Soft Bayonet type shocks for Model T - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Suspension - Brakes - Steering
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 04-13-2007, 08:13 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Mar Vista
Posts: 12
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Soft Bayonet type shocks for Model T

I have a model t hot rod that is a bear to drive on some freeways. The shocks are bayonet style (like 1st gen mustang). Because the car weighs nothing...the bumps are quite hard. Anyone cure this prob? If so, what mfr, p/n ?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 04-14-2007, 12:48 AM
home brew's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Body and exterior tips Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Pense, Sk, Canada
Age: 68
Posts: 7,050
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What spring setup are you using? If it is a semi elliptical cross spring how many leaves do you have in the pack? Do you shocks bottom out when you hit bumps? At rest do the shocks sit about half way between their travel?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 04-14-2007, 02:45 AM
Member
 
Last wiki edit: Vacuum brake bleeder set up
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,245
Wiki Edits: 8

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Take the shocks off and do some more driving around. You might find that it is still just as stiff which would mean your problem is the springs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 04-16-2007, 11:17 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Mar Vista
Posts: 12
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Interim solution

Here is a history of my exploits:

Found street driving harsh and freeway driving with bad expansion plates was so bad it caused the car to self destruct.

Went to the junkyard looking for smallest possible wire coil ... had to pull them off a late model econo car (actually separating them from a coil over assembly). Nothing smaller.

Tried new non-adjustable shocks in case old ones were somehow stiff because of a clogged valve.

The stiffness eased up but only about 10-15%. Clearly the shocks were the problem. I needed shocks to have soft rebound control and 0 effect in compression...to benefit from the small springs.

I tried driving without shocks. The oscillation was spooky on 45 mph surface streets, and really wild on the freeway. I loaded the trunk with about 80 pounds of weight, but oscillation still required a slow, dangerous freeway drive. If you want a "Mr Toads Wild Ride" without long lines of disneyland, this is the way to go; pay up the life insurance.

I looked in a summit catalog for adjustable bayonet shocks. I happened to have some expensive Koni adjustable bayonets. I didnt want to resort to it (the were installed on an expensive race car setup), but I put it on Sunday. They are not 2 way adjustable, nor are they externally adjustable. Before installation I set them to the absolute softest level...so soft they are held up by the coil springs. Subsequently, the surface street driving is pretty darn nice...but freeway driving is still a bear. I'm also thinking that this ride is partly to blame but a high ratio of unsprung to sprung weight. The unsprung weight is probably equivalent to a 1970 Ford Maverick, yet the sprung weight of this model t is probably 1/2 of a Maverick's sprung weight.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 04-16-2007, 11:23 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: The Lone Star State (Houston area)
Posts: 1,189
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Any T roadster can be made to ride quite well if suspension components are correctly chosen and installed.
Most Ts are built with springing that is too stiff which makes a hellish ride and even with shocks(how can a shock work if the spring is not functioning?) doesn't work that well.
Plus, most T roadsters have seats which aren't really seats but poorly performing foam blocks with pretty upholstery. A stock T seat spring works wonders in the comfort department.

First, walk up the car, put your foot on the front perch and push down. If the car doesn't react unless you stand up on the perch then you have a suspension problem. You should be able to push down and have the car bounce once or twice and come to rest. This applies front AND rear just like any other car.
Are your shocks mounted so that they have working room? Often, folks mount shocks with not enough travel room and they bottom out giving you that jarring bump.
If your car has coil-overs, rear or all around, and they are not moving much, try a lighter set of springs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 04-16-2007, 01:50 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Mar Vista
Posts: 12
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
prev questions

to answer previous questions, there is no issue of bottoming out. i think coil and shock travel looks normal. front is traverse leaf, rear is coil. honestly, the coil came from a macpherson strut...the smallest you could find.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 05-02-2007, 07:37 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Mar Vista
Posts: 12
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by home brew
What spring setup are you using? If it is a semi elliptical cross spring how many leaves do you have in the pack? Do you shocks bottom out when you hit bumps? At rest do the shocks sit about half way between their travel?
instead of just eyeballing it, i measured it, and did the math, and inadequate shock travel is a major cause... prob is, it already 14" coils and finding 16" x 4.25 OD coils is not easy...

well, thanks for the tip
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 05-02-2007, 10:16 PM
home brew's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Body and exterior tips Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Pense, Sk, Canada
Age: 68
Posts: 7,050
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
How many leaves in the front spring?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2007, 08:05 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: The Lone Star State (Houston area)
Posts: 1,189
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
So your rear shocks are bottoming out. You should be able to modify the shock bracketry to allow for more travel without killing the car for too long.
If the shock is installed inside the coil spring, either extend the upper mount or drop the lower mount to allow for correct travel (I did this to my Old Roadster and the ride became excellent from horrid). If the shock is outside the coil spring mounted at an angle (30-45 degrees), the easiest way to change this is to move the lower bracket inward and down to allow the shock more travel at a less steep angle. It may even be possible to make a temporary bolt-on bracket(bolts to the old bracket) to make this shift possible and allow for repair and restoraion during the non-driving season.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2007, 08:20 AM
Dugg's Avatar
My compass doesn't point North
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: in the hills of Colorado
Posts: 148
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
......... a couple of real amateur questions here ... hey, there's stuff I do know about, so keep the snickering to a low roar.

What is a "bayonet type" shock I've seen; tubular, lever hydraulic and lever friction, but I'm not familiar with the term bayonet.

As long as you're in a good mood now, a second question. What is the meaning of the Barnstar next to so many members names? And, are these rusty cast iron looking stars available for purchase? I think they're neat and I could see making candle holders out of them for art fairs. Sure, now even I can hear you laughing from here.

I've done some stainless steel furniture and a couple of artsy gates and I think the stars could become a trademark for some of my junk.... ooops, I mean art.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2007, 01:05 PM
home brew's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Body and exterior tips Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Pense, Sk, Canada
Age: 68
Posts: 7,050
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
A "bayonet type" shock is a tubular shock.

Barnstars are given to those contributing to the Crankshaft Coalition Wiki (link at the top of the page).

They were originally used on barns as decoration and would be much to big to be used as candle holders. Why not make up a mold and cast them yourself or you could make them out of clay and glaze and fire them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 05-04-2007, 07:57 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Mar Vista
Posts: 12
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dugg
......... a couple of real amateur questions here ... hey, there's stuff I do know about, so keep the snickering to a low roar.

What is a "bayonet type" shock I've seen; tubular, lever hydraulic and lever friction, but I'm not familiar with the term bayonet.

As long as you're in a good mood now, a second question. What is the meaning of the Barnstar next to so many members names? And, are these rusty cast iron looking stars available for purchase? I think they're neat and I could see making candle holders out of them for art fairs. Sure, now even I can hear you laughing from here.

I've done some stainless steel furniture and a couple of artsy gates and I think the stars could become a trademark for some of my junk.... ooops, I mean art.
imagine pulling shock absorber and trying to stab a part store clerk. if he survives because it has a "eye" at the top for horizontal bolts or a "T" for two bolts, then its not bayonet...if he dies because it has a threaded stud on each end, then its a bayonet style.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 05-04-2007, 07:58 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Mar Vista
Posts: 12
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by pasadenahotrod
So your rear shocks are bottoming out. You should be able to modify the shock bracketry to allow for more travel without killing the car for too long.
If the shock is installed inside the coil spring, either extend the upper mount or drop the lower mount to allow for correct travel (I did this to my Old Roadster and the ride became excellent from horrid). If the shock is outside the coil spring mounted at an angle (30-45 degrees), the easiest way to change this is to move the lower bracket inward and down to allow the shock more travel at a less steep angle. It may even be possible to make a temporary bolt-on bracket(bolts to the old bracket) to make this shift possible and allow for repair and restoraion during the non-driving season.
it is concentric with the coil...i'll have to arrange alternative, taller mounting space...thanks for the ideas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Suspension - Brakes - Steering posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rear Drag Shocks on a Street Car? JohnTN Suspension - Brakes - Steering 2 08-09-2005 04:25 PM
What Front Shocks for a Softer Ride? Doc68 Suspension - Brakes - Steering 3 12-03-2003 07:39 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:19 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.