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-   -   Super T-10 bearing retainer question (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/super-t-10-bearing-retainer-question-232836.html)

Silver Surfer 05-13-2013 10:54 AM

Super T-10 bearing retainer question
 
I my trans is leaking. I think it is coming from either, or both, gaskets on either side of the bearing retainer plate (one side contacts the main case, the other contacts the tailshaft).

Getting the tailshaft off isn't that big of a deal. I am wondering if it is possible to remove the bearing retainer plate without having to remove the countershaft and all those zillions of needle bearings?

AutoGear 05-13-2013 12:30 PM

Yes; but the reverse idlers are going to have to be removed. I would recommend pulling the mainshaft with the midplate attached and inspecting your synchros, sliders. and engagement teeth.

C&M Gearworks in Springfield Missouri can probably help you out if you need parts (417) 862-4455 ask for Chris or Dave, tell them Nate from Auto Gear sent you.

I have a vague dis-assembly description in one of our PDFs I can email you. Or, find a GM Motors Manual from the 70s. T10s from the 57-69 are a little bit different and have some quirks (especially the 1957-63) so if you have one of those, say so and we'll dig a little deeper. That should be a shielded 307 series bearing in the midplate. They're kind of expensive (usually around $50 for an SKF one) In theory you can use a regular 307 series, but warner spec'd that shield for a reason, so if you're driving it a lot, I'd put one back in. If you have trouble finding parts, I can help you

AutoGear 05-13-2013 12:40 PM

Also; if you are worried about the needles, don't be. There is a caged needle bearing kit for the 1" countershaft T10s and Muncies. Its like $25 bucks; but you literally drop 2 caged bearings in each end of the cluster gear, no spacer rings) and go. Its all we use anymore except under special circumstances

Silver Surfer 05-13-2013 01:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AutoGear (Post 1675282)
Also; if you are worried about the needles, don't be. There is a caged needle bearing kit for the 1" countershaft T10s and Muncies. Its like $25 bucks; but you literally drop 2 caged bearings in each end of the cluster gear, no spacer rings) and go. Its all we use anymore except under special circumstances

Gee that would have been nice to know a few years ago when I rebuilt this sucker! The trans actually has 0 miles on it. The bearings/synchro's are all new, so I am not worried about that. It has been sitting unused, but I am a novice at hot rodding and that was my first project...I boggered up the gaskets.

So the next question is, is it OK to use silcone (I plan on using Permatex The Right Stuff). I am just concerned that maybe the case/plate/tailshaft is warped and the thin gaskets are not thick enough to work.

Thanks for the reply!

Silver Surfer 05-13-2013 01:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AutoGear (Post 1675280)
Yes; but the reverse idlers are going to have to be removed. I would recommend pulling the mainshaft with the midplate attached and inspecting your synchros, sliders. and engagement teeth.

C&M Gearworks in Springfield Missouri can probably help you out if you need parts (417) 862-4455 ask for Chris or Dave, tell them Nate from Auto Gear sent you.

I have a vague dis-assembly description in one of our PDFs I can email you. Or, find a GM Motors Manual from the 70s. T10s from the 57-69 are a little bit different and have some quirks (especially the 1957-63) so if you have one of those, say so and we'll dig a little deeper. That should be a shielded 307 series bearing in the midplate. They're kind of expensive (usually around $50 for an SKF one) In theory you can use a regular 307 series, but warner spec'd that shield for a reason, so if you're driving it a lot, I'd put one back in. If you have trouble finding parts, I can help you

I also have the GM service bulletin from 1974 that goes through the rebuild. Little fuzzy graphics...but I fill in the rest with my imagination!

AutoGear 05-13-2013 02:08 PM

I'd use a low expansion RTV. I'll PM you with our service manual.

Silver Surfer 05-13-2013 02:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AutoGear (Post 1675307)
I'd use a low expansion RTV. I'll PM you with our service manual.

I can't thank you enough! You are a top notch guy!

Can you give me a specific brand/type of RTV to use? I am not sure how to validate if it is low expansion or not. :thumbup:

AutoGear 05-13-2013 02:32 PM

Loctite 518 for aluminum to aluminum; loctite 5900 for aluminum to aluminum and loctite 242 (blue) if you're going to be in and out of the unit often. Thats from my Loctite Rep.

In the shop we use Valco aluminum colored RTV with their 'tube grip' dispenser. I HIGHLY recommend the Tube Grip if you use a lot of toothpaste type tubes of sealer. You can lay a bead so narrow you can write your name with it in script. Valco is out of Cincinnati and a great company to do business with.

Silver Surfer 05-13-2013 09:05 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by AutoGear (Post 1675312)
Loctite 518 for aluminum to aluminum; loctite 5900 for aluminum to aluminum and loctite 242 (blue) if you're going to be in and out of the unit often. Thats from my Loctite Rep.

In the shop we use Valco aluminum colored RTV with their 'tube grip' dispenser. I HIGHLY recommend the Tube Grip if you use a lot of toothpaste type tubes of sealer. You can lay a bead so narrow you can write your name with it in script. Valco is out of Cincinnati and a great company to do business with.

I think I found the source of the leak...its a mysterious hole in the tail shaft. Any idea what this is for or what is supposed to go in there? From what I recall in the manuals there is no mention of this.:smash:

AutoGear 05-14-2013 07:39 AM

Hmmm I don't remember that hole. There could have been a locating dowel pin in there at some time. Or maybe someone tried to incorporate a vent (if both ball bearings have shields covering between the races on both sides, it should have had a vent). Unless someone else says otherwise here, plug it.
I dont have a T10 extension (tailhousing) handy to look at.

Anyone out there have a T10 tail they can eyeball for me?

Silver Surfer 05-14-2013 07:43 AM

There is a proper vent on the case above the side cover. The only thing I can think of is that maybe the gaskets changed and this hole should be blocked off by the bearing plate retainer gasket. I guess I will fill this in with some sealer. Perhaps it will too difficult to find a proper welch plug. I mic'd the hole and it is about .300" diameter.

Silver Surfer 05-14-2013 12:58 PM

I went to GM and looked through some old dusty books. No luck.

I called Richmond Gear and they said there is an alignment dowel pin that is pressed into the bearing retainer plate. That pin locates the tail housing and the case. And NO they don't sell the pin. So I hope maybe I have the pin in with all the zillions of old needle bearings. But even if I find it...how did it fall out in the first place?

lmsport 05-14-2013 03:29 PM

GForce sells every part for a T10, but I would try poster Autogear first.

Silver Surfer 05-14-2013 04:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lmsport (Post 1675563)
GForce sells every part for a T10, but I would try poster Autogear first.

If Richmond Gear doesn't even sell it, and they own the manufacturing rights to the ST-10, then I doubt anyone else would. Even if GForce does sell it, I am sure I would have to buy an entire small parts kit, if I am lucky. More than likely I would have to buy the entire bearing retainer plate. Probably best to make a dowel if I can't find it in my baggie of parts.

lmsport 05-14-2013 05:15 PM

1000043008 Midplate dowel
T10-55 OEM T10 gasket set

G-Force South


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