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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2009, 09:55 AM
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Wear safety glasses when using this stuff and especially if you use the HF China made chit. After spending 30 years as a machinist, I think I can say this with for good reason...and we threw away anything that came in from China. If you want to get hurt, use the cheap crap.
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2009, 11:20 AM
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The deal is you use this thread restorer tool (aka "thread chaser") for cleaning, deburring and straightening threads, NOT for creating new threads. When cleaning threads, you do not want to undercut the existing threads. Generally speaking, this means no metal removal- except as incidental to cleaning, deburring and straightening the threads themselves.

A decent set will have SAE coarse, fine and metric sized taps and dies for threaded holes or nuts as well as bolts, and should include thread files for SAE and metric sizes (thread files will also allow left hand external threads- like bolts- to be worked with).

The quality can vary a good deal. Some sets look to be either cast or poorly forged- they will have "parting" or "forging" lines running down their length. Obviously, these tools are inferior to a correctly designed and manufactured tool- and their cost will reflect this.

AFA making thread chasers from bolts, fine by me- but the cost in time money and aggravation of fouling up w/one is higher in many cases than the cost of the correct tool set to begin with- the same tool set that you could be using to clean up the threads of the tool you just made.
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2009, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cobalt327
AFA making thread chasers from bolts, fine by me- but the cost in time money and aggravation of fouling up w/one is higher in many cases than the cost of the correct tool set to begin with- the same tool set that you could be using to clean up the threads of the tool you just made.



Let me add a little more to what was said about the home made chasers, it was meant to be used when a "real" one is not available and it is not in any way a replacement to be used if the real ones are available, I don't think either of us who mentioned these home made ones meant that we should just make them instead of buying them. There are times when a hole or bolt needs some minor repair and a set of chasers are not handy or are difficult to find, such as I think was the original subject of this post. In these cases a home made one can work just fine in a pinch and can get someone out of a bind and it has worked several times for me when I needed one while working out in the boonies, I should have been a bit more clear about what I meant.
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Old 08-13-2009, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cranky1
Wear safety glasses when using this stuff and especially if you use the HF China made chit. After spending 30 years as a machinist, I think I can say this with for good reason...and we threw away anything that came in from China. If you want to get hurt, use the cheap crap.

You mean those HF 52 piece tap and die sets for $9.95 are no good?


I got a good laugh when I saw that set at one of their "parking lot" sales and just can't imagine what someone would have to be thinking to waste even $10 on a pile of worthless junk like that!
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2009, 01:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
it was meant to be used when a "real" one is not available
Understood.

Quote:
just can't imagine what someone would have to be thinking to waste even $10 on a pile of worthless junk like that!
Amen- if you look closely at them, you can see that if they're used as-is, the ragged cutting of the tap's threads will result in MUCH more material being removed (at least from the first times it's used- until the tap's threads are worn down).

The way they're made, the tap's threads are turned, THEN the flutes are cut- but they are then just left as-is, that's to say, the threads of the tap are blocked by the material that's only partially removed when the flutes are cut. Those pieces that are left clogging up the threaded portion of the tap will then break off as the tap's used- to the detriment of any hope of doing a decent job w/them.

Not worth having even if they were free, IMO.
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Old 08-13-2009, 11:44 PM
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I used a thread chaser and still managed to pull out the threads on one of the holes in the block.
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 08-14-2009, 10:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittbull7934
I used a thread chaser and still managed to pull out the threads on one of the holes in the block.
It happens. I've seen blocks that had pulled threads- and I never saw one that I didn't suspect that the threads had been previously "cleaned" by some well-meaning guy w/a regular tap.

Using a reg. tap removes an incredible amount of metal from an otherwise good threaded hole. So, not your fault, at least. But that doesn't help much, I know!
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Old 08-14-2009, 02:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cobalt327
It happens. I've seen blocks that had pulled threads- and I never saw one that I didn't suspect that the threads had been previously "cleaned" by some well-meaning guy w/a regular tap.

Using a reg. tap removes an incredible amount of metal from an otherwise good threaded hole. So, not your fault, at least. But that doesn't help much, I know!

Yea it stinks, Once i get the helicoil in there i will be a bit more relieved, I'm a bit nervous about installing it.

this project is costing me a small fortune and I am finding great deals on stuff. I am sure it will be worth it in the end though.
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 08-14-2009, 06:21 PM
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In a bind if you don't have a thread chaser, take an old tap and chuck it up in a drill and run a piece of emory cloth or sandpaper around it while running. Do this in forward and reverse on the drill. It will dull the cutting edges of the tap, but still be useable to clean up your threads. A sharp tap will cut going in and coming out if not held exact. Don't run a tap in dry as it can gall and pull the threads. Always use oil or a tapping lubricant.
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