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Old 04-04-2008, 03:29 AM
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SBC Break in Procedure including Timing....???

Well I dont understand the whole timing thing before breaking in the motor.
I will install the xe268 cam in the OEM setting of the timing gear, Which comp says is actually about 4 degrees advanced since they grind that into their cams from the get go. Then turn the crank/balancer to (insert number here) according to the far left timing tooth. Prime oil pump, Then install the distributor without the cap on and seat it with the thing inside pointing toward the #1 plug. Then put on the cap and hookup the vaccuum advance on the distributor Then adjust the valves by doing this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Somebody
Pick a cylinder.
Bump the motor until the Exhaust valve starts up. Intake is now on base circle.
Loosen the intake lock nut.
WAIT a minute or so, to let the plunger relax.
Twirl intake pushrod between thumb and forefinger (hold gently) and tighten the lock nut until you feel the pushrod stop turning. A little practice is all it takes. You will know - it stops right away, unless you are turning it with pliers. This is zero lash.
Tighten locknut 1/2~3/4 turn.
Bump the motor until the Intake is almost down. Exhaust is now on base circle.
Loosen the exhaust lock nut.
WAIT a minute or so, to let the plunger relax.
Twirl exhaust pushrod between thumb and forefinger (hold gently) , etc...
Tighten locknut 1/2 turn.
Repeat as necessary.
If you go 1 cylinder at a time, you won't screw up or get confused or need a checklist

Then hookup the wires and fire it up to about 2000RPM for about 15 minutes.
Then what. Help appreciated, Thanks

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Old 04-04-2008, 01:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DarknessSpawned
Well I dont understand the whole timing thing before breaking in the motor.
I will install the xe268 cam in the OEM setting of the timing gear, Which comp says is actually about 4 degrees advanced since they grind that into their cams from the get go. Then turn the crank/balancer to (insert number here) according to the far left timing tooth. Prime oil pump, Then install the distributor without the cap on and seat it with the thing inside pointing toward the #1 plug. Then put on the cap and hookup the vaccuum advance on the distributor Then adjust the valves by doing this:




Then hookup the wires and fire it up to about 2000RPM for about 15 minutes.
Then what. Help appreciated, Thanks
Bump.
I know yes Ive searched this is easier for me to understand dontknow
about the whole timing thing.
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Old 04-04-2008, 02:44 PM
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you seem to get it. what is your question???


use diesel engine oil to break in the cam (rotella 30w) or use an eos additive. That cam will go flat quickly if you break it in with regular motor oil.

set ignition timing after you start it up. set it to 30 degrees at 2000 rpm. this will stop the exhaust manifolds from glowing red.
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Old 04-04-2008, 03:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 454C10
you seem to get it. what is your question???


use diesel engine oil to break in the cam (rotella 30w) or use an eos additive. That cam will go flat quickly if you break it in with regular motor oil.

set ignition timing after you start it up. set it to 30 degrees at 2000 rpm. this will stop the exhaust manifolds from glowing red.
Well if the way i posted above is correct, Then the only question i have
is what number do I set the balancer at according to the timing tab before I drop in the distributor facing the #1
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Old 04-04-2008, 03:46 PM
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just put it at zero. the distributor only drops in 8 different ways. the fine tuning of the timing needs to be set with the engine running, using a timing light.

So, before you try starting the engine, get the timing light connected to the engine. make the distributor tight but loose enough so you can still turn it by hand. have someone start the engine and hold the rpms at 2000. then you set the timing to 30 degrees with it running at 2000 rpm, I would leave the vacuum advance off for the cam break in.
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Old 04-04-2008, 05:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 454C10
just put it at zero. the distributor only drops in 8 different ways. the fine tuning of the timing needs to be set with the engine running, using a timing light.

So, before you try starting the engine, get the timing light connected to the engine. make the distributor tight but loose enough so you can still turn it by hand. have someone start the engine and hold the rpms at 2000. then you set the timing to 30 degrees with it running at 2000 rpm, I would leave the vacuum advance off for the cam break in.
Ill plug the vaccuum advance canister on the distributor then...

I thought I needed to get it to that before I started it to make sure
it would start right up? I dont want to chance any cam damage
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Old 04-04-2008, 06:27 PM
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I meant , I thought I needed to get the timing about right before I fired it to make sure it would in fact fire the first time?
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Old 04-04-2008, 06:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DarknessSpawned
Then turn the crank/balancer to (insert number here) according to the far left timing tooth. Prime oil pump, Then install the distributor without the cap on and seat it with the thing inside pointing toward the #1 plug. [/B]
Make sure that #1 is on the compression stroke before you try to start it up.
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Old 04-09-2008, 12:43 AM
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So after the timing is accurately set to 30=36 with the advanced plugged up on the distributor, Then I can just hook up the advance to the carb and not have to time it again?
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Old 04-09-2008, 01:05 AM
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Put it in like they describe. When you try to start it, you'll probably be close enough that it will fire, but maybe not run. If it sounds like its trying to run but can't quite get it going, advance it some. If its kicking back on the starter (sounding like its a dead battery or like its fighting the starter) retard it. It doesn't matter at this point.

You will be breaking in the cam at fast idle. Idle timing is of very little importance. You don't have to get it just right for break in. If you have it too far advanced, it might overheat. If you have it too far retarded it will overheat the exhaust, but it has to be pretty far off in either direction for that. The bottom line is, (and this is how I've done ever engine I've ever built) for break in, time it by ear. Start it up. As long as you don't have the troubles like I listed above with kickback or almost starting, just grab the cap, turn it until you have a good smooth running engine, and tighten it down. If you're worried about finding a fair break-in timing, advance it until it starts running rough, then retard it until it starts running rough, and then pick a point in the middle. If you have it running smoothly, then its neither too far ahead, nor too far behind.

I've actually used this technique many times, and then later when I went to time the engine with a timing light, I found I was very close to the proper setting.

Idle timing settings are remarkably inconsequential since there is no load placed on the engine. I've built engines that had no mechanical advance, meaning I set it at 36* BTDC and that's where it stayed. I've also had higher compression engines that didn't like more than about 10* BTDC. The point I'm trying to make is this: Manufacturers design distributors with a certain amount of total mechanical advance; lets say 24*. They also design the engine to work best with a certain total advance at peak operating load; lets say 36*. So, they determine that idle advance should be set at 36 minus 24 or 12 degrees initial. Its not important that you have 12 degrees initial timing, they just give you a benchmark so you can set it at idle instead of revving the engine with a timing light 3" from the radiator fan.

So, don't worry about getting idle timing spot on during break in. Focus on getting it running, keeping it running on fast idle for 20-30 minutes, then once you're done with that, take it down off fast idle and set the initial.
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Old 01-03-2009, 03:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curtis73
Put it in like they describe. When you try to start it, you'll probably be close enough that it will fire, but maybe not run. If it sounds like its trying to run but can't quite get it going, advance it some. If its kicking back on the starter (sounding like its a dead battery or like its fighting the starter) retard it. It doesn't matter at this point.

You will be breaking in the cam at fast idle. Idle timing is of very little importance. You don't have to get it just right for break in. If you have it too far advanced, it might overheat. If you have it too far retarded it will overheat the exhaust, but it has to be pretty far off in either direction for that. The bottom line is, (and this is how I've done ever engine I've ever built) for break in, time it by ear. Start it up. As long as you don't have the troubles like I listed above with kickback or almost starting, just grab the cap, turn it until you have a good smooth running engine, and tighten it down. If you're worried about finding a fair break-in timing, advance it until it starts running rough, then retard it until it starts running rough, and then pick a point in the middle. If you have it running smoothly, then its neither too far ahead, nor too far behind.

I've actually used this technique many times, and then later when I went to time the engine with a timing light, I found I was very close to the proper setting.

Idle timing settings are remarkably inconsequential since there is no load placed on the engine. I've built engines that had no mechanical advance, meaning I set it at 36* BTDC and that's where it stayed. I've also had higher compression engines that didn't like more than about 10* BTDC. The point I'm trying to make is this: Manufacturers design distributors with a certain amount of total mechanical advance; lets say 24*. They also design the engine to work best with a certain total advance at peak operating load; lets say 36*. So, they determine that idle advance should be set at 36 minus 24 or 12 degrees initial. Its not important that you have 12 degrees initial timing, they just give you a benchmark so you can set it at idle instead of revving the engine with a timing light 3" from the radiator fan.

So, don't worry about getting idle timing spot on during break in. Focus on getting it running, keeping it running on fast idle for 20-30 minutes, then once you're done with that, take it down off fast idle and set the initial.
Great post, I dont know how I missed it. Motor is finally in about to be getting to this point that this post was about.. Got everything adjusted and all will be a matte of priming oil pump, and firing. I have a holley 650 4bb and I need to know how to make the adjustment to where when the truck starts it gets to around 2200 rpm and I dont have to sit in the truck holding it!!
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Old 01-03-2009, 06:09 AM
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I think your getting cam timing and ignition timing mixed as one. Don't worry about if the cam is advanced or retarded. And when plugging the vacuum advance plug the vacuum line not the canister.
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Old 01-03-2009, 08:30 AM
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Go to this Post and scroll down to my first reply. It is #19 and explains how to install the distributor and set the timing.

Next scroll down to my second post in that above link. It is #26 and has another link as to how to adjust the hydraulic lifters.

You can also click on this LINK to go directly to adjusting the valves info.

ADDITIONAL INFO:

Because you are doing a cam break in, after the engine has started, set the timing around 32-36 degrees BTDC at 2500 RPM with no vacuum advance connected. Continue to run the engine in the 2000-2500 RPM range for around 20 minutes. Vary the RPM during this time. Do NOT have the engine idle or attempt to adjust the carb during this time. Watch the coolant temp and the oil pressure and shut down if there is a problem with either. Watch for any fuel, oil or coolant leaks and shut down and correct if found. Having a good 'Box' style fan aimed directly at the front of the radiator can be beneficial during the break in run, especially if you have a clutch style fan. If your exhaust pipes close to the headers begin to glow cherry red the timing is probably somewhat retarded OR you have a major vacuum leak OR are running extremely lean.

After the cam break in run, shut the engine down and change the oil and the filter immediately. You can now restart the engine and begin to make final timing adjustments and/or carb adjustments.

ENJOY!!!

Last edited by Frisco; 01-03-2009 at 08:57 AM. Reason: added info concerning break in procedure
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Old 01-03-2009, 09:31 PM
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main reason you want to get the base timing set, is just so your not 180 off and trying to keep cranking the engine over and over wipeing the lube off the cam lobes. you just want it to start up the first time, your not setting a exact number here, you just want it to run on the first stroke.
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Old 01-03-2009, 09:58 PM
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You guys are making way complicated. Try this, It's what I do.

Set the crank damper so it lines up with the amount of timing you want. Let's say that's 12 BTDC. Drop the dizzy and line up the No 1 tower with the rotor. Timing will be close enough to get you through cam break in.

After can break in...Dump that oil and discard. Change Filter too. After 500 miles, change it again, then cut open the filter and inspect for excessive bearing material.
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