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Old 03-03-2013, 08:06 PM
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Sanded through clearcoat and base...proper fix?

Hi,

I painted my car last September BC/CC. I got 75% of the car cut and buffed, and after all that, being so careful, I still broke through the clear, and basecoat today. I will have to wait for a few months more for the temperatures to allow me to fix my situation. My question is what is the best way to fix this? Also after that long (since September) is there much of a chance for my new basecoat I'll be spraying to lift the surrounding clearcoat thats still intact? I would think the curing process is over by now. Please correct me on this, I'm still trying to learn every time I read things from you guys...you guys are awesome!

The car is black, and I still have basecoat left over from the paint job, so not a problem there, unless the shelf life on the paint/activator isn't that long...

Thank all of you.
Tim

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Last edited by timbo4020; 03-03-2013 at 08:18 PM. Reason: I added more information.
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Old 03-04-2013, 06:10 AM
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Black is an ez one for color match...You have two choices,Base the whole Panel and clear the whole panel or base the spot and blend it out a little Then clear the whole panel, either way you do it you'll have to clear the whole panel...
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Old 03-04-2013, 05:48 PM
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Thank you for the insight. I needed to hear opinions from others. I figured I'd have to do some spot repair in the future, just didn't plan on it this soon! Oh well, it was my mistake.

I even considered doing that spot repair, then sanding the entire car to 1000 grit, then two coats of clear on the entire car for that glass finish. I do have some urethane wave, but for the most part, its looking pretty nice the way it is. I'll add some pics under my profile.

Thanks again, your posts are always good stuff!
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Old 03-04-2013, 06:24 PM
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Mike (Deadbodyman) is right..unless you are experienced in the art of blending clear, (and being black you would almost need to be a magician) you will need to spot in or blend the base coat and re-clear the entire panel. The repair area should be prepped in a fine grit, I would recommend a 600 to 800 grit wet paper and the rest of the panel should be prepped in 600 wet. Your base coat will be fine as long as it was sealed properly after use....if it wasn't, you may need to add some reducer...start off by getting coverage on the areas that you burnt through and then blend your color out about 10 to 15 inches around your burn through (If room allows, if not, your lucky it's a solid color and black the easiest to blend especially seeing you still have the original base coat left over), allow proper flash times between coats...when the base has flashed, apply clear to the repaired area and allow it to flash...after it has flashed, then apply clear to the rest of the panel, 2 complete coats over the entire panel after the repair area has been clear coated (giving the repair area 3 coats) would be fine.

If the burn through is on a rear quarter panel you may want advice on how to blend clear so that you don't have to re-clear the entire quarter, roof and opposite quarter....There are techniques in doing a clear blend of this type and for optimum results, blending solvent would need to be available...on the bright side, you are cutting and polishing the car so if this is the case it would be an excellent situation to learn how to blend clear. If you need help or advice on how to do this, let me know and I'll explain the technique.

Hope this helps.

Ray
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Old 03-05-2013, 08:28 PM
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Thanks Ray! The burn through is on the front fender. This would be the perfect time to experiment with blending. Could you please give me some pointers on blending the clear?

Thank you very much!
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Old 03-05-2013, 09:38 PM
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As I mentioned in a previous post, you would need to purchase some blending solvent...Blending solvent is, for lack of better terms and for ease of understanding, a really slow reducer which gives it the properties to allow the new clear to melt into the existing clear (There is more detail but it's not going to help you blend the clear).

All body shops blend clear, it's a must, if they didn't they would need to paint almost 1/3 of the car if the damage is in a rear quarter and there aren't any cut off lines to hard mask to. There are several different methods of blending clear. The 2 most commonly used methods are the 2 gun method and the stepping down method.

The first step for either method would be to prep the panel for the blend. I prefer to use nothing coarser than 1,200 grit wet for my blend area. Some people may say that this is too fine and the clear won't stick. Trust me, it will stick (have you ever tried getting over spray off of a panel that wasn't prepped at all). I generally prep for clear blends about 18 inches past my last pass of the color blend with 1,200 grit wet...in all directions of the color blend.

When using the 2 gun method...of coarse you would need 2 guns. 1 gun would hold the catalyzed clear, the other would hold blending solvent. Apply the first coat of clear just past the outer edge of the blended color and with the gun holding the blending solvent, mist a coat of blending solvent around the perimeter of the clear that had just been applied...allow this to flash (be careful as any more than a mist coat will cause runs...remember, it's a real slow reducer)...apply a second coat of clear past the first coat and close to the end of your 1,200 grit prep line...again, apply a mist coat of blending solvent around the perimeter using enough solvent so that the prep line disappears. When it dries, if you did it right, you should have an invisible repair. Achieving invisible clear blends when you first start blending rarely happen but, not to worry, let the clear cure, cut the clear (your already at 1,200 grit at the worst) with whatever steps you use for cutting clear and buff. If the clear rolls back when you color sand or buff, either it wasn't completely sanded to start with or the clear hasn't cured. I should also mention that you can apply as many coats of clear as you like, just repeat the steps...I used the 2 coat method because most shops apply 2 coats of clear when doing a repair.

When using the step down method, first apply 2 coats of clear over the color blend area. When you have all the new base coat covered with clear, remove most of the clear from the paint pot and add about 50% blending solvent to the clear (mix the blending solvent with the remaining clear in the pot well) and purge the paint gun by triggering the gun and expelling all the clear that wasn't mixed with blending solvent (make sure that the clear that was just applied has flashed) and apply a coat of the clear and blending solvent solution around the perimeter of your last coat of clear...allow this coat to flash, add about 50% more blending solvent to the clear left in the pot, mix well, purge and apply another coat of clear and blending solvent around the perimeter of your last coat...repeat by adding more solvent to the existing clear until the entire prepped area is cleared...again, if you don't get 100% satisfactory results the first time, not to worry, let it cure, cut and polish the area the way you normally would.

There is another trick I like to use to achieve an invisible blend. All prepping steps are the same...the difference is to apply clear over the blended color area, immediately after, wet the entire prepped area with blending solvent, extend the clear on another coat and immediately after apply blending solvent over the entire prepped surface...repeat until the blend is invisible. This technique works extremely well on small, thinner areas like a bumper cover.

There are several other methods but, I find these to be the most user friendly and for myself I prefer the 2 gun method.

I hope this helps and that I've explained it in a way that you can understand the methodology. If you have any other questions or need more clarification, feel free to ask.

Best of luck and remember, blending clear takes a lot of practice and no matter how much experience a painter has, they don't always bat 1,000.

Ray
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Old 03-06-2013, 04:32 AM
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You'd be well advised to just clear the whole panel and forget about trying to burn (blend) the clear ,not even a well seasond pro will will want to do it with solid black or red because its almost imposible especially when cutting and buffing is involved. and the few that can....Well ask them how many times they screwd up before they finally did it...and you definetely wont do it without using an adheasion promotor...so why bother?just clear the whole panel right from the start or believe me you'll regret it ...
With all the added expence of the extra materials needed plus the extra time of doing it two or three times and finally giving up and clearing the whole panel anyway ,its just not worth it ,even if we gave you step by step instructions and told you exactly what to get theres a 99% chance of failure...So,Unless your an up and coming painter wanting to improve your skills ,Thats a totally different story...
stick to improving the skills that you do have....
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:05 AM
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Originally Posted by deadbodyman View Post
stick to improving the skills that you do have....
I agree with your post up until this last entry. How does one learn unless they push the envelope and try new things? If for no other reason I enjoy this hobby because it allows me to experiment and learn new things. As far as timbo4020's burn though, all the steps have been laid out to either repair or recoat. If he tried to repair and fails, he can still reclear and save it. It's just paint after all.
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Old 03-06-2013, 08:10 AM
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Very nice tutorial Ray!
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Old 03-06-2013, 08:24 AM
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Thanks Bob...With all due respect, Mike is correct, for the amount of time it takes, the size of the panel, the possibility of failure and the additional cost of material, if it was me, I'd take and clear the entire fender...Now that being said, if you want to learn and have the extra cash for materials and the time on your hands, by all means, give it a try. I've tried to outline steps used to achieve an invisible clear blend, I hope I've described the pro's and the con's of blending clear. It is an art, you need to know your equipment and your product extremely well and practice will eventually yield desired results.

I've seen seasoned painters fail at blending clear, I've also seen amazing results in one shop in particular that all they did was "spot repairs", as many as 8 to 10 a day. The choice is up to the OP and as mentioned by "Arrowhead", "How does one learn unless they push the envelope and try new things? If for no other reason I enjoy this hobby because it allows me to experiment and learn new things."

I wish the OP only the best and hope the directions are clear enough if his choice is to try and blend clear.

Ray
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:10 PM
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Thank you guys for taking the time to help me out! It is greatly appreciated.

I have resprayed clear on my drivers door where I had sanded through the clear, but not the basecoat. I only sprayed the clear on and around the burn through. I had very good luck with wetsanding the new clear, and then buffing the entire door. I did not have to apply any basecoat. Is that the big difference this time? Because I have to respray base? I have the entire fender wetsanded to 800.
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Old 03-07-2013, 07:40 PM
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when you spray base coat, your going to have a color foot print larger than the burn through so if you where trying to blend your clear, you would have a larger area to clear than just a burn through...seeing that you have the entire fender wet sanded...you could clear the entire panel...when I blend clear I generally don't prep the whole panel, just to where I expect my fresh clear to end on the blend.

It may be a good idea to take the car outside and look at the area that you burnt through in the sunlight. If you sanded some of the base off it may show up in sunlight...Just a thought, give it a try, if I burn through I always put color over my burn through...just for insurance in case I did remove enough color to make that area transparent.

Ray
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