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-   -   Sedan delivery interior update. (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/sedan-delivery-interior-update-171849.html)

cboy 01-22-2010 11:25 AM

Sedan delivery interior update.
 
I've been plugging away at the interior work and thought it might be time to show some progress pictures. As usual, full details and many more pics in my journal.

The side panels and rear corner of car.

http://www.hotrodders.com/gallery/da...bric_4_004.jpg

View toward rear.

http://hotrodders.com/journal_photos...2606719652.jpg

Headliner and overhead console - viewed from rear.

http://hotrodders.com/journal_photos...2606720512.jpg

Door panel.

http://hotrodders.com/journal_photos...2611042970.jpg

Center console and transmission tunnel.

http://hotrodders.com/journal_photos...2616223941.jpg

Carpet going in.

http://hotrodders.com/journal_photos...2616226840.jpg

Carpeting binding, matts, firewall, removable toe board, and "foot box" (by driver's door) completed. Oh, and my handy dandy beverage holder at the back of the foot box.

http://hotrodders.com/journal_photos...2627122501.jpg

And the buckets.

http://hotrodders.com/journal_photos...2641790311.jpg

http://hotrodders.com/journal_photos...2641789842.jpg

Still a lot of detail and re-assembly work to do...but it's getting there.

eloc431962 01-22-2010 01:44 PM

That's really looking good cboy :thumbup: . I really like what you did with the door panels :thumbup:


Cole

FASTFORD 01-22-2010 03:55 PM

WOW ! looks great :thumbup:

S10xGN 01-22-2010 04:30 PM

Question: What's the recessed diamond-plate box for?

Russ

302 Z28 01-22-2010 05:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by S10xGN
Question: What's the recessed diamond-plate box for?

Russ

Probably a Browning 9mm would be my guess :D

Vince

cboy 01-22-2010 05:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by S10xGN
Question: What's the recessed diamond-plate box for?

That's my "foot box". This is a clutch car, so I wanted a little extra room for my left foot to operate the pedal and give my leg a little more space to move around.

douglee25 01-23-2010 09:15 AM

Great job on the seat!

Question - Why did you staple the welt during assembly vs. sewing the welt onto the fabric?

Doug

cboy 01-23-2010 11:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by douglee25
Question - Why did you staple the welt during assembly vs. sewing the welt onto the fabric?

I'm a complete rookie at this so I rely on a lot of crutches that a more experienced person would not need. I use the staples much like a seamstress might use pins to temporarily hold the fabrics together to insure they don't move out of position. There's a lot to concentrate on while running the panels and welting through the sewing machine, so the staples help me eliminate one of those worries. The stitching provides the bond...the staples are just extra fingers to hold things in place until the thread can do its job.

One certainly could sew the welting on to one or the other panel before sewing the two panels together, but that seems like an extra step to me. And even if I had done it that way, I would STILL have stapled the cord to the one panel first...just to make sure it stayed in line while I sewed. These seats came from the factory with one single stitch binding the two panels and the welting in between, so I figured the single stitch method would do the job for the new covers.

But again, from my very limited knowledge and experience, there's nothing wrong with doing it the way you suggest.

DanTwoLakes 01-23-2010 08:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by douglee25
Great job on the seat!

Question - Why did you staple the welt during assembly vs. sewing the welt onto the fabric?

Doug

There are two ways of doing it. You could sew the welt first and then sew it on the fabric, or sew the welt to the fabric in one step. Either method is acceptable, but the fewer stitch lines the less stress and the less needle holes in the whole assembly. In either case, the welt needs to be sewn to one of the panels first before sewing on any other panels. If you don't do it that way, you may not get the welt sewn tightly to both panels. After you're done sewing, you should not be able to see any part of the stitching next to the welt. Because vinyl, leather, and Ultraleather are thick fabrics, I use 4/32 welt cord so the welts don't look so big.

douglee25 01-24-2010 07:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cboy
I'm a complete rookie at this so I rely on a lot of crutches that a more experienced person would not need. I use the staples much like a seamstress might use pins to temporarily hold the fabrics together to insure they don't move out of position. There's a lot to concentrate on while running the panels and welting through the sewing machine, so the staples help me eliminate one of those worries. The stitching provides the bond...the staples are just extra fingers to hold things in place until the thread can do its job.

One certainly could sew the welting on to one or the other panel before sewing the two panels together, but that seems like an extra step to me. And even if I had done it that way, I would STILL have stapled the cord to the one panel first...just to make sure it stayed in line while I sewed. These seats came from the factory with one single stitch binding the two panels and the welting in between, so I figured the single stitch method would do the job for the new covers.

But again, from my very limited knowledge and experience, there's nothing wrong with doing it the way you suggest.

Ok, I figured as much but just checking. Good job no matter how you got it done.

Doug

douglee25 01-24-2010 07:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes
I use 4/32 welt cord so the welts don't look so big.

Good tip. Thanks.

Doug

DanTwoLakes 01-25-2010 10:20 AM

5 Attachment(s)
This was part of c-boy's original post: "These seats came from the factory with one single stitch binding the two panels and the welting in between, so I figured the single stitch method would do the job for the new covers."
Only the most experienced production line sewers would have been able to do it this way. The original seat cover may have had pre-made extruded welt in it, which would have made doing it that way a little easier, but it would not be advisable for a beginning sewer to try to sew two panels with a loose welt in between together all at one time. There are just too many things that can go wrong, so I strongly advise you to not try doing it that way.


Here's some pictures of the welting process: This is a simple barber chair seat, but the principles are the same. You can either sew the welt first and then sew it to the seat top, or do what I am doing, sew the welt as you sew it to the seat top. The smoother you get the welt sewn to the seat top, the easier it is to upholster, and the better the finished product will be. I made the relief cuts in the welts after they were sewn to the seat top. I try to sew the welts as straight into the sewing machine as possible.

DanTwoLakes 01-25-2010 10:26 AM

5 Attachment(s)
After the welts are sewn on, the side bands are sewn on. I am sewing with the the band on top here. As I do this, I am trying to angle the band and welt so that the welt and the two pieces of fabric are sewn together as tightly as possible. You can see how smoothly the bands ended up, which made attaching the cover to the frame much easier and made a really nice finished product.

douglee25 01-25-2010 12:04 PM

Good stuff Dan. When I sew the welt, I do it in two steps because I'm not as skilled as yourself at this point. I like the finished look of the smaller welt. I may go down that route on the next project if I need welting.

Doug

cboy 01-25-2010 03:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes
... but it would not be advisable for a beginning sewer to try to sew two panels with a loose welt in between together all at one time ...

I must apologize if my post was not clear enough and could be interpreted this way. I did not sew my panels together with a "loose welt" in between nor was it my intent to suggest that it could or should be done that way. I secured my welting to one panel just as Dan secures the welting to one panel. I chose to use staples, he uses thread. But I would agree 100% that too much can go wrong if a beginner were to try to do it with loose welt.


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