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  #166 (permalink)  
Old 05-18-2010, 02:42 PM
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HOT ROD...... FROM A CHRYSLER?
 
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The review is almost correct.

They work but not very well.
Here in Canada we don't have an Uncle Sam, we have Mother Hen who doesn't allow us to have anything good.
I have not seen a good rust remover ever up here.
I just talked to a body guy and he says he's never seen anything decent either.

All the good stuff is in the States.

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  #167 (permalink)  
Old 05-18-2010, 08:05 PM
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in Russia too)) I read some Russian forums and they have similar stuff too, like phosphoric acid, rust converter etc. and those work. Anyway I hope I removed that deadly acid with baking soda alright, now I found a can of naval jelly on ebay for 15$ and I'm going to order it for the future.
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  #168 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2010, 01:13 PM
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It seems most of this thread is geared toward larger, more easily accessible surfaces, and that's fine. But what about a small steel part, that is heavily pitted, and the most heavily pitted surfaces are in a "valley" which I can't really get a wire brush to. Thus, I need to rely on a chemical process to "dissolve" the rust as much as possible. Certainly, I can then rely on a chemical process to neutralize the acid as well - I'd probably immerse for both procedures.

Suggestions? I've got muriatic and phosphoric acid (Captain Lee's) at my disposal.
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  #169 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2010, 07:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DPDISXR4Ti
It seems most of this thread is geared toward larger, more easily accessible surfaces, and that's fine. But what about a small steel part, that is heavily pitted, and the most heavily pitted surfaces are in a "valley" which I can't really get a wire brush to. Thus, I need to rely on a chemical process to "dissolve" the rust as much as possible. Certainly, I can then rely on a chemical process to neutralize the acid as well - I'd probably immerse for both procedures.

Suggestions? I've got muriatic and phosphoric acid (Captain Lee's) at my disposal.
Muratic acid will cause hydrogen embrittlement to a much greater degree than the phosphoric acid will.

Have you researched chelation? If you can immerse you can use chelation and not have any hydrogen embrittlement.
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  #170 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2010, 07:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Fool
Have you researched chelation?
Nope, not at all. I can search but if you've got a link or any details you'd care to share, I'd welcome them.
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  #171 (permalink)  
Old 12-13-2010, 02:54 PM
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Good thing I read this thread...

I am changing the 1/4's on my car and the flanges where the new panel mounts have a lot of surface rust, some pitting, and an area or two where they are rusted through.

I've been using a product called Picklex 20, which seems to work well. What I like about it is that the directions say it does not need to be rinsed. What i don't like is that it is a thin consistency, and wouldn't stay on vertical surfaces very well.

I had worked on the various rusty spots for hours and ended up with lots of the black stuff, I believe was identified in the thread as possibly "zinc oxide", or maybe "iron oxide".

I went and got some navel jelly, and it seems to be about the same as the picklex as far as breaking down the black stuff, i. e. it is still slow going, lots of wire brushing needed, but it is nice that it pretty much stays where you put it.

I still don't have all the black stuff off though. When I do the other side, I'm going to make more of an effort to get the rust off before using any of the phosphoric acid based treatments as I think the rust is not nearly as tough as the iron oxide, if that is what this black stuff is.

How critical is the washing of the naval jelly? I used a sponge and 5 gallon bucket of water. After it tried the surface had a white chalky haze on it.

I'm curious if phosphoric acid stops completely at clean metal, or just really slows down when it gets to clean metal. I' think both have been stated in this thread.
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  #172 (permalink)  
Old 12-14-2010, 12:57 PM
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Just did a little on-line research about the Chelation rust-removal process using molasses. I'm about to give it a try - I'll report back in a couple weeks, but in the mean time here's a link w/ a before/after pic....


http://www.inetogether.org/jaguar/060703.php

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  #173 (permalink)  
Old 08-21-2011, 03:07 PM
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I've searched this thread, and I couldn't find the answer.
Why soapy water, and not just warm water?
Also, is it the soapy warm water that we use to keep the jelly wet, or do we have two misters - one with plain warm water for keeping the jelly moist, and a soapy one for the final neutralizing rinse?
And finally, what kind of soap for the soapy water, Dawn?

Thanks
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  #174 (permalink)  
Old 08-21-2011, 05:10 PM
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I use vinegar to remove rust from small parts.
It works really well, and leaves a black coating
on the part which is probably iron phosphate.

With bolts, I submerge everything in a jar of full strength
vinegar for about 2-3 days, remove, rinse and dry.

Cheap, effective and safe.
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  #175 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2011, 11:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy Ferguson
Some say it's flash rust, other say it's just the color it is when it dries, that there's no rust present. I normally end up with a bluish color when it dries. I neutralize the acid with water, followed by lacquer thinner. I've also had problems with primer not adhering in the past, so I now always sand the bare metal just prior to priming with 180 grit on a DA to remove the layer left by the naval jelly. This process has always given excellent results. No more loss of adhesion since I started doing it this way.

Randy
Hi Randy A real newbe not like most of these guys that have been painting for long time. lol
After you sand the last time with 180 DA sander which setting D or A or don't it matter and what do you use to wipe down befor you spray Epoxy Primer
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  #176 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2011, 12:46 PM
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Hi, this is an old thread and Randy has not been around in a long while..use the double action and I wipe down with wax and grease remover (waterborne) and then immediately apply my epoxy primer and then no more rust worries..

Sam
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I have tried most all of it and now do what is known to work..
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  #177 (permalink)  
Old 09-23-2011, 03:59 PM
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Hi Sam
I new it was old ,but I though I try for ans any way.
thank you for ans.
arlo
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  #178 (permalink)  
Old 09-24-2011, 08:07 AM
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rust removal

In case you missed it elsewhere - follow the directions on the W&G remover, don't let it dry on the surface, and allow some "venting" time before you paint over it.
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  #179 (permalink)  
Old 09-24-2011, 10:36 AM
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We have recently had some issues at the shop with the painters spraying over the cleaned surfaces before letting the residual W&G remover fully evaporate. This is VERY important and not only that but don't put your hands on the car as you are wiping, this is another point that caused some problems.

Wipe small areas and dry it well and then let it fully evaporate before proceeding.

Brian
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