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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 04-17-2008, 04:08 PM
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if it's deffinetly a Ford engine, there will be no need for an oil pump primer, as Ford just used a 5/16" hex shaft for the pump drive... so you just need a 1/4" drive 5/16" socket chucked w/ an adaptor into a drill..

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 04-17-2008, 04:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curtis73
WAIT!!!!!

Now that I got your attention Definitely pull the distributor, buy an oil priming tool ($15) and spin the oil pump for a few minutes with a drill. Over the years, all the oil has drained out of critical places and you need to get oil in there before you hit it with the starter.

Also, pull the valve covers and using an oil can squirt oil on the cam lobes if you can. The cam lobes rely on oil slung from the crankshaft. They get little or no oil from anywhere else. They are a heavy friction area and running it before you get oil on those lobes can wipe them flat in one revolution. In normal operation when the car only sits for a few days or weeks at a time, enough oil remains on the lobes to be fine for the next startup, but when it sits that long you have direct metal to metal with no oil on the lobes.

Cam lobes for flat tappet cams are much like an egg hard on the outside, soft on the inside. They are made of relatively soft cast iron and the surface of the lobes is hardened. Once you score the surface of the lobes its all over.
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"Definitely pull the distributor"( Not sure what you mean.)
You think I should replace the distributer after its been sitting this long?

What kind of oil should I apply after the valve covers are off?
Would it be a good idea to dump oil in both valve covers?

I helped with a Cam replacement on a Chevy Nova. Not fun. I'll try lube them if I can.

Thank you EVERYONE!
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 04-17-2008, 04:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matt167
if it's deffinetly a Ford engine, there will be no need for an oil pump primer, as Ford just used a 5/16" hex shaft for the pump drive... so you just need a 1/4" drive 5/16" socket chucked w/ an adapter into a drill..
Thanks matt!
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 04-17-2008, 09:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smurbs
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"Definitely pull the distributor"( Not sure what you mean.)
You think I should replace the distributer after its been sitting this long?

What kind of oil should I apply after the valve covers are off?
Would it be a good idea to dump oil in both valve covers?

I helped with a Cam replacement on a Chevy Nova. Not fun. I'll try lube them if I can.

Thank you EVERYONE!
No, the oil pump is driven off the bottom of the distributor shaft. If you take the bolt off the distributor, it lifts right out. Then you can get the socket and drill on the oil pump shaft to spin the oil pump. That will send oil through the engine without having to spin the engine. I suggest you mark the distributor and the intake with a felt pen so you can get it back in the same orientation. Make sure the rotor is pointing in the same direction. It might take a few tries; you may have to pull it back out and turn the oil pump 1/4 turn and try a few times so that the distributor shaft seats on the drive.

Just use 10w30 oil or whatever the normal oil is for the engine. Can't hurt to dump some on the rocker arms, but keep an eye on the dipstick. You don't want to go more than a quart over the maximum line.
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 04-18-2008, 02:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curtis73
No, the oil pump is driven off the bottom of the distributor shaft. If you take the bolt off the distributor, it lifts right out. Then you can get the socket and drill on the oil pump shaft to spin the oil pump. That will send oil through the engine without having to spin the engine. I suggest you mark the distributor and the intake with a felt pen so you can get it back in the same orientation. Make sure the rotor is pointing in the same direction. It might take a few tries; you may have to pull it back out and turn the oil pump 1/4 turn and try a few times so that the distributor shaft seats on the drive.

Just use 10w30 oil or whatever the normal oil is for the engine. Can't hurt to dump some on the rocker arms, but keep an eye on the dipstick. You don't want to go more than a quart over the maximum line.
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Thank you curtis! Thats awsome, I was trying to find a diagram that would tell me where the oil pump shaft was... I didn't want to ask for something I could find myself... Hard when your not exactly sure what engine your working with. . But you hotrodders got my back! You guys rock!
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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 04-18-2008, 11:26 AM
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Also, a couple of tip when using a drill and socket to spin the oil pump shaft, one, you will need an extesion to get down the distributor hole to the shaft. Two, use some duct tape to secure the sockt to the extension. If the socket falls of in the hole, its a little bit of a pain in the a** to get it out. Also, at the top of the oil pump shaft you should be able to see a little collar/washer. This collar prevents the shaft from pulling up out of the oil pump. If there isnt one, you have to be very careful not to pull the shaft out or you will have to remove the oil pan to get it back in. If there is no collar, make sure you spray some wd40 on the socket so it slides off the shaft easily when you are done.

As emtnioned above, pulling the valve covers is a good idea as well. Don't leave them off when you statrt the engine, but check the rockers after starting to confirm you are getting oil up the pushh rods to the rockers. Sometimes after sitting a while, lifter can get stuck and not pump.

Good luck
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 04-18-2008, 01:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coda618
Also, a couple of tip when using a drill and socket to spin the oil pump shaft, one, you will need an extesion to get down the distributor hole to the shaft. Two, use some duct tape to secure the sockt to the extension. If the socket falls of in the hole, its a little bit of a pain in the a** to get it out. Also, at the top of the oil pump shaft you should be able to see a little collar/washer. This collar prevents the shaft from pulling up out of the oil pump. If there isnt one, you have to be very careful not to pull the shaft out or you will have to remove the oil pan to get it back in. If there is no collar, make sure you spray some wd40 on the socket so it slides off the shaft easily when you are done.

As emtnioned above, pulling the valve covers is a good idea as well. Don't leave them off when you statrt the engine, but check the rockers after starting to confirm you are getting oil up the pushh rods to the rockers. Sometimes after sitting a while, lifter can get stuck and not pump.

Good luck
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Thanks for the tips on the oil pump shaft. Hopefully I can avoid the pain in the a** by keeping the socket on the extention.
If there is indeed no collar, should I install one later?
"but check the rockers after starting to confirm you are getting oil up the pushh rods to the rockers."

So I should get it started and right away kill it check the push rods and rockers before I cycle the engine?
How will I know that the lifter is stuck? (what can be done about this?)
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 04-18-2008, 08:20 PM
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You can let the motor run for a few minutes to get everything circulating. I don't think it is likely you will have a stuck lifter, checking it is more like extra insurance while you are at it. More of a concern if the engine has been sitting a very long time or if you don't know the maintenance history of the engine. Also, when you look under the valve covers you can get a good idea of how the engine was maintained. Is it relatively clean, or do the heads, springs etc. have a build up of sludge? Good to know what your dealing with.

If the oil pump shaft does not have a collar, just be careful. You would not be able to replace the collar, you would just have to swap the shaft which would require dropping the oil pan as well. Again, not likely, just pointing out some oddities you may come accross to be careful of.

Let us know how it all works out.
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 04-18-2008, 09:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coda618
You can let the motor run for a few minutes to get everything circulating. I don't think it is likely you will have a stuck lifter, checking it is more like extra insurance while you are at it. More of a concern if the engine has been sitting a very long time or if you don't know the maintenance history of the engine. Also, when you look under the valve covers you can get a good idea of how the engine was maintained. Is it relatively clean, or do the heads, springs etc. have a build up of sludge? Good to know what your dealing with.

If the oil pump shaft does not have a collar, just be careful. You would not be able to replace the collar, you would just have to swap the shaft which would require dropping the oil pan as well. Again, not likely, just pointing out some oddities you may come accross to be careful of.

Let us know how it all works out.
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I just went and got a oil filter and 4 quarts 15w40 shell rotella T oil.
I didn't plan to pull the valve covers till the day I plan to start.
I have a question though.
There is oil in the engine right now.
It looks really clean. I was wondering if I should turn (manualy) the oil pump w/ the clean used oil in the engine. Then give it an oil change?
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 04-18-2008, 11:15 PM
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Cheap insurance put in the new oil. Shell Rotella is also a good oil engine break-in. Either Shell or Delo will aid in cleaning out the lifters, and rocker arm pivots. They also help to rejuvenate the rear main seal and front crank seal. The zinc content is an amazing additive that you can only get in the expensive racing oils today.
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 04-19-2008, 04:12 AM
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+1 on the new oil. You prob should drain/flush out the coolant as well. Careful where you do this as antifreeze is deadly to pets, animals etc.
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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 04-19-2008, 07:54 AM
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smurb,
(just a comment not a criticism and food for thought...I made a judgement call)

I do preach: "a once of prevention is worth a pound of cure"

I did not include removing the dist in my post based on how I interpreted your questions to the previous posts....

it's a "no-brainer" to unbolt the dist and remove it and prime the motor...

you can/will damage a motor in a heartbeat if you don't put it back in correct!!!

do a gooogle search on how to remove and "re-install a dist" and how to re-time the motor till you are comfortable that you can do it correct on the first try!!!!

"scale"=rust scale due to condensation inside the gas tank
"kill the ign"=remove the wires from the coil and unplug the dist so there is no spark

repeatedly cranking a motor with no plugs so there is no compression and no load on the rotating assembly does the same thing as using a drill for pre-lube..

several lifters are likely stuck collapsed because some of the valves were held open when the motor was last turned off..... and they can't refill and pump up till you crank the motor

"hopefully", the starter can crank the rotating assembly fast enough to throw atleast a little oil onto the cylinder walls to lube the rings....
it's the dry (rusty) walls and dry piston rings that can hurt a motor most in my opinion.....there's 12,000+psi on the rings on that first cylinder firing

PIA but you can drop the oil pan and hand smear oil on the walls and squirt oil on all the rotating parts before you crank it for the first time....
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 04-19-2008, 08:24 AM
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I made a preassure luber that screws into the oil preassure port and holds about 1/2 quart.. put 20-30 PSI behind it and pump the 1/2 quart in, but careful not to pump air.. for this reason but pistion walls are still dry..
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 04-19-2008, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carsavvycook
Cheap insurance put in the new oil. Shell Rotella is also a good oil engine break-in. Either Shell or Delo will aid in cleaning out the lifters, and rocker arm pivots. They also help to rejuvenate the rear main seal and front crank seal. The zinc content is an amazing additive that you can only get in the expensive racing oils today.
I looked for the Delo oil but wal-mart doesn't carry. I'm glad I got good oil.
I didn't know so I figured you guys would tell me to get different stuff if need be. Thanks steve!
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 04-19-2008, 12:18 PM
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I did the timing on a 78 caprice. Found and marked top dead center. But we were able to use a timming light after that to see where the dist. needed to be. Without the truck running is it possable to make sure that the dist. is in the right place before i crank it? Ill go ahead and google ''re-install a dist".

"repeatedly cranking a motor with no plugs so there is no compression and no load on the rotating assembly does the same thing as using a drill for pre-lube.."
I'll go ahead and do both to be safe.(more oil everywhre the better.)

I pulled the spark plugs, they look as if they were spray painted w/ flat black paint, so I plan to replace them. What kind should I get? (old ones were autolite 2546.)

I have probably 10 times the info I had before starting this thread! It's great! Thanks hotrodders!
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