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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2009, 07:12 PM
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home made tools that worked

I just thought it would be cool to hear of peoples home made tools that worked to do the job, or even better if it worked better than the actual tool did.
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2009, 07:47 PM
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Here are 2 that I made, the first is a "hole saw" for nylon carpet made from a 2" piece of 5/8" SS tubing with a washer welded to the end and a long bolt (cut off head and grind to a point) nutted tthrough the washer. I heat it up with a propane torch and use it to drill holes in carpet for seats, consoles, etc. Use the "point" to locate the saw through the carpet (into the bolt hole).

The second is a pressurized brake bleeder that uses ~ 30# of air pressure to force brake fluid through the lines, making brake bleeding a one man job. Use a large "C" clamp to hold 'er down.

Russ
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  #3 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2009, 08:20 PM
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I'v got a preassurized engine lubricator.. built with plumbing parts and threads into a 3/8" oil galley plug
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Old 09-11-2009, 07:13 AM
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Russ,

Great brake bleeder and carpet "saw". I'm stealing them both.
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Old 09-11-2009, 07:43 AM
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Very inventive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by S10xGN
Here are 2 that I made, the first is a "hole saw" for nylon carpet made from a 2" piece of 5/8" SS tubing with a washer welded to the end and a long bolt (cut off head and grind to a point) nutted tthrough the washer. I heat it up with a propane torch and use it to drill holes in carpet for seats, consoles, etc. Use the "point" to locate the saw through the carpet (into the bolt hole).

The second is a pressurized brake bleeder that uses ~ 30# of air pressure to force brake fluid through the lines, making brake bleeding a one man job. Use a large "C" clamp to hold 'er down.

Russ
Top job. By tomorrow they will be made in China. I will give you a top score on the one man brake bleeder.
Cheers
Al.
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Old 09-11-2009, 07:59 AM
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Spot painter - for very precise BC or CC coverage.

I needed to do a very small repair to my BC/CC paint job and wanted to limit the fan size but also wanted the atomization to be about the same as the original shoot. The solution...a shroud. I cut the bottom out of a plastic 35mm film canister and mounted it to the gun tip of my detail gun. Note - the gun tip had to be wound with a few turns of black electrical tape to get the canister to fit snug. It worked well...but you won't want to paint too long with it since the paint will collect in the shroud and eventually drip out the open end. It did the trick for my purposes and the cost was $.00



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Old 09-11-2009, 08:10 AM
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Credit card filler applicator for pin-holes.

Due to some poor bondo mixing on my part, some pin holes were visible when I applied my 2K primer. I tried filling the holes but every applicator I used simply pulled the filler or primer right back out of the holes.

The solution, I used an old credit card (photo 1), cut off a small strip and shaped the end (photo 2) and then used it to press thick 2K primer into the pin holes. Worked very well but use the flat part of the credit card not the sharp edge (per picture 3). Cost $.00





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Old 09-11-2009, 08:18 AM
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Light stands from speaker stands and shop lights.

I needed more movable lighting for shooting my paint. The solution...some old speaker stands from a home theater setup (photo 1). A pair of inexpensive 4' shot lights bolted to a bracket (photo 2). And some pretty nifty movable lighting (photo 3). I made a pair of these lights and used them extensively during the paint shoot. Cost...$20 for the shop lights.





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Old 09-11-2009, 08:23 AM
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Sanding in tight corners.

On almost any car there will be some very tight corners that need sanding when doing your paint prep. I made this little tool for getting into those corners. It's a length of 1/8 x 1" steel, bent slightly, handle wrapped in closed cell upholstery foam, and a piece of stick-on sandpaper attached to the business end (photo 1). Photo 2 shows the tool's use in a tight corner of my pickup bed.



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Old 09-11-2009, 08:29 AM
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Jitterbug speed controller.

This is more of a tool "modification" than a tool fabrication. I needed to control the speed on my jitterbug sander when working in tight quarters or near edges and curves. This little bolt through the paddle switch arm did the trick.



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Old 09-11-2009, 08:39 AM
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Cutting and buffing in tight quarters.

Typical buffing wheels (3" to 7") are great for the big flat parts of your car, but what about all the little nooks, crannies, and tight spots? Where's what I came up with for buffing out all the bracketry on my chassis. I used an old foam wheel that had lost it's velcro mounting pad. I cut it up into various sizes and shapes and then used various dremel type pads and wheels and either hot glued the foam to the mount or used velcro to hold the foam in place. The last picture shows a typical area of the chassis where I used these mini-buffing/polishing pads.





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Old 09-11-2009, 08:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 67Mustang Al.
Top job. By tomorrow they will be made in China. I will give you a top score on the one man brake bleeder.
Cheers
Al.

That goes for all these tools.

I'd rather make it than buy it !!


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Old 09-11-2009, 08:56 AM
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Remote pot paint gun...for shooting upside down and in tight quarters.

This is another "tool modification". My HVLP gun would not work for painting under the visor or in some of the other tight spots on my sedan delivery. So I took apart an old detail siphon gun and made this "remote pot" gun. Full details of the conversion are here.

Here's a shot of the finished product and a shot of how it was used. the arrows show where the gun and pot were originally attached to one another. Worked well but the pot needed to be located above the gun head so it would feed properly. I used it for shooting primer, BC and CC.



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Old 09-11-2009, 09:14 AM
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Square tube bending die for Harbor Freight pipe bender.

When I fabricate my bodies I have to bend a LOT of 1x1 square tubing. To do this I use my $89 H.F. pipe bender along with a die I constructed for bending the tubing. Step by step construction of the die can be found here. Below is a shot of the die in the H.F. pipe bender and a shot of a 90 degree bend made using the die. This same die construction technique could be used for other tubing shapes and sizes.



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Old 09-11-2009, 09:33 AM
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Sheet metal curve bending tool.

This may belong more in a thread about "technique" rather than "tools" but it is a very crude tool.

To make uniform curved bends in sheet metal I use a length of PVC pipe (diameter varies depending on the curve I want to make). The pipe is clamped to a table and the flat sheet metal piece is clamped down it's center line to the top of the pipe (as shown in the first photo). Then you hand bend it around the pipe as far as you can followed by hammering with a plastic headed mallet (or small steel headed mall) until it conforms to the curve of the PVC pipe.

Then you reverse the process, hammering from the inside of the sheet metal while using a length of steel well casing as your "form", as shown in the second photo.

The last photo shows this length of curved sheet metal attached in place about the door. Further details of using this tool are shown here.





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