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Old 10-31-2004, 04:49 AM
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Stick frame vs. Pole Barn

For those of you that have done either...what is your preference? I am going to add on to the back of my garage next year. ALTHOUGH it's not for me it's for the wife. I'm going to put on a 24' x 24' addition with lots of glass so she can have a greenhouse. I'm hoping to squeeze enough room for a bathroom in there though. I've stick framed quite a few garages and room additions but have never done a pole barn or helped anyone that has done one. I just wonder how the price compares. Does it equal out to about the same, or is it cheaper for a pole barn. It will have to be insulated and will have some type of waterproof covering on the inside walls. TIA.

Kevin

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Old 10-31-2004, 06:38 AM
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One thought Kevin...the cost of a 2X4 frame would be more expensive than the metal frame. With all the rebuilding going on down south the wood will cost you much more. It's not really all that different to build with the metal frame...get a book...its fairly simple to use. We just had classes on using it at the Ford plant I work at for people doing home improvements. We even learned how to install our own replacement window's!! Man what a rip-off to pay someone to do that for you!!!


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Old 10-31-2004, 07:59 AM
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I think Tazz is right about stick frame being more expensive than pole frame...for the shell of the building. But when you start calculating the TOTAL cost of the building the picture can change. Depending on how finished you are going to do the inside, pole construction can raise all sorts of obstacles and expenses. Most common finish materials (things like insulation, wallboard etc.) are made modular to fit typical stick frame methods. Even things like running your electrical lines and plumbing are based on stick type construction.

Before you build pole, make sure you tour the inside of some pole buildings and think through every aspect of what you want to do INSIDE your building. What are you going to hang everything on. How are you going to attach benches or cabinets. How will you hang your drywall or inside finish material. How will you hang insulation.

I looked seriously at pole buildings when we did our garage this past spring and after some long debates determined that stick frame would work out much better for what I wanted to do. And when the TOTAL cost was calculated, it turned out about the same as pole building.

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Old 10-31-2004, 08:15 AM
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One other part to consider, though, is the cost of the glass. One of my lawn care accounts has about a 30 by 50 greenhouse attached to his house. Each peice of patio door glass (32"(?) by 76" by 3/4" cost $120+ tax. He's got probably 75 to 100 pieces of glass to make it work. Chunk of change, I tell ya. I should know. I work in a window company, and, as a bonus , I broke one of his windows this last summer. It pays to shop around for glass. I'll ask him if I can take a pic or two for you.
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Old 10-31-2004, 10:10 AM
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I agree with the extra work and cost involved in finishing out a pole building because I had one erected several years ago that is 36' wide by 27' deep with 10' walls. The support beam uprights are 9' apart so you can't simply apply 8' long sheeting for interior wall material. The 2"x6" diagonal bracing on the exterior walls diminishes the available space to later add windows or service doors without having to modify them. Because there is a clear span throughout the inside, the horizontal overhead braces are not load bearing to utilize rafter storage space. Can't use common rolled insulation as there are no 16" (or whatever) on-center joists, unless you add those too.

I needed and wanted a building and thought that a pole building would be the best bang for the buck. I haven't finished the inside of mine so I don't have cost factors to cite, but after having it built I more readily realize what's involved in finishing the interior of it.

I'd say those are minuses as far as ease of utilizing other construction elements, but I do like that a pole barn is plenty sturdy and shouldn't totally blow away in high winds (perhaps a rural consideration more than a city one). If I remember correctly, if a pole barn catches fire the beams are so thick that they don't burn through as easily as a stick-built building so it won't burn to the ground (as quickly?) or fall over as easily. The steel sheeting may be blown off but the uprights shouldn't blow over (easier and less expensive to re-skin or enclose again rather than start from scratch).

As cboy recommends, thoroughly think through everything you want to do and how much each option costs. I like my pole building but its the first structure I've ever had built and I learned the value and aspects of design considerations.

Oh yeah, mine was erected in early February in Wisconsin and it still only took about three days from bare, frozen, snow covered ground to fully enclosed. Not that that is worth a lot in the whole scope of things, but it was nice to have usable storage space so quickly.
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Old 10-31-2004, 04:08 PM
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1 other thing to consider also. If you are adding on to an existing structure, the foundations should be similar in construction (Especially depth) if you use two different foundation types there's a chance of them moving at different rates from the freeze/thaw cycle of winter. That could lead to cracked walls shifting floors, Leaky roof. When I added an addition/garage onto the house we poured the foundation the same depth as the existing foundation and drilled rebar into the old foundation to tie the 2 together.

Any ordinances against residential pole buildings in your area?
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Old 10-31-2004, 06:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by pro70z28
Any ordinances against residential pole buildings in your area?
He lives outside of the city limits....

I think that I would personally go for a stick built for the ease of finishing off the interior. I think cost would be greater on a pole building that has been finished inside compared to a stick built because you basically would have to stick build studded walls in between the poles to hang drywall, frame for windows,etc....
Later,
WEIMER
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Old 10-31-2004, 07:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Weimer


I think that I would personally go for a stick built for the ease of finishing off the interior. I think cost would be greater on a pole building that has been finished inside compared to a stick built because you basically would have to stick build studded walls in between the poles to hang drywall, frame for windows,etc....
Later,
WEIMER

..... and he would then have a foundation that would be more stable, tied to the existing structure.

Is this just a garage or is it a garage connected to a house? Just wondering how the existing structure was constructed.
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Old 10-31-2004, 11:52 PM
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My living room was a carport at first then closed in by the PO. He had built the original structure with treated 4x4s as support and the cement was poured around them. Now those are inside the wall and an open invitation for ants and other crawly vermin to come in. It is a vigilance to keep the outside of the footings sprayed with Diazanon.
But now there are more and more inexpensive homes going up that are basically just metal shop buildings that are finished off inside. It seems to be less expensive in the long run. I think the big savings might be on labor.
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Old 11-01-2004, 03:10 AM
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Quote:
Is this just a garage or is it a garage connected to a house? Just wondering how the existing structure was constructed.
It is going on an existing garage which has a block foundation. I think I am going to go with block again. I never gave a thought to to different foundations moving differently which is a good point. What I may do is bring the block higher and have shorter stick framed walls, just for the water factor (watering plants, etc) and also the lumber cost. I can get a few block layed for the price of one 2x4. The project for the winter is pricing everything up.
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Old 11-01-2004, 05:03 AM
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I always liked the idea of couple courses of blocks too. It also makes washing down the garage floor easier as you won't have water against the walls.
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Old 11-01-2004, 12:00 PM
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Finished inside: Go Stickbuilt
Unfinished storage: Pole Barn

Been there, done that.



Polebarn: Typically a 6x6, spaced 8' o.c. with 2x4 purlins mounted horizontally 2' on center. Metal clad outside.
6x6 Posts stick into interior of structure. This structure requires interior framing for finished surfaces. The material cost for erection is generally competitive with framed construction. The savings realized is generally for the exterior finishes. The 29 ga pre-finished sheetmetal is cheaper than 1/2" OSB +siding.

Last edited by Beenaway2long; 11-01-2004 at 12:03 PM.
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Old 11-04-2004, 11:52 AM
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Our existing barn was 38' x 28' with a block foundation.

Since my father had to have a couple of old Dodge pick ups one he stored in the house garage for many years, until recent. We added another 20' to the back of the barn.

The general contractor send his helpers out just the other day to finish off the interior of the new addition.

I believe the cost of doing this extra 20' was about 1/2 again what it was to build the original building which will be 20 years old next year?

One big mistake made with the new building is none of the upper space was made for storage. So now we have all that space that can't be used unless more money is put into it.
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Old 12-06-2004, 11:13 AM
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Pole Barn Or Stick build

I don't know if it matters to you or not, but some towns raise your property taxes when building or upgrading a garage, I think pole barns are not taxed (thats because some towns don't refer to pole barns as perminent structures). I could be wrong, but you might want to check it out.
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Old 12-06-2004, 11:52 AM
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Here it would be taxed. If it has a concrete floor / approach to the garage door, etc. it REALLY gets taxed.
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