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Old 11-15-2013, 10:38 AM
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tin snips

I know Wiss is good but I have never owned a brand new pair. All my snips have been swap meet ones and not very good. So I'd like to get the Wiss L/R snips and you get a better deal if you also get the yellow straight cuts as a 3 pc set, but I don't plan on using the Wiss straight cut ones very often, maybe those will be used at work and not my garage, where all my good tools are. My question is, Covell recommended 12" tinners snips for straight cuts but didn't say much about good ones. I hear there's an $80 Proto one that's good but would like to get more opinions on this. Any suggestions? I'll be using it for 18 gauge.

I also got a question about electrical shears. Got a milwaukee and bought new blades for it and it still doesn't cut well. Are these a pain to adjust the blades right? It's kind of turning me off to electrical shears but I keep hearing good things about Kett. Any thoughts appreciated?

My old ways of cut off wheels and die grinders are great for a body shop but not so great if I'm trying to enjoy myself fabbing in my garage. who wants to cut large pieces with a cut off wheel? I don't.

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Old 11-15-2013, 12:32 PM
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what you really need is a plasma cutter . LOL!! That is my next "big" purchase. i just looked in my box and all my snips are blue point and have never had a problem with them. i have a milwaukee electrical shear also have in the past had a crappy set of blades thin and they would kind of pull it to the side.
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Old 11-15-2013, 12:52 PM
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I have a pair of Wiss tinners snips and just don't get it at all how you can use them without distorting the edge. I bow at Ron Covel's feet, he is a master and one of my favorite mentors. I have never discussed this with him and if I remember will next time I see him. But honestly, I don't get it at all, the metal has no where to "fall" when it comes off the blade.

What I use exclusively for cutting sheetmetal (if I choose to use snips) are Wiss or Midwest (I think that's the name) offset snips. I do everything with left and right offset, even straight cuts. They let the metal "fall" off leaving both sides perfect with no distortion.

I have all the others, straight, tinners, and others, I only use the two red and green handled left and right offsets. I am apparently missing something but that is all I use.

On the used ones, that is like buying used toilet paper, you could, it is still usable.

They wear, I have actually thrown away a few pairs of each, when they are sharp you REALLY see a difference.

I am going to go talk with my fab guy here that has been learning me, see what he says on this subject.

Brian
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Old 11-15-2013, 01:09 PM
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i use a cutoff wheel in a grinder for all my sheetmetal cutting any more
i worked with a lot tin knockers back in the 80s, they'd straight cut duct with 2 pairs of wiss snips
using a left and a right, they cut 2 lines an inch apart that left a center curl and 2 straight pieces of duct.
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Old 11-15-2013, 02:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre View Post
i use a cutoff wheel in a grinder for all my sheetmetal cutting any more
i worked with a lot tin knockers back in the 80s, they'd straight cut duct with 2 pairs of wiss snips
using a left and a right, they cut 2 lines an inch apart that left a center curl and 2 straight pieces of duct.
This is true. If your snips are not sharp they will also stretch the metal and distort the shape. I frequently use my shrinker jaws to bring the piece back to square. My inner rockers are an example. After I trimmed the flange off of them, they had a distinct curve in them.

My Beverly Shear is a really great tool but they are not cheap. Mine was a gift from a neighbor who had sold his furnace company 40 years ago. It is indeed a blessing to have though.

I also like a 4 1/2 inch cut of disk in a small side grinder but be careful. If you let it bind up it WILL come apart and they can be dangerous. Use caution and eye protection.

John
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Old 11-15-2013, 02:27 PM
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Yeah in talking to my friend, he agreed, offset snips are the way to go. But on a long straight cut he said he uses an electric shear to within a quarter inch then trips it to perfection with the offset snips. He prefers Midwest brand and I am going to give them a try.

Amazon.com: midwest offset snips

He did give one very interesting tip that he learned from a fabricator he worked with, turn the offset snips upside down! You can see where you are cutting much better, and again, I'll give it a try, he hasn't steered me wrong yet.

I do have one of these, and AWESOME tool for that rough cut.



Brian
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Old 11-16-2013, 01:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
I have a pair of Wiss tinners snips and just don't get it at all how you can use them without distorting the edge. I bow at Ron Covel's feet, he is a master and one of my favorite mentors. I have never discussed this with him and if I remember will next time I see him. But honestly, I don't get it at all, the metal has no where to "fall" when it comes off the blade.

What I use exclusively for cutting sheetmetal (if I choose to use snips) are Wiss or Midwest (I think that's the name) offset snips. I do everything with left and right offset, even straight cuts. They let the metal "fall" off leaving both sides perfect with no distortion.

I have all the others, straight, tinners, and others, I only use the two red and green handled left and right offsets. I am apparently missing something but that is all I use.

On the used ones, that is like buying used toilet paper, you could, it is still usable.

They wear, I have actually thrown away a few pairs of each, when they are sharp you REALLY see a difference.

I am going to go talk with my fab guy here that has been learning me, see what he says on this subject.

Brian
is there a difference between tinner's snips and aviation snips? I think Covell was saying don't use the straight cut yellow ones and get 12" tinner snips, not aviation snips. If there's a good one out there for your average size patch that's too short to constitute getting out the electrical shears yet too long to use with your average wiss snips, than I'd be interested in getting it. What I really want is a small bench shear but in a pair of scissors but I doubt one even exists. those little bench shears cut like butter but are pricey.
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Old 11-16-2013, 01:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John long View Post
This is true. If your snips are not sharp they will also stretch the metal and distort the shape. I frequently use my shrinker jaws to bring the piece back to square. My inner rockers are an example. After I trimmed the flange off of them, they had a distinct curve in them.

My Beverly Shear is a really great tool but they are not cheap. Mine was a gift from a neighbor who had sold his furnace company 40 years ago. It is indeed a blessing to have though.

I also like a 4 1/2 inch cut of disk in a small side grinder but be careful. If you let it bind up it WILL come apart and they can be dangerous. Use caution and eye protection.

John
yeah, those beverly shears are simply a metal man's dream.
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Old 11-16-2013, 01:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
Yeah in talking to my friend, he agreed, offset snips are the way to go. But on a long straight cut he said he uses an electric shear to within a quarter inch then trips it to perfection with the offset snips. He prefers Midwest brand and I am going to give them a try.

Amazon.com: midwest offset snips

He did give one very interesting tip that he learned from a fabricator he worked with, turn the offset snips upside down! You can see where you are cutting much better, and again, I'll give it a try, he hasn't steered me wrong yet.

I do have one of these, and AWESOME tool for that rough cut.



Brian
that's looks like the one I have. the model I have is a little older I think. I guess I'll take off the head and see if there's any adjustments.

Last edited by tech69; 11-16-2013 at 01:26 AM.
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Old 11-16-2013, 08:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
is there a difference between tinner's snips and aviation snips? I think Covell was saying don't use the straight cut yellow ones and get 12" tinner snips, not aviation snips. If there's a good one out there for your average size patch that's too short to constitute getting out the electrical shears yet too long to use with your average wiss snips, than I'd be interested in getting it. What I really want is a small bench shear but in a pair of scissors but I doubt one even exists. those little bench shears cut like butter but are pricey.

I believe the "aviation snips" are the small ones. And "Klein" that was the other brand I was thinking of earlier.



"Tinners" are the longer ones.



On the bench cutter, it's called a "Throatless" shear and there are many different ones, quality is not cheap. "Beverly" seems to be the standard of the industry I have heard them referred to as "Beverly shears" before.



Beverly SS-2 Slitting Shear Sheet Metal Fabrication

I have one of these.



Grizzly G9947 Mini sheet Meta Length Cutter - Amazon.com Grizzly G9947 Mini sheet Meta Length Cutter - Amazon.com

In my opinion it is close to worthless. My electric shears do everything this will do and better. So don't waste your money on it cheaping out like I did, just bust open the wallet and get the throatless. I am certainly no tin-man sheet metal fabricator by any stretch of the imagination so maybe there is a use for it, I don't see it.

Brian
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Old 11-16-2013, 08:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
is there a difference between tinner's snips and aviation snips? I think Covell was saying don't use the straight cut yellow ones and get 12" tinner snips, not aviation snips. If there's a good one out there for your average size patch that's too short to constitute getting out the electrical shears yet too long to use with your average wiss snips, than I'd be interested in getting it. What I really want is a small bench shear but in a pair of scissors but I doubt one even exists. those little bench shears cut like butter but are pricey.
After cutting away the majority of the piece with the electric shear and leaving a quarter inch of metal. Then "fine lining" that last cut with offset tin snips is my way, and my mentor at work agreed.

For cutting down the length of a quarter panel to install the bottom half, this is exactly how I would do it. Doing collision work every day, I used my left and right cut offsets every time when splicing a C pillar or rocker. To get it close enough to butt weld, cutting it off (in this case with a die grinder and 1/32" disc) leaving a quarter inch or so extra then fine tuning it to perfection with the offset Wiss snips creating a near perfect butt to weld. Quality, good condition (sharp) offset snips are THE tool for this stuff in my opinion. Even on something like the edge of a quarter where it goes into the door jam with all the folds and angles and what not, they are SOOOOO good at sniping off little bits they even work there!

Brian
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Old 11-16-2013, 08:47 AM
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power shear

I was using my black and decker # 12 shear to trim some parts for my son's 22 Dodge lakester and hit a welded tab on the back and broke a cutter piece. they wanted $ 90 for the repair piece. some one in the street rod class at UVU had a HF knock off that worked ok, so I bought one for $ 25 on sale , it's still working.
18 Gauge Sheet Metal Shear
It takes a few minutes to get the cutters adjusted .
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Old 11-16-2013, 09:10 AM
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Lazze likes those kinds of shears. They look like they cut really nice. The only concern I'd have with the HF ones are how long they stay sharp and replacement blades. I'll do some more net searching on those type of shears, maybe look for some footage of a metal god using one and I'll be hooked.
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Old 11-16-2013, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
After cutting away the majority of the piece with the electric shear and leaving a quarter inch of metal. Then "fine lining" that last cut with offset tin snips is my way, and my mentor at work agreed.

For cutting down the length of a quarter panel to install the bottom half, this is exactly how I would do it. Doing collision work every day, I used my left and right cut offsets every time when splicing a C pillar or rocker. To get it close enough to butt weld, cutting it off (in this case with a die grinder and 1/32" disc) leaving a quarter inch or so extra then fine tuning it to perfection with the offset Wiss snips creating a near perfect butt to weld. Quality, good condition (sharp) offset snips are THE tool for this stuff in my opinion. Even on something like the edge of a quarter where it goes into the door jam with all the folds and angles and what not, they are SOOOOO good at sniping off little bits they even work there!

Brian
never had a pair of the offset. Look like they're designed for the metal to roll away easier with less tension. Thanks for that. I just guessed they were just a newer design of the standard ones. I'd like to go grab some today but with black friday around the corner I might just wait it out for my annual Sears run.

I went out to the garage and checked out my electrical shears and even though it says it's for 18 gauge it also says it's only 3.5 amps, so now I'm not even sure if it's got enough guts to satisfy me. I might have to just stop being so cheap and get a new pair. If it's to remedy a task I dislike, I won't mind spending money...then again I might horde it. Just the other day I asked myself... "why is my cheap HF drill that strips out chuck keys at work while my $200 IR variable speed hand twist chuck drill that I've used twice is at home?" makes no sense. I might as well be in the garage right now on my hands and knees polishing it.
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Old 11-16-2013, 09:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
never had a pair of the offset. Look like they're designed for the metal to roll away easier with less tension. Thanks for that. I just guessed they were just a newer design of the standard ones. I'd like to go grab some today but with black friday around the corner I might just wait it out for my annual Sears run.

I went out to the garage and checked out my electrical shears and even though it says it's for 18 gauge it also says it's only 3.5 amps, so now I'm not even sure if it's got enough guts to satisfy me. I might have to just stop being so cheap and get a new pair. If it's to remedy a task I dislike, I won't mind spending money...then again I might horde it. Just the other day I asked myself... "why is my cheap HF drill that strips out chuck keys at work while my $200 IR variable speed hand twist chuck drill that I've used twice is at home?" makes no sense. I might as well be in the garage right now on my hands and knees polishing it.
Exactly, that is why I brought all my good tools HOME, I asked myself the same question, why am I storing my good tools at work and using my crap tools at home?

Brian
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