Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board

Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/)
-   Garage - Tools (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/garage-tools/)
-   -   Safe heater position for painting? (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/safe-heater-position-painting-128563.html)

cboy 11-20-2007 08:43 AM

Safe heater position for painting?
 
I have a Modine LP heater mounted in the upper corner of my shop:

http://www.hotrodders.com/gallery/da...age_II_042.jpg

I will be painting in the dead of winter this year and need to find some way to keep the temperature in the garage up while I'm shooting. I'm wondering if I moved the Modine so that the back side (where it draws it's combustion air) is either sticking into the next room of the garage OR is sticking through the outside wall, if that would be safe enough to prevent the fumes from potentially igniting. My thinking is that this, combined with normal cross ventilation in and out my windows AND my Jet air cleaner, would hopefully prevent the paint fumes from entering the combustion area of the Modine and that I could run it during the painting process.

The other alternative is to jack the heat up prior to the shoot, reduce the cross ventilation of fresh air, and hope I can maintain at least 60-65 degrees in the shop throughout the shoot. BTW, I just ordered a Hobbyair air supply system with full hood so I think I can get away with a little less cross ventilation than might normally be the case. I still need SOME to prevent the "cloud" from depositing too much crap on the car, but health wise, I think I can afford to reduce the flow of air out of the shop.

cboy 11-20-2007 08:47 AM

Safe heater position for painting?
 
I have a Modine LP heater mounted in the upper corner of my shop:

http://www.hotrodders.com/gallery/da...age_II_042.jpg

It looks like I'll be painting in the dead of winter this year and need to find some way to keep the temperature in the garage up while I'm shooting. I'm wondering if I moved the Modine so that the back side (where it draws it's combustion air) is either sticking into the next room of the garage OR is sticking through the outside wall, if that would be safe enough to prevent the fumes from potentially igniting. My thinking is that this, combined with normal cross ventilation in and out my windows AND my Jet air cleaner, would hopefully prevent the paint fumes from entering the combustion area of the Modine and that I could run it during the painting process.

The other alternative is to jack the heat up prior to the shoot, reduce the cross ventilation of fresh air, and hope I can maintain at least 60-70 degrees in the shop throughout the shoot. BTW, I just ordered a Hobbyair air supply system with full hood so I think I can get away with a little less cross ventilation than might normally be the case. I still need SOME to prevent the "cloud" from depositing too much crap on the car, but health wise, I think I can afford to reduce the flow of air out of the shop.

Also, would an electric heater be safe to run during the shoot or might the fumes passing over the hot element cause ignition?

OneMoreTime 11-20-2007 11:11 AM

Generally in that situation we run the heat up till the metal is warm..then shut the heater off ..vent and shoot..then heat goes back on until cure is acheived..PITA..but what we need to do in the winter..

We use the infrared type heaters mounted on a roll away stand to heat the metal which is the inportant part to help us....also we have the thermometers that are the no-touch type to tell us the metal temp..That is the basic what we do in the winter in collision repair..

Probably one can get by by pointing an infrared heater at the metal until it is warm enough then shut it off while shooting and then turn it back on for the cure..One needs 60-65 + to acheive a good cure of the paint..this is not all that hard to acheive..

Sorry for the long answer..

Sam

CDJr 11-20-2007 11:45 AM

Ya, cboy, I agree with Sam...just heat it up for awhile then turn it off cuz heater + fumes = BAD!

DanTwoLakes 11-20-2007 03:36 PM

Dewey: If you only want to heat one bay of your garage to paint in, why not get two 7 foot electric baseboard heaters ( about $60 for both at Home Depot or Menards) which will warm up that section of your garage in a heartbeat and not present any problem with open flame. Also, no moving air to deposit anything on your fresh paint. My home workshop is heated that way and it works beautifully. You'd only have to use the electric heaters for a couple days, and then you'd always have them to use when you paint in the Winter. You could mount them on low stands, and they'd be portable.

BTW, can I hire you to come over and organize my shop?

35WINDOW 11-20-2007 03:45 PM

cboy,

Please tell us that your Shop isn't always that clean! :nono:

Mustangsaly 11-20-2007 03:47 PM

we warmed my bros garage with car in it, the temp was up to like 78 all night and till noon next day, when it was like 35 or 40degrees outside, we wet the floor and shut off his gas furnace. and put a furnace filter in one window & a fan in another window and shot the car. when done we let it air out, pull filter and fan outa the windows and warm it back up to 60 or so, and let it dry. we tried to pick nicer days like 40s.

Mustangsaly 11-20-2007 03:50 PM

century wire feed welder about like mine. mines gas.



thats a clean shop

cboy 11-20-2007 04:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 35WINDOW
Please tell us that your Shop isn't always that clean!

Bingo! That picture was taken shortly after I finished building the shop...it just happened to include a pretty good view of how the heater is currently positioned. It's much more cluttered now as you can detect in this more recent shot.

http://hotrodders.com/journal_photos...1942328602.jpg

cboy 11-20-2007 04:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes
... why not get two 7 foot electric baseboard heaters ...

Geeze, I can't believe it. There was another paragraph on my original post that asked that very question (would an electric heater be safe) but I must have somehow clipped if off when I entered the post.

Anyhow, that be the perfect solution providing the heating element on the baseboard heater can not ignite any fumes.

Rob Keller 11-20-2007 09:55 PM

I think you heater should be close to the ground.

Heat rises.

Then you need a ceiling fan to circulate the heated & cold air

as far as painting in the dead cold .get it warm check it with a laser infrared thermometer & make sure that your intake air is pre heated.

do not leave any thing that can generate a spark on.

Those oil filled radiator heaters work real good at making radiant heat.

Do some experimenting before you go for the "money shot"



Good luck



Rob :thumbup:

DanTwoLakes 11-21-2007 07:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cboy
Geeze, I can't believe it. There was another paragraph on my original post that asked that very question (would an electric heater be safe) but I must have somehow clipped if off when I entered the post.

Anyhow, that be the perfect solution providing the heating element on the baseboard heater can not ignite any fumes.

There is no "glowing" element in a baseboard heater. The heat comes from a series of aluminum fins, so it can't ignite anything. They also have thermostats ( a few bucks extra) so they will only heat as much as you set them to. Rob's right, the heater should be at floor level, especially the electric baseboard heaters. They could be a couple inches off the ground to pick up cold air.

DanTwoLakes 11-21-2007 12:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes
There is no "glowing" element in a baseboard heater. The heat comes from a series of aluminum fins, so it can't ignite anything. They also have thermostats ( a few bucks extra) so they will only heat as much as you set them to. Rob's right, the heater should be at floor level, especially the electric baseboard heaters. They could be a couple inches off the ground to pick up cold air.

BTW: When the local hospital isn't using cboy's garage for outpatient surgery, it is a little messier than the first picture.

OneMoreTime 11-21-2007 12:27 PM

I still think you guys should use infrared to get the metal warm as that is the critical part....Just my opinion tho..

Sam

cboy 11-21-2007 05:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OneMoreTime
I still think you guys should use infrared to get the metal warm as that is the critical part....

Sam,

One other option I have is that my Modine is programmable...I can set it up the night before I'm going to paint so it comes on a few hours before I intend to start so that not only should the shop be up to temperature but the metal as well. My big concern was KEEPING the place warm during the shoot since I have to be ventilating very cold air in from the outside. I'm also leaning towards Dan's idea because I have a nice use for those baseboard heaters when I don't need them in the shop.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:14 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.