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  #211 (permalink)  
Old 02-04-2011, 02:32 PM
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The kit I have says 400 at 20 minutes. I have not actually used it yet. I believe that is typical but that is about as much as I know about it.

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  #212 (permalink)  
Old 02-04-2011, 03:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pepi
Not a home made tool but a modified one. I see post from time to time asking about turning a wood band saw into a metal saw . Here is a couple of shots of the reduction it takes to make that happen . Just an fyi
I'm also in the process of turning a woodworking bandsaw into a metalworking one, except I was able to snag an unused 40:1 speed reducer cheap off of Ebay that perfectly fits the original motor, and then picked up a couple different sized pulleys from Tractor Supply to fine-tune the blade speed. I haven't finished it yet so don't know how well it'll work, but there's another option.

For another home made tool that worked that I built, I turned a wood lathe into a crude but functional metal lathe. My grandfather had an old cross slide that I inherited, so I welded up an adapter plate that would attach to the slide using t-nuts, and had slots that would work for the standard lathe mounts. Also thanks to Ebay, I got a single-bit tool holder, and a thick piece of aluminum to use as a spacer. Minimum speed on this lathe is approx. 500 RPM, so probably a bit fast for the work that I needed to do, but I got it done regardless.

Reason I did this was I am in the process of upgrading the brakes on my '78 T/A to use calipers and rotors off of a '00 T/A. One of the obstacles is the '00 rotors are slip-on, so I had to turn down a set of old '78 rotors to make a pair of dedicated hubs. Actually, these rotors are off of a 1LE 3rd gen, so I also upgraded to larger wheel bearings at the same time.

Pic #1 shows the cross-slide and adapter plate on the lathe bed.
Pic #2 shows everything mocked up and in position.
Pic #3 shows one of the hubs turned down to the correct diameter. Keen eyes will also notice the chunks of aluminum wedged under the adapter plate to give it some much needed support - was awful flexy before this.

It's not gonna be doing any super-precision metalwork, but I didn't need it for that. Once I found the right tooling (1/4" carbide inserts and holders from HF to handle the cast iron rotors) it worked surprisingly well.
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  #213 (permalink)  
Old 02-04-2011, 06:19 PM
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I keep tons of cheap throw away tools on hands with no warranty.I have a few distribitor wrenches made from cheap throw away wrenches welded to rod stock including threaded rod.They work and I save money.I have done this to the cheap screwdrivers too,bend including grinding on them.
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  #214 (permalink)  
Old 02-05-2011, 09:02 PM
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[QUOTE=Duntov]
Quote:
Originally Posted by gow589
Built circuit to control/automate a kiln. Uses, powdercoating, heat treating metals. Good up to a little over 2000 degrees. I set climb rate, max temp, holding time. I can add anything with programing if I need:


I like it............. I'm behind the curve on powder coating.. Could you tell me what kinds of Temps are required to powder coat? My neighbor set up an oven with a 48" x 48" stainless box and insulated it with oven foil and layers of duct liner glass.. But he used elements, thermostat and controls from a 220 range/oven. So I'm thinking he's running at 500f or less. Does that do it, or are there various powder coatings with differing specs?

I ask thinking maybe I'm not the only one who doesn't know.. Hopefully
It depends somewhat on the powder. Some cure lower, some cure higher but most of them are in the range of 375 - 400 degrees, The important part is that it is PART METAL TEMPERATURE not oven temp. So you start timing your cure time when the part hits 400 not when you put it in the oven. For large heavy parts like wheels, intakes, it can take up to 45 minutes for the part to hit the right PMT so you're looking at potentially an hour at 400 degrees for a cure.

Here's some of my work

Coal bucket in Green Vein



Valve covers for a friend. Blasted Aluminum powder over mirror yellow



Edlebrock Intake and fuel rails off the same car.

Clear on the intake, Mirror yellow on the rails



LS Truck Manifolds in Cast Iron Ceramic



DSM Manifold, Satin Black and Red Wagon



My Own Intake and fuel rails. Everything here is powdered

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  #215 (permalink)  
Old 02-06-2011, 04:58 AM
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you definitely have a captive market with this quality of finish. How professional.
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  #216 (permalink)  
Old 02-06-2011, 03:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duntov
... But he used elements, thermostat and controls from a 220 range/oven. So I'm thinking he's running at 500f or less. Does that do it...
A conventional electric range should be plenty good for most hobby powdercoating. I never run mine over 450* and as mentioned above, most things are done in the 400-425* range. And aminga is spot on regarding PART temperature, not oven temperature. Makes an infrared thermometer almost mandatory for determining the part temp. and the timing for the entire process. After a while, you can pretty well determine the time sequence based on flow-out of the powder. But early on use your thermometer.
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  #217 (permalink)  
Old 02-16-2011, 08:22 PM
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I just, err, 'reverse engineered' a fender roller!



Yup, I even home powder coated that beaut.
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  #218 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2011, 05:51 AM
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nice work Johnny K,I'll bet that comes in handy...is that a roller skate wheel ?
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  #219 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2011, 07:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cboy
A conventional electric range should be plenty good for most hobby powdercoating. I never run mine over 450* and as mentioned above, most things are done in the 400-425* range. And aminga is spot on regarding PART temperature, not oven temperature. Makes an infrared thermometer almost mandatory for determining the part temp. and the timing for the entire process. After a while, you can pretty well determine the time sequence based on flow-out of the powder. But early on use your thermometer.

After a hard lesson on my new and improved T-type wheel project. I always use the IR thermometer. First time I did this I had an hour of blasting and 3-4 hours of polishing in each wheel. THe cure was 20 minutes after flowout. The first time it got cold the powder cracked and came off the polished parts.

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  #220 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2011, 08:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aminga
After a hard lesson on my new and improved T-type wheel project. I always use the IR thermometer. First time I did this I had an hour of blasting and 3-4 hours of polishing in each wheel. THe cure was 20 minutes after flowout. The first time it got cold the powder cracked and came off the polished parts.
since I can got o 2000+ and hold temps I have actually been looking at some high temp coatings. I have some webers I may use some high temp coatings on.
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  #221 (permalink)  
Old 02-18-2011, 07:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gow589
since I can got o 2000+ and hold temps I have actually been looking at some high temp coatings. I have some webers I may use some high temp coatings on.
Not to get too far off topic but I've been using some of the newer Air dry ceramics. No curing. Just spray it on with an airbrush and let it dry. You have to be a little careful on first start/run with the temps but it's easy as pie
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  #222 (permalink)  
Old 02-18-2011, 07:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aminga
Not to get too far off topic but I've been using some of the newer Air dry ceramics. No curing. Just spray it on with an airbrush and let it dry. You have to be a little careful on first start/run with the temps but it's easy as pie
Do they cure as the part heats up during operation?
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  #223 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2011, 05:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gow589
Do they cure as the part heats up during operation?
Yes. You just can't go nuts with the EGT's before it cures. Idle it for 30 minute and it will be fine.

Here's a set of ford longtubes in Satin black

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  #224 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2011, 12:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyK81
I just, err, 'reverse engineered' a fender roller!



Yup, I even home powder coated that beaut.
Congrats, that looks like a class act.
Can you post details & dimensions for us DIY's that can't afford to buy one, please?

Thanks.
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Old 02-22-2011, 10:43 PM
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I build my abrasive blasting cabinet and it worked out pretty damn well. You can see the build on my blog at www.smecca.com
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