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-   -   Is "Spot & Glaze" putty good for anything anymore? (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/spot-glaze-putty-good-anything-anymore-74865.html)

FrankR 11-27-2005 01:14 PM

Is "Spot & Glaze" putty good for anything anymore?
 
I found a tube of Bondo "Spot & Glaze" putty that is still usable, but I seem to remember reading people saying to not use it. Problems with it shrinking and cracking? I believe this is laquer based primer in a thick form, isn't it?

Is it of any use or should I toss it?

LanceM 11-27-2005 01:41 PM

Toss it, no use for it in the 2K world of paint.

MARTINSR 11-27-2005 01:45 PM

You could use it for filling nail holes in the trim on your house. But then again, I use 2K for that!

Brian

poncho62 11-27-2005 01:54 PM

I use it as putty when building model cars.........................thats about it.

oldred 11-27-2005 04:10 PM

I used it under acrylic enamel and with lacquer primer some years ago(didn't know any better :rolleyes: ) and within a year every single spot could be picked out at 25 feet. That stuff don't just shrink it literally disappears!

302 Z28 11-27-2005 05:03 PM

Chunk it, I tried to use some I had left over and it sanded at a different rate than 2K primer.

Vince

crashtech 11-27-2005 05:26 PM

Here I am, the heretic as usual. The main problem with that kind of material is that it is basically very thick lacquer primer, with all of the shortcomings inherent with lacquer, mainly that it shrinks and will absorb solvent from the topcoat, swell, then shrink again. This stuff does have one nice thing going for it, and that is it sands beautifully, like butter. I have found one use for this stuff, and I have not seen too many people use it this way. When you have finished off an area of plastic filler, there are normally quite a few pinholes, some large, some small. Filling all the visible pinholes with polyester putty can still leave "constellations" of tiny invisible pinholes that will suddenly become visible after the first coat of primer. So after the polyester putty and before primer, a tech can scrape an extremely thin layer of lacquer putty over the entire filled surface, go away and do something else for a couple hours, then block the whole thing with some 180 until the only putty left is in the micro-pinholes, and prime. Guess what? I've never had a shrinkage problem with this technique, due to a variety of factors, one of which is the filler tends to "wick away" the solvents and won't allow the putty to stay swelled up. Now, I'm not saying that anyone ought to use lacquer putty, just that it can be made to work with conscientious procedures and and awareness of its shortcomings...

tab 11-27-2005 07:59 PM

bondo body putty
 
I have used this stuff lots of times with excellent results. It's especially good for going over areas with bondo, when you need to get an area perfect. I also use it to fill small door dings. It does not shrink.

You can get best results by applying the putty, sanding, then applying some primer, sanding, applying a bit more putty, and so on. This layering effect works great and lasts. I used it extensively on the vehicles below.
http://www.digiflux.biz/truck_web.jpg

http://www.digiflux.biz/del-sol-paint.jpg

MARTINSR 11-27-2005 08:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crashtech
Here I am, the heretic as usual.

Jimminie Crickets crashtech, I had to go to my big dictionary for that one. :)

You havn't proven to be so unorthodox to me in the past, this one sure is. Here is one or you, archaic, how about antiquated? But I think the most accurate description would be, obsolete. :spank:

Holy crap, I havn't done that since 1978! No kidding, I have not seen that procedure since my first full time job doing used cars for Cliffs autobody. A shop that was built out of an old barn with a gravel floor. In the winter we would have to park the cars all over the place at different angles to avoid the water dripping on them from the leaking roof.

No, everyone else is right, there is NO PLACE FOR THAT JUNK in autobody repair in the 21st Century.

If you have pin holes AFTER polyester putty you are doing something seriously wrong. You have to WANT to get pin holes in that stuff.

OK NEWBES, just to be sure, a believer in Scientology will DIE because he doesn't believe in antibiotics, that doesn't mean the SCIENCE doesn't exist to prove them wrong. :nono:

I am sorry Crashtech, there is NO REASON TO HAVE THAT JUNK IN THE SHOP. :spank:

Nothing personal. :thumbup:

Tab, layering putty, primer, putty, primer goes against EVERYTHING we know about these products. If you don't have shrinkage you are magical, a walking talking magician.

"Perfect scenario" top 100
1. Metal finish, 2k prime, block,sand, paint.
2. Metal finish, 2K prime, block, 2K prime, sand, paint.
3. Metal finish, 2K prime, block,2K prime, block, sand paint.
4. Near metal finish, skim coat polyester putty, 2K prime, block,sand , paint.
5. Nice metal straightening, plastic filler, polyester putty, 2K prime, block, sand, paint.
.........................
..........
............
38. Decent job metal repair, plastic filler, lacquer spot putty, prime, lacquer spot putty, prime, ........
.......
......
100. Bang it with a rock and spread spackle on it then without sanding spray trunk spatter paint on it.

Nothing personal, we are chatting out in a neighborhood garage. Please, nothing personal. :welcome:

Brian

kenseth17 11-27-2005 09:43 PM

Pinholes in your putty. Lot has to do with how you mix it. Now some puttys seem more prone to getting them with, but if you induce air into it when you mix it, then you get pinholes. The metal 2 metal we use to use was bad for them, but once I changed the way I mixed, there was an improvement. If you just stir it to mix, you are getting air in the mixture. It should be mixed, hard to explain, by folding it over and pressing down. Not saying crash tech as mixing wrong by any means, I can tell he knows what he is doing, just a pointer that may help someone. I believe I have a tube of 3m green spot putty packed away somewhere, really old. Anyone is welcome to have it if it is still usable if I find it. I'll never use the stuff. So many of the 2 part finishing puttys sand so easily that no reason really to use the spot putty.

crashtech 11-27-2005 09:51 PM

I don't usually quote myself, but:
Quote:

Originally Posted by crashtech
Now, I'm not saying that anyone ought to use lacquer putty

What I am saying is I pesonally can use it on a repair, and would defy anyone to tell me whether I had used it, and where the defects are. But anyway, what I need to do here is play to the crowd, so folks, don't try this at home, it is at MARTINSR says, an antiquated product that will 99% of the time cause you nothing but grief!!! (Is that better? ;) )

MARTINSR 11-27-2005 09:55 PM

LOLOLOLOL, Crashtech, if we were in that garage in the neighborhood now is about the time I walk over to the fridge and grab you one of my GOOD beers. :thumbup:

Brian

MARTINSR 11-27-2005 10:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kenseth17
Pinholes in your putty. Lot has to do with how you mix it. Now some puttys seem more prone to getting them with, but if you induce air into it when you mix it, then you get pinholes. The metal 2 metal we use to use was bad for them, but once I changed the way I mixed, there was an improvement. If you just stir it to mix, you are getting air in the mixture. It should be mixed, hard to explain, by folding it over and pressing down. Not saying crash tech as mixing wrong by any means, I can tell he knows what he is doing, just a pointer that may help someone. I believe I have a tube of 3m green spot putty packed away somewhere, really old. Anyone is welcome to have it if it is still usable if I find it. I'll never use the stuff. So many of the 2 part finishing puttys sand so easily that no reason really to use the spot putty.

If you ask it to do too much, fill too much, that too is a reason you could get pin holes. Evercoats Metal Glaze and Glaze Coat are pretty hard to pin hole UNLESS you try to make it do too much.

It should be PRESSED into the panel on the first pass and then on the second to make a little build, spread it, but ADD some pressure. The final product should be VERY thin, a 1/16" MAX before sanding. The only time I see pin holes is the "squirtout" at the edge of the spreader over the edge of the end of a panel or something like that. Where it is WAY too thick you will get pin holes, but not where you keep it thin with pressure.

You laid out the mixing well, fold it and press down squishing it out. I use two tools, cleaning it off one with the other, back and forth spreading it on the mixing board with pressure just like on the panel where it will be applied.

Brian

kenseth17 11-27-2005 10:22 PM

I do much of it the same way.

Quote:

Where it is WAY too thick you will get pin holes
You didn't work where I used the metal 2 metal. It was on fabricated pieces that couldn't really pull or pound out, thick aluminum with no access inside as well as an aluminum frame inside. Some of it needed a bit of fill, and had to be done quickly as possible. :P

crashtech 11-27-2005 10:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MARTINSR
LOLOLOLOL, Crashtech, if we were in that garage in the neighborhood now is about the time I walk over to the fridge and grab you one of my GOOD beers. :thumbup:

Brian

Mmmmmmm, beer! Cheers! :D

Hey, FrankR, I thought of a use for that stuff. If you live where you can burn stuff, just sqeeze it around in the burn barrel and it will help light the fire! :evil:


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