thinning resin - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Interior
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 11-16-2004, 08:21 AM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: tennessee
Posts: 5,909
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
thinning resin

Is it ok to thin fiberglass resin? If so with what? I am trying to repair a wood rimmed steering wheel and I want to tint the resin and use it for both a glue and a filler. Epoxy glues are much to thick and don't tint very well(with the powdered tint I have anyway). I have used this method on gun stocks to repair chips and imperfections but not tight areas like cracks that the epoxy will not easily flow into.

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 11-16-2004, 08:39 AM
OneMoreTime's Avatar
Hotrodders.com moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Health and safety in the shop or garage
Last journal entry: Yard Dog pic
Last photo:
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Washington State
Age: 69
Posts: 7,240
Wiki Edits: 3

Thanks: 38
Thanked 128 Times in 124 Posts
Thinning resin

Oldred,

I am assuming and that gets me in trouble.. that this is polyester resin that you are using..if it is use acetone to thin with. thin it first then mix the catalyst..this will probably slow the cure on it so use no more thinner thatn you absolutely have to...

Warming the material helps to thin it as well..warming will acellerate cure so be ready for that..

OMT
__________________
I have tried most all of it and now do what is known to work..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 11-16-2004, 09:00 AM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: tennessee
Posts: 5,909
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
It is epoxy resin, I guess I was a little confusing by mentioning the epoxy glue but what I meant was that regular epoxy glue is even thicker than epoxy fiberglass resin. What I am trying to do is to repair some small age cracks in the wood on this steering wheel and I am open to suggestions here. These really are not cracks in the sense that the wood is broken but are just small separations in the grain.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 11-16-2004, 09:17 AM
OneMoreTime's Avatar
Hotrodders.com moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Health and safety in the shop or garage
Last journal entry: Yard Dog pic
Last photo:
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Washington State
Age: 69
Posts: 7,240
Wiki Edits: 3

Thanks: 38
Thanked 128 Times in 124 Posts
Hobbypoxy

Oldred,
Have you a model shop in your area..the kind that has the big R/C airplanes and hydros..if you could get some of the epoxy finishing resin that woudl be good I think..

It is thinner and is clear and will give a nice finish..since it is a clear finish material it shoudl fill those cracks and give a nice finish to the wheel..

Should not take a whole lot of material to do a steering wheel..

I am assuming again here that there is nothing wrong with the structure of the wheel..we are just trying to gat a good finish on it..

OMT
__________________
I have tried most all of it and now do what is known to work..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 11-16-2004, 09:28 AM
willys36@aol.com's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: How to rebuild a Rochester Quadrajet 4MV carbureto...
Last journal entry: How to change auto shift timing on 200R4
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Bakersfield
Posts: 8,384
Wiki Edits: 21

Thanks: 1
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Don't use acetone. That is good for cleaning hands and tools but not for thinning resin. All fiberglass suppliers carry styrene monomer which is what is used in all polyester resin as a thinner. In fact, that smell we all know and love when using polyester resin is actually styrene monomer, not the polyester resin. It must be thinned since polyester resin in it's pure state is much too viscous to be practical.

Why do you want to thin the resin? Good resin form the suppliers is usually formulated for optimal wetting, buildup and vertical surface retention characteristics. I think the resin out of the can should do your wheel surfacing just fine. Get a good brand from an online store rather than the hardware store stuff.

Here are a few suppliers I use.

One
Two
Three
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 11-16-2004, 09:53 AM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: tennessee
Posts: 5,909
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
The reason I want to thin the resin is that although these cracks are not very wide they are deep(all the way down to the metal ring) and I wanted to get the resin to flow to the bottom.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 11-16-2004, 11:11 AM
willys36@aol.com's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: How to rebuild a Rochester Quadrajet 4MV carbureto...
Last journal entry: How to change auto shift timing on 200R4
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Bakersfield
Posts: 8,384
Wiki Edits: 21

Thanks: 1
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
I'm sure quality resin will permeate every crack in your wheel before it sets. Wash it down thoroughly with acetone (great use for the solvent!) to open the pores of the wood and remove any contaminates so the resin will soak in well.

I treated my 60s wooden wheel with several coats of boiled linseed oil. I like that much better than the resin approach since the oil will become part of the wood whereas the resin, no matter how well the wood is prepared, never really does. I have coated wood with resin only to have it separate some time down the road. The linseed oil definitely penetrates then hardens within a few days for permanent, very durable protection.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 11-16-2004, 11:35 AM
302 Z28's Avatar  
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2003
Location: North Texas
Posts: 10,837
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 86 Times in 73 Posts
Simply heat the mixture until it flows like you want. Bear in mind that heating the mixture will speed up it's flash time, so make allowances.

Vince
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Interior posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.