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Old 04-18-2013, 09:01 PM
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SBC HV oilpump

Had my oiling system all figured out for my s-10 engine swap, then we hit a snag. My oilpan will not work.

Thinking I will go back to the stock pan I've run for the last 15 years in this truck but wondering if the stock melling pump will work for my new engine and oil cooling system. I am going to run a C&R heat exchanger radiator and a remote mount oil filter which together should ad a few more liters (i'm in Canada) of oil and a up hill push for the pump to get oil to the radiator.

I know the current pump is a HV pump and realize there are risks when running a stock pan with a HV pump. Will the use of the different rad and oil filter being remotely mounted lessen the problems that occur with the stock pan?


bonuts

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Old 04-18-2013, 09:19 PM
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The pan doesn't cause any issues, lack of drainage will cause issues with a stock or hv pump. Lowering the pressure will help bandaid a lack if good drainage. So will a thinner oil. Both have negative consequences.
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Old 04-18-2013, 09:36 PM
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So the pump cant suck the pan dry if the return ratio of oil is enough to make up for the amount pulled out? OK I can see that,

The oil cooler will effect total volume under flow but not ratio of return to the pan since it carrys on after the oil cooler to the same place in the engine distribution as without the cooler. pressure is not in effect unless we talk delta P across the cooler.

A bigger pan just buys enough time for oil to get back to the bottom,,,savvy

The pan has allot to do with it from either angle that is why you need to add a couple quarts when running a HV55
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Old 04-18-2013, 09:51 PM
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Ok, excellent explanations for sure and a few things I did not think of. Should I just try the stock pump and watch my oil pressure under load? Or any suggestions


bonuts
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Old 04-18-2013, 10:09 PM
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Quote:
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So the pump cant suck the pan dry if the return ratio of oil is enough to make up for the amount pulled out? OK I can see that,

The oil cooler will effect total volume under flow but not ratio of return to the pan since it carrys on after the oil cooler to the same place in the engine distribution as without the cooler. pressure is not in effect unless we talk delta P across the cooler.

A bigger pan just buys enough time for oil to get back to the bottom,,,savvy

The pan has allot to do with it from either angle that is why you need to add a couple quarts when running a HV55
Not if you have adequate drain back. Btw at high rpm a high pressure pump pumps more oil not a high volume pump. And the oil cooler will reduce flow and pressure. If you see it or not depends where you monitor your oil pressure at.
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Old 04-18-2013, 10:18 PM
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Assuming your talking about a V8 or errrrr????.
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Old 04-18-2013, 10:32 PM
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Can't believe I left that out. Yes a 350 sbc


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Old 04-18-2013, 10:48 PM
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If the bearing clearances are up to snuff you don't need a high volume oil pump. Unless your driving around a high RPM's for a long period of time you really don't need a oil cooler on the street either.
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Old 04-18-2013, 10:54 PM
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Not if you have adequate drain back. Btw at high rpm a high pressure pump pumps more oil not a high volume pump. And the oil cooler will reduce flow and pressure. If you see it or not depends where you monitor your oil pressure at.
this is the real world of his question, the engine the OP has may not live with a stock pan capacity of 5 juggs and a HV pump.

I suppose we need to talk about Hi pressure vs Hi volume now? why bother.

the basic idea of running a high volume pump is to ensure capacity at higher RPM's and maintaining the barrier of oil between rotating surfaces and bearings. This is were the HV pump shines. If this thing is going to spinn 6500+ then better use 7-8 juggs and HV, other wise use a good spec'd out GM pump and standard pan

cooler or not

X2 DV, hate that when I dont preview,,,this is an echo. thx
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Old 04-19-2013, 03:35 AM
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Oil cooler not necessary sure I get that. But I have has this spare from my race car taking up space and a truck I have fought heat issues since day one, why not

I will use a stock pump and see what happens


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Old 04-19-2013, 05:52 AM
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The use of a HV oil pump, and restricted push rods keeps more oil in the pan at high RPM and more oil flow through rod and main bearings where it belongs, especially if the rod side clearances are more than .020" per pair. Only use 30 wt or 5W-30 wt motor oil. Must use full roller rocker arms with oil restriction.

I am using a Melling Select 10552 +10% HV pump
Smith Brothers 5/16" restricted custom length push rods
(I am using Comp Cams 8305 restricted push rods - 5/16" x 7.300")

The crankshaft loves it.

Last edited by MouseFink; 04-19-2013 at 06:00 AM.
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Old 04-19-2013, 07:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Custom10 View Post
I suppose we need to talk about Hi pressure vs Hi volume now?

the basic idea of running a high volume pump is to ensure capacity at LOWER RPM's and maintaining the barrier of oil between rotating surfaces and bearings.

If this thing is going to spinn 6500+ then DON'T use a HV, a good spec'd out GM pump and standard pan
I fixed it for you.
You'd be surprised how many people get this wrong.

A higher pressure spring affects high RPM usage, NOT a higher volume. High volume is for low RPM, you can run a high volume/high pressure you'll cover low and high RPM but you'll be putting a large load on the cam/distributor gear interface.
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Old 04-19-2013, 10:50 AM
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Want to add that primarily HV pumps where the ones that the pump case cracked/broke off.
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Old 04-19-2013, 05:38 PM
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Not long ago, we picked up a melling M55. And I had heard the warnings of the case breaking off and these warnings proved true. The first one broke upon installation. Made out of really cheap pot metal. Parts store replaced it, second one was exactly like it and did the same.
We went to see a friend who has many old small blocks in a 48 foot rig trailer.
We checked each one until we found one engine that had a old school M55.
We removed it, cleaned it, deburred the passages and installed the gears out of the new pump. Now we've been running it for about 3 months and the oil pressure's been at 35 psi at idle and around 45 psi at cruise.
I've used the M55 for so long and so many times it made me disappointed in Melling as I've always used their oil pumps. I had hoped they wouldn't go cheap but they did.
And to Custom 10, I don't think your post is entirely a echo of mine, you gave better detail than I did so I return the thanks.
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