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Old 10-14-2010, 12:24 AM
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thermostat temp for 383 (sbc)

Im running a 160 degree temp thermostat in my 383 w/ forged internals and about 10:1 compression. The bad is that now that im in the north, its cold. My car takes to long to heat up, and having a chokeless mainbody dosent help. My question is, should i use a 195 degree thermostat? I have a very good cooling system, but with the engine running so cool i simply cant get my heater blowing even remotely warm and I just replaced the heater core anyway due to it leaking. I already have the thermostat, its a simple swap away, thanks.

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Old 10-14-2010, 12:31 AM
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Thermostat temp has nothing to do with how fast it warms up, just when it stops getting hotter.

For a street engine, the hotter the better (as long as no nucleate boiling is taking place).
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Old 10-14-2010, 12:56 AM
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IMO i would change it, you want your engine running around 200, my pontiac has a 195 thermo and it just hovers between 190 and 210 in the hottest of weather (a few months ago it was 118...) plus youll be getting the most out of your engine at that temp.
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Old 11-05-2010, 10:03 PM
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intake

heres a suggestion try using intake gaskets with restrictor plates in it put them towards the back it will help ur engine warm up faster and keep a more stable temp when driving
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Old 11-06-2010, 07:41 AM
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Ive always ran 180* T-stats in virtually every SBC Ive had. 160* is simply too cold. Sometimes a cooling system is actualy more efficent with a HOTTER T-stat because it gives the coolant in the radiator more time to cool down before flowing into the block. With too cold of an opening temp it can stay open constantly under certian circumstances not allowing the radiator time to do its job. I would definatly go with a hotter one.
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Old 11-06-2010, 07:49 AM
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I run a 180 degree t-stat and i don't know why but my engine heats up really quick. But one the t-stat opens it stays at 180, never higher, never lower, and that's will the oe cooling system.
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Old 11-08-2010, 03:05 AM
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Ditch the mechanical fan if you have one.. this alone can make a HUGE difference. my astro van used to take FOREVER to warm up in the winter, so I just took the fan off for the winter.. between the main heater and aux heater in the back. .and just making a point to not sit and idle for too long I made it through the michigan winters just fine :>

my '72 monte I dumped the mechanical fan for a pair of electrics.. and it warms up LICKETY-SPLIT in the winter

http://home.comcast.net/~kc8oye/Engine/DSC02408.JPG

this is low-buck home brew at it's finest the big fan is off an 80's GM something or other (no idea what exactly) the small fan is just a Hayden 10" fan from the parts store.. as it happened, the big fan apparently was designed to sit next to a 10" fan as it had a 'notch' molded into the shroud that fit that 10" fan exactly

big fan is two speed so I have it setup that the big fan comes on on low speed together with the small fan, around 190F (160 tstat) and the high speed on on the big fan is set for 200F ( I _RARELY_ actually reach 200)
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Old 11-08-2010, 12:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stroker444
Im running a 160 degree temp thermostat in my 383 w/ forged internals and about 10:1 compression. The bad is that now that im in the north, its cold. My car takes to long to heat up, and having a chokeless mainbody dosent help. My question is, should i use a 195 degree thermostat? I have a very good cooling system, but with the engine running so cool i simply cant get my heater blowing even remotely warm and I just replaced the heater core anyway due to it leaking. I already have the thermostat, its a simple swap away, thanks.
Yes you should between 180 and 195 should be perfect. Running the engine too cold does not allow it to achieve proper operating clearances and doesn't get the oil hot enough to vaporize water trapped in it. Lots of people think that water gets in the oil form atmospheric condensation, which it does, but most of that water comes from the blow by. Water is by weight about 1/2 of the exhaust material resulting from combustion of the fuel. In a too cold engine you get a double whammy especially with forged pistons which usually start with wider clearances than cast and then take longer to heat up and never get as hot as a cast piston, this increases the amount of blow by into the crankcase. Then add the oil never getting hot enough to boil out all this water and you've got the recipe for sludge and acid formation in the oil.

Add to that you've probably got an unheated intake and as you said a chokeless carb. To compensate the carb has to be run richer so that enough fuel will vaporize to burn and run the engine. The some unburnt excess fuel goes out the exhaust valve the rest joins the blow by which in the case of this setup washes the upper lube off the cylinder wall resulting with increased wear of the cylinder, piston, and rings as well as fuel (a solvent) contamination of the oil adding to the oils degradation as a lubricant.

By now you should see that this typical hot rod configuration is bad news for everything but that occasional top end power blast.

Remedial action would be to get the operating temps up with the thermostat. Proper lay out of the heater bypass plumbing which is tapped from the intake coolant return just ahead of the thermostat (this is pressure side of the pump) to the heater core. Then return to the fitting at the top of the pump if it is of that design or back to the pump intake side radiator tank. This forms a closed coolant loop where the pump recycles engine coolant thru the engine but not the radiator until the thermostat opens. This prevents the formation of hot spots around the exhaust valve seats and spark plugs, prevents pump cavitation beating bubbles into the coolant, and speeds the warm up.

I'd ditch the carb for something with a choke, this lets you lean out main metering so the carb is only rich on cold start. Things that help is heating the intake, this vaporizes the liquid fuel easing the amount you have throw into the motor to get something that burns in the cylinders. If you can't heat the intake, then using the GM factory air cleaner with a thermostatic bypass of incoming air to be selected from preheating off the exhaust manifold or headers when cold; then it switches to a cold air feed when the engine has warmed up and can tolerate drawing cold air without having to throw extra fuel at it to burn.

Another big help in cold climates is the factory radiator from mid 1980 vehicles to present. These include a engine oil heat exchanger in the return side coolant tank. These bring the oil up to temp very quickly and greatly reduce the time it takes to get the engine to operating temps. This warms the cold engine about 6 times faster than when this little trick isn't there.

Bogie
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Old 01-30-2011, 05:54 PM
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Just ran across old Continental Motors cylinder wall wear vs engine temp chart.

60 hour wear data as read from chart:

200F=0.0002"
180F=0.0004"
160F=0.0008"
140F=0.0012"
120F=0.0015"
100F=0.0022"
80F=0.003"
60F=0.004"
50F=0.0055"
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Old 01-30-2011, 06:49 PM
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Good call, Mustang. Many people don't realize the potential for added wear with cooler temps. So many people try to chase down 3 hp on the street with a cooler stat and sometimes miss the ball.
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