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Old 01-03-2011, 02:14 PM
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Scotch Brite Cylinders

I was cleaning a little surface rust from a cylinder in my engine while preparing to replace my heads after it sat for a week and i used scotch brite because i didn't know what else to do, and i noticed it kind of deglazed the cylinder in that area (the engine was ran with way too high of compression and i think they overcompensated with big jets in the carb and it washed out the cylinders because they are glazed, but it didn't burn oil through the rings, just the valve seals)

the engine appears almost new, i replaced the cam and the bearings barely looked broken in so i don't want to tear the engine down.

if i scotch brite the rest of the cylinders completely will it help me or hurt me?

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Old 01-03-2011, 02:35 PM
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But i want to clarify, I do not intend to pull the pistons and change the rings if i do this. that is why i would use scotch brite to deglaze it instead of taking the motor apart and doing it right
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Old 01-03-2011, 02:46 PM
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You are wasting elbow grease! ..."IF" you're putting in new rings you'll NEED to re-hone the clyinders.
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Old 01-03-2011, 02:49 PM
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I read somewhere scotch brite is a no no around an engine
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Old 01-03-2011, 03:04 PM
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i was just randomly googling earlier and i read a few places where they said sometimes it's acceptable to use the pads on the bores to deglaze the cylinders. i even read that some motorcycle builders use that instead of honing on purpose for performance.

also i read that the hex marks from honing are to hold a small amount of oil between the rings and the cylinder wall so i thought that if i were to scotch brite my cylinders it might help.

but if i won't gain anything i wont, and i can try to polish the marks out from cleaning the rust if i have to
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Old 01-03-2011, 03:18 PM
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Never use scotch-brite to clean a engine you will get little particles all through the engine that you can't even see it can get in the bearings and in the oil pump and really screw a engine up. I know people do it all the time and i have done it in the past but no more for me anyway. I had a friend do it and i told him not to and it wasen't long till he had to tear his engine back down and found particles in the oil-pump and through out the engine. JMO
You do it if you want to or feel comfortable doing it , Never know you might get lucky But if your not then remember you were told. JMO
but the thing is you are talking about doing the cylinders with it. I just don't see how you can get it all out. IMHO Some people might say different but i am just stating what can happen that's all.

Cole
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Old 01-03-2011, 03:21 PM
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is it bad that i used it in the one little spot of rust? i thought scotch brite material would be better than using steel wool.

is there anything i should try to deglaze the cylinders? or will it not give me any problems in the future if it's not giving me problems now?
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Old 01-03-2011, 03:52 PM
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Old 01-03-2011, 05:28 PM
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X2 on the berry bush.


Cole
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Old 01-03-2011, 05:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by recnepswilliams
i was just randomly googling earlier and i read a few places where they said sometimes it's acceptable to use the pads on the bores to deglaze the cylinders. i even read that some motorcycle builders use that instead of honing on purpose for performance.
I"m sure they meant to prep a jug, not an assembled motor, where they could wash and wire brush it when done.
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by recnepswilliams
i was just randomly googling earlier and i read a few places where they said sometimes it's acceptable to use the pads on the bores to deglaze the cylinders. i even read that some motorcycle builders use that instead of honing on purpose for performance........

GREAT example of garbage one can find on the internet. The best thing to deglaze bores with is a berrybush hone (as posted by Jake).

In any case, the bore(s) and block should be cleaned thoroughly after any kind of deglazing is done. The deglazing tool is designed to break down while in use and those abrasive particles are not engine-friendly.

tom
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Old 01-03-2011, 07:43 PM
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Unless you masked off the rings with tape to prevent particles getting into the ring lands you may have caused more trouble than you solved. Scotchbrite is too fine to do any kind of bore prep other than cleaning the surface which is what it sounds like you were doing.

The problem is the particles are abrasive mixed with a plastic matrix and if that gets into the ring lands or worse inside the motor it can cause a lot of damage...especially to the bearings which are soft.

If you just did one cylinder I would remove the piston from that bore and clean the piston and ring assy well with solvent and blow it out, a wipe of the cylinder bore is probably all you need since the particles won't have found their way into the lower end. You will likely find a lot of particles in the ring lands so pay special attention to this area.

The main issue with Scotchbrite is its a lot like sand when it breaks down and unless your careful it can easily get where you don't want it. I have even seen melted scotchbrite plastic foul a ring land once because the owner thought doing the bore like you did wouldn't hurt anything...of course he sprayed the piston down with contact cleaner which sent all the particles down to the first and second ring lands which made a mess. This was on an air cooled snowmobile so the damage wasn't catastrophic but the melted scotchbrite seized the rings in the lands and the motor lost all compression on that cylinder. I had to replace the piston on that engine because the ring was so tight I couldn't get it out of the groove...it was like the plastic scotchbrite particles and abrasive made the ring a press fit once exposed to the heat of combustion. Luckily the bore was fine but it could have been much worse if it had happened at high rpm instead of idling in his driveway at which point he brought it to me.

Clean out the mess before it gets worse, it doesn't take long to pull a newer piston to clean it out since there is likely no ridge yet...pull the pan and do yourself a favor by not rolling the dice. Leaving the particulate in there and starting her up is like russian roulette...she might seize...she might not.
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Old 01-03-2011, 09:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by recnepswilliams
also i read that the hex marks from honing are to hold a small amount of oil between the rings and the cylinder wall so i thought that if i were to scotch brite my cylinders it might help.
The crosshatch pattern you see in newish cylinders, is made to a specified angle based mostly on what type of rings being used. Not too sure a person with a scotchbrite pad can replicate it reliably.
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Old 01-03-2011, 10:06 PM
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This is an interesting proposition. In my old 1959 edition MOTORS MANUAL, in the Chevrolet six cylinder engine section, where they talk about deglazing cylinders, it says, "in the absence of a cylinder hone, emory/crocus cloth can be used". I'm sure that was for an empty block, and then cleaned, but it just seemed so "caveman". It probably would have been best just to leave the rust, and treat it like a locked up block from sitting too long. Use penetrants to loosen, and crank the motor over; it'll take care of itself.
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Old 01-03-2011, 10:17 PM
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would steel wool do any better to clean rust out of a cylinder?

the problem was that summit told me to return my heads before i had new ones shipped, so i had to wait a few days and the temp changed drastically and even though i lubed the cylinders one still rusted up.

so i talked to summit tech support and he told me i would need to clean it with steel wool and a penetrant so i guessed that scotch brite would be a better alternative.

I held a shop towel in the bottom of the cylinder when i did it, and i had it sprayed with wd-40 so it didn't seem to make much dust and before i put it together i planned on going around the top of the ring with an air compressor hose and blow it out of the top into a shop towel. would this not be enough to clean my scotch brite mistake?
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