for the roof.

Has anyone used the foil bubble rap stuff on the roof. It looks like it would work real well.

BTW I started using the Peel and Seal stuff on the doors. It looks just like the Brown Bread I have used in the past.

Rick

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Last edited by RickB1B; 01-28-2005 at 07:44 AM.
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Old 01-27-2005, 08:48 PM
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For the cost, the foil bubble wrap works well on the roof. Just avoid using it on the floors.
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Old 01-28-2005, 07:35 AM
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Krist, What would you suggest for the floor. I read quite a few post that recommended the foil bubble rap for the floor.

Also what do you think of the Peel and Seal for the floors. It looks just like Brown Bread so I figure it should work OK.

My plan is to use the Peel and Seal for the floor and then cover with something else to give better dampening and sound protection.

Last edited by RickB1B; 01-28-2005 at 07:44 AM.
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Old 01-28-2005, 09:01 AM
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I used bubble wrap on my floors and did not have a problem. My carpet has a formed rubber backing so I suspect this is what has saved the job.

On my next project I used peel and stick and jute padding. The peel and stick will help with the "drumming" sounds generated by the bigger panels and the jute should help with the rest. Haven't driven it yet so I can't report on the effectiveness. I'm not using a foil layer on the floors in that project because I have no exhaust heat coming from under there.

For the roof I'm also using bubble wrap, whatever you use make sure it's 1) light material and 2) glued up in place very well.. Otherwise, the first hot day you get, the whole thing will come down on you. I'm using the foil-backed bubble wrap as well, with 3M super 90 glue. The contact cement sprayed by real upholstery shops is better, but I'm just not set up for that.

If you're spending this much energy on building a quiet ride, get yourself a can (or 3) of expanding foam as well. Use it to seal off various cavities that could generate noise, like A- and B-pillars. Be careful that they aren't intended to flow air before you seal them off. I have a B-pillar that has the cabin ventilation built into it. I'm sealing off the B-pillar but will put a cardboard tube in there fist so there's room for the air to move.

Hope this helps.

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Old 01-28-2005, 08:35 PM
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I dont recommend any bubble wrap stuff on the floor. The bubbles will pop from your heels and you will have a lumpy or uneven floor, ive seen it myself. I like insulation that is very thin and not "spongy." Peel and Seal works very well, I actually use it as my standard floor insulation now. KoolMat in my opinion is the best available, but expensive. I use KoolMat whenever I can (basically whenever my customer wants to pay for it).
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Old 01-28-2005, 09:06 PM
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We have a different theory on insulation, "Heat rises". Using a foil type product inside the roof RETAINS heat, not letting it dissipate through the roof. We only use sound deadeners on the roof to get rid of the "tinny" sound. I prefer gluing a layer of 3/16 Landau Pad (closed cell foam) to the floor, then jute before the carpet.
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Old 01-29-2005, 08:21 AM
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Thanks for the inputs. I think I now have a plan. Peel and Seal for everywhere but the roof (I'm a little concerned it will fall down). Then Jute over that. For the roof I think I will go with the foil bubble wrap, or maybe the Jute, just want something thin that can be glue'd up there to stay.

BTW interesting point about the foil on the roof, however here in Texas there is no way the roof will ever be warmer inside than outside. Our problem is keeping the heat from the sun out.

Thanks, Rick

Last edited by RickB1B; 01-29-2005 at 08:27 AM.
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Old 01-30-2005, 08:13 AM
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I see the foil on the underside of the roof performing differently than the above explanation. While it is true that heat rises, a huge amount of heat needs to be stopped from entering the interior through the roof. Remember there are two sides to the foil. The foil on the inside under the roof forms a barrier that heat transitioning through the roof is blocked by.

Vince
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Old 01-30-2005, 04:30 PM
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I would think you need to worry alot more about keeping heat from getting into the car through the roof, rather than letting the heat inside the car to pass through the roof.
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Old 01-31-2005, 10:17 PM
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Hi everyone,
I too have read most of the posts concerning insulation. My problem is a little different I guess. I would like to know what everyone thinks. I need the good, the bad and the ugly.

My problem is trying to keep heat from entering the roof of my 1972 Chevrolet Nova Drag car. Even though it is a light color car (white) it gets really hot inside sitting in the staging lanes getting ready to make a run. I have Lexan windows that do not roll down so that isn't an option.

I have come up with a solution that I think might work. I am looking at the silver bubble insulation for the headliner area. Currently the car just has bare metal. The one I am looking at recommends that you use a 1/4" air space between the insulation and the surface, for best results. I plan on glueing 1/4" thick narrow plywood strips evenly spaced to the inside of the roof, then stapling the insulation to the strips. I would then cover the seams with the foil tape that they recommend.

I have been in contact with the insulation company and they thought it was a good idea and told me that approx 97% of the heat that entered through the roof would be reflected back towards the top however, they recommend to use construction adhesive to hold the strips in place. Would this work? My thinking is that it would either stay tacky due to the heat or simply not hold. I know most of the time I have saw people use this adhesive, heat was not a factor. What I need to know is what to use as an adhesive and should I cover the bottom of the insulation with some sort of lightweight material? Looks are not a factor. Thanks for any ideas.

Randy
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