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Old 02-09-2005, 08:32 PM
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Searching for a 350 block

Well, I'm going to start calling around this weekend to look for a block. I'm looking for a 4 bolt main 350 block to rebuild to a 383 stroker.

I've never bought a block before, so you guys will have to help me. Since I'm just wanting the block, should I get an engine with the extra parts on it..carb, heads, etc? They'll probably get replaced with aftermarket parts anyways.

Are there any kinds of wires or sensors that should be included that I will need to look for?

Is rust a factor? I know surface rust can be sanded off, but should there be any rust at all?


Thanks for the help guys!

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Old 02-09-2005, 08:45 PM
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Journals

Start doing research on journal sizes. The 350's had medium journals, which should work fine for a 383. The medium journal blocks have a better supply of parts available. When buying any used or after market parts, you will want to pay attention to journal size and other compatibility issues. Small journal blocks tended to be 327's (just maybe 302's) which might have had four bolt mains adapted to them from two bolt, and they are typically older blocks. Some newer blocks are specialized race blocks with smaller or larger journals and the parts for them are custom or otherwise expensive. The idea is to confirm that you are potentially puchasing a standard 350 block which your average stroker 383 crank will fit. Standard straight four bolt mains with cast iron caps should be about what you are looking for cost-effectiveness-wise, especially with a stroker crank to be installed in a used block in a performance application.

Last edited by Scorpio Shaping Flow; 02-10-2005 at 09:16 PM.
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Old 02-09-2005, 09:22 PM
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what exactly are journals?
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Old 02-10-2005, 12:16 AM
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buying a block

If you buy a block with the heads. Check the casting #s first. You don't want a set of 76cc heads.
Might as well get what free parts you can. Bolts, balancer, tin. It all costs to replace.
Make sure lifter valley has no warps, cracks, or bulges.
Make sure there is no warpage behind timing chain.
Make sure there is no block scarring from the upper timing sprocket.
Make sure the starter mount horn is not broken or cracked.
If you live in a cold climate. Make sure there is antifreeze in the block, not water.
Check for excessive cylinder wear. The more ridge, the larger you will have to bore.

PS: I'd build a 2 bolt just as easily as a 4 bolt. There are lots of postings on the pros and cons.
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Last edited by bracketeer; 02-10-2005 at 12:24 AM.
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Old 02-10-2005, 07:45 AM
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ANY, stock small block you buy, built after 1971 will have 75-76cc heads. Look for all the crack areas , as mentioned. If you want a real good block. Look at the cam area. Look for a camshaft bore that is in the center of the raised casting around it. This one factor can determine if the cylinder walls are uniform in thickness.

Journal is a term used for the crankshaft main bearing surface. Small journal 1955-1967. Medium journal cranks were built from 1968, except for the 400 series. These are large journal.

You may run into some confusion, as many people regard the 68 and later block as the large journal block. The 400 being a short production run and getting scarce.
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Old 02-10-2005, 07:17 PM
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Looks like you have have lot more research to do Eric.

Chris
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Old 02-10-2005, 09:52 PM
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Heads

For heads, you'll want 2.02 inch intake valves on a 383 performance engine, matched with the 1.60 inch enhaust valves. These heads might have 64CC chambers, which were pretty standard back in the sixties. On a 383, you would have to use dished pistons to keep compression down anyway, so 76cc chambers are fine. These pistons are common for stroker kits. 76cc heads would be more common on a junk engine these days anyway, but would often be found with 1.94 inch intake valves and 1.50 inch exhaust valves, which weren't bad for shorter stroke engines and still ok for 350's. The 76CC heads would lower compression ratio, which isn't a bad idea for a street engine. Stroking an engine increases compression ratio anyway, so match pistons to head for desired compression ratio (about 9.5 to 1 for street, with less than about 250 degrees cam duration at .05" lift - max). Look for junked early seventies performance cars like Nova SS's, Camaros, or Corvettes for good used heads on a descent block, or police package cars maybe.

Last edited by Scorpio Shaping Flow; 02-10-2005 at 10:15 PM.
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Old 02-10-2005, 10:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Malibucdl
Looks like you have have lot more research to do Eric.

Chris
that's why i ask dumb questions every so often, i don't want to look stupid all at once!
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Old 02-10-2005, 11:05 PM
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Here are some facts from a guy thats been buying core motors for over fourty years... All used motors "were just rebuilt", came out of the fastest car around/Corvette. Was nothing (much) wrong with it when pulled. Ran last week. used no oil. was so quiet that you had to roll the windows down to hear it. It's an 010 so it's a four bolt!

There is no way to tell if a complete block is two or four bolt unless it was built before 1967(two bolt small journal). 010 blocks were about the longest running series of castings made in small blocks. Available in 302-327-350. Two and four bolt. 68-late seventies. You gotta pull the pan!!

Take a list of head casting no's. (Mortec) with you. This will give you some indication of the year of the block. And what valve sizes to expect. Heads before 1976 are not for unleaded gas. ALL 882's are to be considered cracked, same goes for 624's. all post 87 305-350. And all 400 cube heads!! You will get a better price and they usually are cracked!!

Two barrel motors are usually in better internal shape.. (unless they came from a demo-derby car). But most lack the larger valves and four bolt lower end.

Very few small block 350's have steel cranks, almost none after about 1980. Very few one piece rear main blocks are four bolt and even rarer is a steel crank. All the 305-350 heads from 87 on are junk! for hi=performance.
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Old 02-11-2005, 02:28 AM
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L48 350 Was The First

The L30 engine design is functionally very similar to its progeny, the L48; in most cases they used the same components. In reality the L48 engine is best described as a long-stroke L30! Both engines shared the same block castings (usually), heads, intake manifold, exhaust manifolds, camshaft, and carburetor. The L48 got its 20 extra gross horsepower almost exclusively from the 23 extra cubic inches resulting from the longer stroke, though the fractionally higher compression ratio (10.25:1 as compared to 10.0:1), a byproduct of the change in stroke and piston compression height, was a marginal aid.17 The L48 crankshaft was obviously different due the longer stroke; less obviously different were the pistons. The pistons from both engines were similar in design; both being flat-head, slipper-skirted, pressed-pin, cast aluminum-alloy pistons with valve relief's on the head. The main difference between the pistons was simply the compression height (changed in the L48 from 1.675 inch to 1.565 inch, to accommodate the change in stroke), which caused other related cascading minor changes in the piston geometry. Rods were 5.7-inch long and of forged steel in both engines.

The 1967 small-journal L30 crankshaft, casting PN 3884577, was forged steel as was the L48 crankshaft. In 1968 the large-journal L30 crankshaft material was switched to nodular cast-iron, casting PN 3941174. L48 used casting PN 3892690 in 1967 and PN 3941182 in 1968),18 with premium aluminum-alloy steel-backed bearings, upgraded from the copper-lead or Babbitt-metal steel-backed bearings used in the base 327ci-210HP engine. In 1967 Chevrolet began transitioning to a larger main bearing journal in its small-block engines. The new 350 engine was the first to receive the 2.45-inch journal. The remaining small-block engines, including the L30, did not upgrade from the 2.30-inch journal size until the 1968 model year.

The L30 and L48 block and head casting numbers documented by Colvin are shown in the tables below:


Engine Block Castings Year Block Casting Number Camaro Usage Comments
(All are 2-bolt main blocks)
1967 3892657
327-210HP
327-275HP
302-290HP
350-295HP Small journal crank, except 350
3903352 Small journal crank, except 350

1968 3914660
327-210HP
327-275HP Large journal crank

3914678
327-210HP
327-275HP
302-290HP
350-295HP Large journal crank

The 350 was intruduced for the 1967 Camaro SS as a two bolt main, large journal engine at 2.45" (medium journal with the 400's 2.65" as large). The heads were 1.94 inch intake valve, 1.5 inch exhaust valve, 64CC chamber volume spec. The engine was rated at 295HP.

I would estimate that a 383 stroker kit with flat-top pistons would yield approximately a 9.2 to 9.5 compression ratio with 76CC heads.

Last edited by Scorpio Shaping Flow; 02-11-2005 at 02:24 AM.
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