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View Poll Results: Which is better SAE or Metric?
SAE 7 36.84%
Metric (SI) 12 63.16%
Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 02-08-2006, 08:27 AM
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Mikey, Do you have to use an SAE hammer to pound that 3/8" bolt into that 8 MM hole or should you use a metric hammer?

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Old 02-08-2006, 08:34 AM
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thankfully, hammers are a universal fit.
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Old 02-08-2006, 08:36 AM
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I have a Metric Torch & a Universal Air Hammer


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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 02-08-2006, 08:42 AM
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I once saw at Harbor Freight a set of "metric" TAPERED reamers
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Old 02-08-2006, 11:49 AM
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I'll vote SAE since I'm a member of SAE.
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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 02-08-2006, 07:39 PM
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Quote:
What will piss you off to no end is working on Oh say a 85 Chevy Suburban where SAE & METRICS ARE EMPLOYED
It does not matter anymore but what does matter is that you need both sets. You used to be able to tear a complete car apart with 3/8-7/16, 1/2-9/16, and a 5/8-11/16 combination wrenches. Now you need those along with a 10, 13, & 15mm. Add a 1/4, 5/16, and an 8mm now. And it doesn't have to be an '85 'Burban either. Dump trucks and Semis are the same way. Mac even makes combination SAE / Metric wrenches with SAE on one end and Metric on the other.
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Old 02-08-2006, 08:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin45
It does not matter anymore but what does matter is that you need both sets. You used to be able to tear a complete car apart with 3/8-7/16, 1/2-9/16, and a 5/8-11/16 combination wrenches. Now you need those along with a 10, 13, & 15mm. Add a 1/4, 5/16, and an 8mm now. And it doesn't have to be an '85 'Burban either. Dump trucks and Semis are the same way. Mac even makes combination SAE / Metric wrenches with SAE on one end and Metric on the other.

Aww shucks Kevin.... You still needed a screwdriver or two. And, todays vehicles seem to fall apart before we can tear them apart anyway....


In a while, Chet.
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Old 02-08-2006, 08:05 PM
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Ive got this set I keep for rounded off nut & bolts similar to snap ons Flank drive ...Called metrinch?

Id have ta go look but they are supposed to be 6 different drives all in one .

All I know is they come in handy some times

http://cgi.ebay.com/76-pc-Metrinch-C...QQcmdZViewItem



I paid $100.00 for mine brand new from sears wish I would have bought all of them!!!


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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 02-09-2006, 08:19 AM
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Personally it makes no difference to me if they use SAE or Metric as long as they stick to the same. It drives me nuts going from 1/2" to 13mm to 9/16" to 15mm all the time while performing simple maintenance jobs.

Metric System sure does have it's place though, it's a lot easier to remember that with water at 4deg Celcius, 10cm x 10cm x 10cm = 1 liter = 1kg and has a specific gravity of 1.

Now for the hijack of the thread..... what is better to use when using a Grade 8 bolt, a fine thread or coarse? I've seen some prefer coarse thread but others seem to feel with a finer thread you gain more "holding power".
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Old 02-09-2006, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robin58
Now for the hijack of the thread..... what is better to use when using a Grade 8 bolt, a fine thread or coarse? I've seen some prefer coarse thread but others seem to feel with a finer thread you gain more "holding power".

It depends on the application. Fine thread will give you more surface area holding torque than a coarse, and have less tendancy to back off. Each has its place, but if I had a choice, my pick would be fine thread, if only for the added hold and lossof clamp protection.
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Old 02-09-2006, 11:22 AM
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SAE of course....................... it is American plus I have the tools, only buy metric when forced to, and thankfully not that often
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Old 02-12-2006, 08:30 PM
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I say they both have their place, it's not really a matter of picking which is better, it's a matter of having what you need to work on something.

But if somebody were to ask my my opinion, metric is definatly easier to understand, but so is standard if you actually use it very often, it all comes down to math and how good you are at using it in your head. I think there is one thing that nobody has said in defense to SAE sizing, and that is that they are more accurate. Fractional has many more sizes, if you see anybody that has an actual COMPLETE set of standard fractional wrenches and sockets, you would be completely amazed. What would be the metric equivelant to a 25/32nds wrench....probably something like a 19.7 or something to that effect, I dont think they make metrics to that extent. But then again, I may be wrong.
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Old 02-14-2006, 05:35 AM
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The main reason for mixed bolts on vehicles is because most parts are farmed out , this being said depending on were the part is manufactured will depend on the fastener. Get use to the metric system because its coming whether we like it or not.
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Old 02-14-2006, 06:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiss
The main reason for mixed bolts on vehicles is because most parts are farmed out , this being said depending on were the part is manufactured will depend on the fastener. Get use to the metric system because its coming whether we like it or not.


I understand that, but I remember back in the late 70's and early 80's how we had to learn the metric system since SAE was going to be gone within a decade. Seems to still be going. Either system works well, it's just frustrating to have to switch between them on the same vehicle.
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Old 02-14-2006, 06:28 AM
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I keep Metric and SAE tools apart.
If I´m working on the motor the SAE drawer is open and the Metric is open for the rest.
Bad day when they get mixed up.
I had to lug all my SAE tools over from England, in 15 years I have´nt found anywhere that sells them here, yet all our plumbing is SAE based.
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