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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 11-16-2013, 12:25 PM
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I'm sure once I get my english wheel it will make sense to have the good tools at home. The whole purpose of wanting some quicker cutting tools is to avoid the frustration of cutt off wheels and spitting out metal everywhere. not something I want to be doing at home. A smooth easy cut and less metal all over the garage on top of a beer or two is the atmosphere I want in my garage.

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 11-16-2013, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by timothale View Post
I was using my black and decker # 12 shear to trim some parts for my son's 22 Dodge lakester and hit a welded tab on the back and broke a cutter piece. they wanted $ 90 for the repair piece. some one in the street rod class at UVU had a HF knock off that worked ok, so I bought one for $ 25 on sale , it's still working.
18 Gauge Sheet Metal Shear
It takes a few minutes to get the cutters adjusted .
There's really good reviews on this tool that even include part numbers for replacement blades. My tool list is long right now so I might go with this one.
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 11-17-2013, 08:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
I'm sure once I get my english wheel it will make sense to have the good tools at home. The whole purpose of wanting some quicker cutting tools is to avoid the frustration of cutt off wheels and spitting out metal everywhere. not something I want to be doing at home. A smooth easy cut and less metal all over the garage on top of a beer or two is the atmosphere I want in my garage.
At the shop, I see WAY, WAY too much use of the cut off wheel. A spot weld drill is so much better it isn't funny, less noise, less metal to breath (YES breath) no sparks, easier on the body, it simply is far better but people have such a twisted image of time, they just don't see it. "Grinder, lots of noise, sparks, it working fast ugg".

Brian
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 11-17-2013, 10:14 AM
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Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
At the shop, I see WAY, WAY too much use of the cut off wheel. A spot weld drill is so much better it isn't funny, less noise, less metal to breath (YES breath) no sparks, easier on the body, it simply is far better but people have such a twisted image of time, they just don't see it. "Grinder, lots of noise, sparks, it working fast ugg".

Brian
I agree. If my cheap boss would get me spot weld bits I wouldn't mind drilling out every spot weld possible. I'm not spending another dollar on bits for work, but at home I have brand new bits still in the package-lol

I go thru phases...if the boss is being cheap I always feel like bringing my good tools home cause it's not worth it. When things are going fine I want to bring em back. "This shop is not worthy of my IR drill!" j/k.
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 11-17-2013, 12:15 PM
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I have a pair of what were called duct snips - they look like the manual version of those Milwaukee electric snips - great for straight cutting in the middle of a long piece of metal. two cutting surfaces with about a 3/16" waste strip that curls up leaving the two sides flat.
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Old 11-17-2013, 01:05 PM
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I think I'm going to buy the HF throatless shear(wanabee beverly shear) and the Milwaukee shears that Martin suggested. I've watched some videos and those fake beverly shears seem to make the final cuts pretty efficiently. I'm going to get The Milwaukee shears cause I don't see any other that's 6 amps in that price range. This will address two issues that would have demotivated me from wanting to go out there and cut up metal...long straight cuts and final cuts. This will allow me to get down to the fun stuff of metal shaping instead of wasting energy with cut off wheels and trying to use a die grinder to get to the scribe line.(at myself)
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 11-17-2013, 06:24 PM
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I have all sorts of Wiss tinsnips. L-R-Straight, offsets, etc. and use them all depending on what I'm doing. Mostly I use the standard red right hand, as they do 75% of what I need to do. I also have tinner's snips, and they aren't anything like tin snips. They have long handles with loop handles on the end. The jaws are about 3.5"-4" long, and they have tons of leverage for thicker metal. They're also much better for making nice straight cuts. I inherited mine from my father, and they're probably 1920's vintage, and never been sharpened. Still cut beautifully!
Here's a picture of tinner's snips:


Cooper Tools Straight Pattern Tinner's Snips - 8 1/4in straight patternsnips | Wayfair
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 11-18-2013, 08:38 AM
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those are nice!. Instead of the Milwaukee shears I said I was going to get I went ahead and got some other Milwaukee shears. They are the 6805 16 gauge throatless shears. They cost around $350 new but I just won a pair on E Bay for $150. Has a broken adjustment screw but it's a brand new pair of shears. Not one scratch on it. With these I can cut up large pieces of sheet metal as well as cutting straight to the cut line. Next I will go get some offset snips and hold off on the knock off Beverly shear for now anyways. I can always get that later. Thanks for all the help guys. I really wanted to take the work out of cutting and think I did a good job here. Thanks again! I will come back and post pics and give a review of the tool once I get it.
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Old 11-18-2013, 09:50 AM
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Bill gives a good explanation of the proper use and application of tin snips in this video. He is an accomplished metal worker as evidenced by some of his other videos, expecially the shop tour. If you click on the utube version it will give you access to his other videos.
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 11-18-2013, 10:05 AM
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Very nice video! Was glad to see him address the proper way to cutting off larger pieces, as most people complain about distortion when trying to cut too much with tin snips. They're just not made to do anything beyond final trimming, so you need to cut away a large part before using them for final trimming to avoid distortion.
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Old 11-18-2013, 01:29 PM
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Lots of ways to skin this cat. Some times a air nibbler is the ticket. Takes a good compresser and the chips it makes are a pain to clean up and they get in to every thing in the shop but they cut either direction and can cut a tighter radius than most tin snips. I use a double cut kind of shears some times. They cut a ribbon out of the work tho so theres some loss of material that makes them not so good for some work but theyre quick and clean and will cut both L and R too. For strait cuts I like a alum. bodied hand shear with a 3 or 3 and a half in. cut with a lot of leverage like 14 in long. Needs replaceable blades too cause one nick can ruin a good shear.
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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 11-19-2013, 07:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chevymon View Post
Bill gives a good explanation of the proper use and application of tin snips in this video. He is an accomplished metal worker as evidenced by some of his other videos, expecially the shop tour. If you click on the utube version it will give you access to his other videos.
Using Tin Snips - YouTube
wow! Never knew all that, but most of it was common sense.
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 11-20-2013, 08:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chevymon View Post
Bill gives a good explanation of the proper use and application of tin snips in this video. He is an accomplished metal worker as evidenced by some of his other videos, expecially the shop tour. If you click on the utube version it will give you access to his other videos.
Using Tin Snips - YouTube
What a great video! I learned a pile of stuff, very, very good. It's wonderful that a guy will take the time to do something like that for us.

Brian
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 11-20-2013, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
What a great video! I learned a pile of stuff, very, very good. It's wonderful that a guy will take the time to do something like that for us.

Brian
Yea, it really is. We have a couple of guys on here like that......Lots of good tutorials for body and interior too. I don't think anyone on here has put more effort into taking the time make tutorials than MartinSR.

I thank all you guys that share the knowledge and experience it has taken you years to acquire. I, for one, am a very happy recipient.

John
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 11-20-2013, 02:21 PM
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I like using hand tools when I can. Primal thing? I also bought the HF electric shear shown elsewhere in this thread and it worked very well right out of the box. FWIW
Baliegh make a Beverly shear knock off that looks good. I just have not seen any reviews yet. Interested.
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