Tip of the day #40, hanging panels by yourself. - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
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Old 01-04-2006, 06:50 PM
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Tip of the day #40, hanging panels by yourself.

If your like me and usually don't have help (or when your dad helps, he has no patience for getting things into position and starting bolts) here is what I have done after jambing parts and its time to install them. For doors they have a stand for installing them yourself, but I don't have one. I stack tires and blocks of wood so the height is above the rocker, and set the door on the tires, and have it set in the open position where it will line up at the right angle with the hinges. I've also seen mentioned that you can take a bolt the same thread is the plate in the door that the hinges are bolted to, and cut the head off the bolt and use one in one of the upper hinge threads and one in the lower is an alignment aid, then once you have the door in place and the other bolts started, unthread the studs you used for alignment and start those bolts. I haven't done that yet though. Some cars are pretty cramped quarters where you have to start your bolts. Most deck lids are not too bad. Get you bolts and ratchet ready and set where you can reach them on each side by the hinge. Grab the decklid with your hand supporting the back in the middle and place above your hinges. Keep supporting the back of the decklid with your hand, let the deck lid rest on your head or shoulder, and with your free hand start your bolts and tighten. Once it is in place and the bolts are tightened, then you can worry about adjustment. You may want to place some blankets (jim an electric may work, but really wouldn't have to turn it on, for those that get the joke) on the car where the back of the decklid meets in case it does slip back too far. Some smaller, lighter hoods you can also install yourself. Grab one hand on each side of the hood, rest the front of the hood against your body or legs for leverage, and carefully set between the fenders, then you can work it up toward the hinges. The real challange was when I put a large heavy hood on a mustang which hinges have springs and stay in the up position. This I did by finding away to hang the hood, and had the car set in neutral. Then i swung the hood up over the hinges as I rolled the car forward. Wasn't too fun to do and worrying about new paint besides. I suggest you wait with a decent side hood until you have help. Just be safe when doing things by yourself, and remember getting a scratch or damaging something, is better then you being hurt. One thing not to do by yourself. Don't load a toolbox full with tools into your truck by yourself. Empty the thing out and take out the drawers. I was in a hurry and it was only a small box, but my back hurt for awhile after that.
Sometimes you should just wait till you have help available. Use your best discretion.

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Old 01-04-2006, 07:07 PM
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obne great way to do hoods or decklids on a car that doesnt have to be factory perfect is to slot the upper bolt holes on the hinge, and then install the coresdponding bolt part way

prop the hinges up, slide panel into place, push up on the latch end of the hood so the panel is fully against the hinges and install your other bolts

... another thing ive done, a favorite of mine on chrysler minivan hoods, was to take 2 pieces of very stiff foam , lay one on each side of the cowlnext to each hinge, and then set the hood down on them, you could then lift the front of the hood till you could run a bolt thru the hinges. get a bolt in on each side and you could prop the hood on the rod and finish tightening down the hood

did TONS of vans this way , along with plenty of other chrysler jeep and vw cars that had prop rods (doesnt work on cars with spung or shocked hinges)
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Old 01-04-2006, 10:22 PM
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Great tip! Layers of cardboard on the cowl, windshield and back glass will also avoid any damage. Blankets work well (heated or non heated ). Doors and decklids I mount without help usually. My Wife has even helped with a few hoods when nobody else was available.
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Old 01-04-2006, 10:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baddbob
Great tip! Layers of cardboard on the cowl, windshield and back glass will also avoid any damage. Blankets work well (heated or non heated ). Doors and decklids I mount without help usually. My Wife has even helped with a few hoods when nobody else was available.

the nice thing about the foam blocks i had was that they were like 2 1/2 inches thick, and they deformed just enough to hold onto the edge of the hood as i raised it

they made great kneelers too, and wouldnt leave a mark when used to beat on coworkers ....

very universal "tool" to have, lol
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Old 01-05-2006, 03:27 AM
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Quote:
My Wife has even helped with a few hoods when nobody else was available.
So Bob, are you suggesting I place an ad, wanted a good women, must look good mounting a hood? LOL
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Old 01-05-2006, 04:48 AM
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Great tips Kenseth, thanks.
(I guess I'll always be known for the electric blanket-LOL)
I also use carpet squares for supporting work, the kind
that carpet stores have for samples. They're bordered and
only a couple of feet long. Most stores will sell them and some will give
them away when discontinued.
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Old 01-05-2006, 05:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baddbob
Great tip! Layers of cardboard on the cowl, windshield and back glass will also avoid any damage. Blankets work well (heated or non heated ). Doors and decklids I mount without help usually. My Wife has even helped with a few hoods when nobody else was available.
LOL

When you live in the country like I do, the wife gets used pretty often.
She can hang hoods with the best of them and pretty good on the engine hoist.
Barry
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Old 01-05-2006, 05:11 AM
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Yea Barry, my wife too. She's pretty good at helping as long as
it's not very heavy. She's my best and most expesive tool!!!
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Old 01-05-2006, 05:27 AM
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hanging panels by yourself

I dont live in the country but my wife gets used quite often also, sometimes in the garage LOL. seriously she doesnt understand why my garage doesnt look like the "fantasy" garages they show on tv. unfortunately mine is more like an indoor junkyard and I dont see that changing any time soon.
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Old 01-05-2006, 03:59 PM
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The agreement we have is I'm not allowed to put anything in her garage and she is not to make any comments about my garage. (my playhouse)
Its worked good for the last 4 years.
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Old 01-05-2006, 04:13 PM
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Quote:
I also use carpet squares for supporting work, the kind
that carpet stores have for samples. They're bordered and
only a couple of feet long. Most stores will sell them and some will give
them away when discontinued.
My brother has been installing carpeting and flooring for a large store that sells and installs carpet and glass and stuff like that. I don't see getting freebies of them being a problem. Makes a heck of a lot more then me too, both his wage at his job and the amount of side jobs he does. He has worked in a few packers players homes. I don't think his job is as dirty or as nasty of chemicals either.
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Old 01-06-2006, 04:30 AM
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For hoods and deck lids, I usually like to use bubble wrap. It is somewhat flexible as far as thickness goes, for adjusting it a little bit for hole alignment.

On hanging doors, if the fender is off, I usually put rags, or masking tape, on the inside jambs, and close the door. letting the latch hold it in place while installing the hinge bolts.

Always put masking tape on the edges to prevent chipping if something slips.

Aaron
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Old 01-06-2006, 05:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adtkart
Always put masking tape on the edges to prevent chipping if something slips.
Aaron
Good point Aaron, I mask off edges too.
I heard somewhere that there's a "special" masking tape that
is designed just for that, protecting adjacent surfaces.
It's made more durable and is used to cover adjacent panels when sanding
and working close to one.

Does anyone know if this stuff is out there and if so where can you get it?
This may be a good tip of the day.
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Old 01-06-2006, 10:11 AM
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hangin doors

Hi All,
I had my father in law (owned body shop) help me with a door once. He used and floor jack and block of wood (2x4). Like lining up a trans... cut the head of the bolt off and screw into door. This will align (could put nuts on snug it up) temporarily so you coul get the remailing bolts in.
Scooter
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Old 01-06-2006, 06:52 PM
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Jim
I hadn't heard of that tape before, but am sure the painters at work would appreciate me getting some. I usually tape panels next to where I am working, but once in a while will sand thru them by accident. Don't take much to go thru regular masking tape.

I do know some guys that use duct tape for that.

Aaron
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