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View Poll Results: Which is better SAE or Metric?
SAE 7 36.84%
Metric (SI) 12 63.16%
Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 02-14-2006, 07:20 AM
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I wrench on cars every day and just about everything is metric, I don't know when the last time I was opening the SAE tool drawers on my tool box was. If you are wrenching on newer cars and trucks I say Metric if the older stuff is what you do, stick with the SAE. You really should have a good set of both. Too a tool junkie like myself this is a good thing.

Steve

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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 02-14-2006, 08:50 AM
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While viewing this thread I had an idea. If all tools were labled in the same way we could throw them all in the same toolbox drawer (I do that anyway) and eliminate confusion. Put both system units on it. They do it with feeler gauges>.So a 1/2 socket could be labeled with 12.7MM and a 7/16" wrench could have 11.11 MM stamped on it. Similarly a 11 MM could have 35/64" etched on it and a 13 MM could be a 33/64. (I know it isn't exact but it is pretty close) That way we could grab our tool using the measurement system we are most comfortable with. Just a thought, mikey
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 02-14-2006, 09:40 AM
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My VW is 100% metric and my Dodge truck is SAE. It's a lot easier to find SAE tools. I jump back and forth pretty easily. However, I must admit I can not image doing wood working in metrics.
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Old 02-15-2006, 05:42 AM
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Theres a set of tools on the market now, I'm pretty sure its Craftsman, That works off the sides of bolts lands instead of the corners, The wrench or socket will work on SAE or Metric in the same nominal size. I have both complete sets myself, its not to big of a deal once you learn to read the heads of the bolts markings, Now thread pitches thats another ball game in itself, What pisses me off is a fine thread bolt that is SAE, an Metric on the same vehicle an your are looking at the bolt hole an trying to read the threads.
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 02-15-2006, 04:45 PM
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I'm building a 56 Chevy HT pro streeter. Also doing a 54 Chevy pu for myself. The frame work on the 56 will be measured in millimeters as I build. Why? Like some others have said...easy. I fab and paint for a living. All of my prints come in millimeters. Whole numbers. Easy. As for fasteners my sled has all metric as do most of my daily drivers. Already used to it. Do I measure my paint in litres or ccs? No. But ounces are whole numbers too so no big deal. Really, what's the difference if I chop the top on my truck 2 1/2 inches or 63mm? The difference is a 1/2 a mm or like .019-.020". Hmmm... .020" sounds like a nice butt weld gap to me. Damn, just got better And I'm an old grey beard bastid too. Don't fear change fellas.
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 02-15-2006, 05:42 PM
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I grew up with SAE...Canada converted to the Metric system in the late 70s, so we had to get used to it. At that time cars had both metric and SAE bolts on them. Was quite a pain. I still keep a stock of both. You do get used to the metric sizes.

The whole metric system was a pain to get used to. My kids and grandkids think only in metric. I have very little problem with metric....Temperature is pretty easy. Zero is freezing, 100 is boiling. Speed is not bad......50kph is 30 mph.......100 kph is 60 mph...........The only trouble is with the cops. we used to have an unweitten 10 mph over rule. The wouldn't ticket you unless you were 10 mph over. Now, its 10 kph over, which relates to 6 mph over. Another way to take our money.

The only damn thing I cant relate is fuel mileage..............who in their right mind thinks in litres/100km?...........It's miles/gallon..................period.
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  #37 (permalink)  
Old 02-15-2006, 05:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Centerline
Metric sucks. This is the USA where we measure things in inches, feet, yards, and miles. Let the Europeans and Japs measure things the way they want. Here we use SAE.
You americans kill me...................What are you gun calibers measured in?
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 02-15-2006, 06:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poncho62
You americans kill me...................What are you gun calibers measured in?
Inches naturally .22, .38, .303, .308, .357, .45, .44 etc. It's those fancy foreign jobs that come in sizes like 9mm and 7.62mm. However most military ammunition IS measured in metric but only because it has to be interchangeable with other NATO nations with the exception of Naval ammunition, ie.. 6", 8", 12", 16" guns etc.

cal-i-ber

NOUN:

Abbr. cal.
1. The diameter of the inside of a round cylinder, such as a tube.
2. The diameter of the bore of a firearm, usually shown in hundredths or thousandths of an inch and expressed in writing or print in terms of a decimal fraction: .45 caliber.
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Old 02-17-2006, 01:01 AM
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I don't no, it just don,t sound to sexy noing your chicken in Metric, it ruins all the jokes.
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Old 02-17-2006, 07:51 AM
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What about the Brits?

What are the Whitworth/British bolts? I've heard of them, but never had the good fortune to work with them. Please explain.

Jamie
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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 02-24-2006, 01:51 PM
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I like having both sets on hand, sockets and wrenches. It just gives me an excuse to buy more
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old 02-24-2006, 06:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JamieK
What are the Whitworth/British bolts? I've heard of them, but never had the good fortune to work with them. Please explain.

Jamie
You are a lucky man. The british bolt system makes absolutely no sense to me. To find out why, just search" Whitworth bolts" You'll be staggered.
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 02-25-2006, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Centerline
Inches naturally .22, .38, .303, .308, .357, .45, .44 etc. It's those fancy foreign jobs that come in sizes like 9mm and 7.62mm. However most military ammunition IS measured in metric but only because it has to be interchangeable with other NATO nations with the exception of Naval ammunition, ie.. 6", 8", 12", 16" guns etc.

cal-i-ber

NOUN:

Abbr. cal.
1. The diameter of the inside of a round cylinder, such as a tube.
2. The diameter of the bore of a firearm, usually shown in hundredths or thousandths of an inch and expressed in writing or print in terms of a decimal fraction: .45 caliber.
And -- 7.62mm NATO is just a renaming of the good old fashioned .308 Winchester, which was a re-engineering project of the 30-06 for a shorter action.
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  #44 (permalink)  
Old 03-08-2006, 11:47 AM
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Metric is just easier to handle as they come in 1mm steps and that's it. Just use 1mm bigger if a wrench doesn't fit. Those strange 5/16", 7/32" etc. SAE sizes are just not as easy to put into an ascending order IMO; if 7/32 is too small, go figure which is the next bigger size...

Regards
Martin
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  #45 (permalink)  
Old 03-08-2006, 03:15 PM
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I taught tech school for the USAF. "Structures" career field, which encompasses carpentry, masonry, sheet metal (siding, ducts, and gutters), and welding -- the field I've been in for 21 years now (out of 23 total in service -- quitting shortly after 24!!). I had to teach 18-21 year olds 8th grade math for two weeks, and some had to go through a remedial course before that. The hardest things we did were ratios, the Pythagorean Theorem, and FRACTIONS. I can't tell you how many times kids shook their heads and said something like "now I wish I paid attention in school!!"

Metrics are easy, you just have to get used to 'em!! Just remember, there's 2.54 cm in an inch. That's 25.4 mm in an inch, or 0.254 meters. Move a decimal place, and it's something else. We only know feet and inches because it's been drilled in. 12" in a foot came about because some king's foot was that long, and apparently he thought it should be divided into an even 12 parts. If he'd decided 10 parts, at least all the math would have been easier!!
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