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Old 12-15-2002, 05:13 AM
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Post stall torque converter

Does anyone know what is stock stall in a th350? Also, would like to hear pros and cons regarding use of a stall converter in a mild street rod. (305/ mild cam/performer intake/600 cfm carb/headers/4:11.

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Old 12-15-2002, 05:50 AM
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1600 RPM is the figure I have been quoted. Easy enough to find out by calling Parts house and asking for the specs on the OEM converter. Think of higher stall speed as longer "dead time" between Idle and transmission engagement. Increasing the stall speed in your torque converter lets your engine get higher on the torque and rpm curve before engaging. High stall speeds for a draging vehicle is good. For a driver, it would get old fast due to highly irritable hesitations and the increased gas milage.(assuming you go up more than a few hundred RPM) I have gone to lower RPM stall because I have a very high torque motor in a 2600 # vehicle. This keeps me from totally melting the tires and the vehicle starts moving immediately with no wasted RPMs. Don't think a "mild" 305 would fall in this class. Since most GM torque converters usually come in 200 RPM cange increments, you could go to an 1800RPM stall speed, but only if you had the tranny out. Even then, you probably would not "feel" the difference, but may get a slight improvement in ETs/track times.

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Old 12-15-2002, 06:06 AM
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Youshould never use any more stall speed than you need. That 'dead time' trees refered to is slippage. Slippage causes heat and unnecessary fluid wear. Also if you go to a high stall converter with a stock rear end it will force your engine to run below the converters stall speed causing slippage and heat buildup the whole time you're driving. I always suggest a trans cooler and trans temp gauge.
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Old 12-15-2002, 06:23 AM
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Here is a link from an old post on converters, it is one of many if you searched through the archives. <a href="http://www.hotrodders.com/cgibin/ubb/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=16&t=000219" target="_blank">LINK</a> There is a lot of info out there. "Stall speed is directly related to the amount of torque your engine produces-the more torque, the higher the stall speed. For example, a converter with a 2,800 to 3,200rpm rating might provide approximately 2,800rpm of stall speed behind a mild small block V8, but about 5,000rpm behind a big block making 800-plus ft-lbs. of torque. While most converter manufactures list stall speed ranges, those numbers are very, very general guidelines; true stall speed is impossible to measure do to vehicle variables. Heat is the biggest enemy of your converter and transmission. Stepping up to a higher stall converter can impose higher loads and create more heat, so proper cooling is essential." This is right out of a book on torque converter info. Hope this info helps, there's a lot more to picking a converter than just what engine you have.
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Old 12-15-2002, 07:13 AM
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Vehicle weight is also a factor of what RPM the converter engages at. I bought a 1800-2200 TCI Saturday Night Special and can NOT tell much difference from the stock converter. When I selected it, I was unfamiliar with torque converters and automatics (All my previous Hot Rods were straight shift) and was concerned about the slippage and heat build up that everyone mentions when talking about higher than stock stall converters. I wanted quicker take off from a stop. I will be going to a 2600-2800 stall soon. This is what was suggested from both COAN and HUGHES converters for what I want. Give them a call and tell them ALL the info about your vehicle and what type of driving and performance you are looking for. My '28 Ford Closed Cab Pickup weighs 2660 pounds. It has a 350 Chevy with AFR 190cc heads,Comp Cam 280H .480/.480, Edelbrock RPM Air Gap, Holley 770cfm Street Avenger,Blockhugger headers, 350 trans and 3.80 rear gears with 28" ProTrac rear tires. I also run the transmission lines from the trans to the radiator, then to a trans cooler and back to the trans. Transmission fluid should run in the 170 degree range for best service.
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Old 12-15-2002, 07:29 AM
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I wouldn't think you would feel too much of a difference only going about 200-400rpm above stock. What I don't understand is guys that think there car is slow and figure a 3,800 stall converter will make it a race car. The purpose of the higher stall speed is to allow a radical engine to stay in gear without loading up and for race applications to launch at a higher rpm. Just my opinion but I have never felt the need to use a really high stall converter in any of my street cars. But then again I set my engines up to run that way. Again I stress, this is just opinion.
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Old 12-15-2002, 09:13 AM
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dmorris, It's my guess that your opinion is appreciated and respected. It's always nice when a person comes to the board with a problem and receives input like yours. Not like the clown who responded to my torque converter question last month. His answer was far from helpful and totally sarchastic. He presented it like I was a jerk for building my car my way and advised me to dismantle my engine and start over. Let me think on that. Let's see--car just finished, forty grand invested--yeah right!! Keep up the good work dm. Opinions like yours are always welcome. Thanks.

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Old 12-15-2002, 09:36 AM
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The bottom line is when selecting camshafts or converters.....consult the manufacturer (of your choice) and have them select the proper one.

They want you to be HAPPY so they will get more business from your friends. They are professionals and will make a better selection than your guess or what you will hear on this forum. :p

There is no test of knowledge to post on this board and so there is a lot of stupid answers to ignorant questions. On the flip side there are some very smart and knowledgeable folks who post here. You just have to decide which is on the up and up and those who don't have a clue .
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Old 12-15-2002, 09:58 AM
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What Dm said!
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Old 12-15-2002, 10:06 AM
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Yo, thanks fo the props yo! You know you all's my peeps!
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Old 12-26-2002, 10:05 PM
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I have a 1969 corvette that has a 350/300 h.p. engine and has a 400 thm trans.--The spec. in the owners manual show 2100 stall.--Chevy made 4 different engines that year.--The 350/300 h.p. shows a red line of 5300 rpm.
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Old 12-28-2002, 04:34 PM
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I have 2 camaro's with 305's, one with stock carb and 1600 stall convertor, the other a mild modified TPI motor with a 2000 stall convertor. With your 4:11's you will be cruising above 2500 rpm most of the time, so I would think a 2000 stall convertor in combo with your 4:11's would give peppy off the line performance and still not be slipping ( heat ) too much at cruise.
Rob
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