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-   -   Tool to install crank sprocket on a SBC? (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/tool-install-crank-sprocket-sbc-141180.html)

v8hed 06-29-2008 06:20 PM

Tool to install crank sprocket on a SBC?
 
In the process of swapping my cam and may swap-out my timing set at the same time (although this one has only covered 6k miles). Is there a tool to re-install the crank sprocket? I have a 3-jaw puller to get it off, but have no specific tool to get it back on again.

Thanks.

Frisco 06-29-2008 06:37 PM

The crank sprocket should be a LIGHT tap fit and can be installed without any special tools. It should actually slip over the crankshaft and start over the woodruff key before any pressure is required to complete the installation.Tap lightly going around or alternating sides of the sprocket staying close to the crankshaft and away from the sprocket teeth. A pipe that can be slipped over the crankshaft with minimal clearance can also be used to apply the "tapping" force more evenly. Be sure that the sprocket is fully seated (bottomed out) against the shoulder of the crankshaft.

v8hed 06-29-2008 06:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Frisco
The crank sprocket should be a LIGHT tap fit and can be installed without any special tools. It should actually slip over the crankshaft and start over the woodruff key before any pressure is required to complete the installation.Tap lightly going around or alternating sides of the sprocket staying close to the crankshaft and away from the sprocket teeth. A pipe that can be slipped over the crankshaft with minimal clearance can also be used to apply the "tapping" force more evenly. Be sure that the sprocket is fully seated (bottomed out) against the shoulder of the crankshaft.

Great, thanks :)

CNC BLOCKS NE 06-29-2008 08:33 PM

We use a propane torch warm the gear up it will slide right on. We just had a crank in the shop to balance that some beat the gear on with a punchm Ahh we got a good laugh out it any ways.

speedydeedy 06-29-2008 09:03 PM

You have to know when to tap and when to beat. The crank sprocket is a tap.

CNC BLOCKS NE 06-29-2008 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by speedydeedy
You have to know when to tap and when to beat. The crank sprocket is a tap.

Depends on the interfearance fit how easy it goes on as I have seen alot of guys beat them on as they did go on hard. They all don't have the same fit!!

speedydeedy 06-29-2008 09:26 PM

I know all are different but in general you don't have to beat them on.

1drwgn 06-29-2008 10:14 PM

its easier to do with a large deep socket to get even pressure around gear then give it the ol adjusting tool.

sbchevfreak 06-30-2008 12:37 AM

I do the same as CNC, but I use a hot plate with a mesh screen on it to get more even heat. A few minutes on this, flip once, and the same on that side, and it will slide on without effort.

v8hed 06-30-2008 03:43 AM

Thanks guys... I'll use the gear puller to get the old gear off and I'll try tapping the new gear on. If that doesn't work, I'll heat with a blowtorch and install with oven mitt ;)

540z 07-01-2008 09:38 PM

Do you have a harmonic balancer (thrust bearing type) installation tool? The type that threads into the bolt threads in the crankshaft? If so, cut yourself a piece of 1 1/4" ID pipe about 2 1/2" long to work as a spacer. Use the pipe in conjunction with the balancer tool.

1. Just warm up the crank gear in the oven (about 300 degrees for about 20 minutes).
2. Grab it with your gloved hand, line it up with the keyway and slide the gear, chamfered side first, onto the pre-oiled crankshaft nose.
3. Place the pipe between the thrust washer of the balancer tool and the gear, quickly thread the balancer tool into the crank nose, and turn the nut against the thrust washer, which pushes on the pipe and in turn pushes the pipe against the crank gear.
I hope this helps,
TR

engineczar 07-02-2008 07:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 540z
Do you have a harmonic balancer (thrust bearing type) installation tool? The type that threads into the bolt threads in the crankshaft? If so, cut yourself a piece of 1 1/4" ID pipe about 2 1/2" long to work as a spacer. Use the pipe in conjunction with the balancer tool.

1. Just warm up the crank gear in the oven (about 300 degrees for about 20 minutes).
2. Grab it with your gloved hand, line it up with the keyway and slide the gear, chamfered side first, onto the pre-oiled crankshaft nose.
3. Place the pipe between the thrust washer of the balancer tool and the gear, quickly thread the balancer tool into the crank nose, and turn the nut against the thrust washer, which pushes on the pipe and in turn pushes the pipe against the crank gear.
I hope this helps,
TR

This is almost exactly the method I use except I don't heat anything. What I use is a piece of square tubing that has an inside dimension just larger than the snout diameter (1.25) and long enough to ensure the gear is seated. The ends of the tubing are milled square. I then press it on with my balancer installer. By using square tubing I find that there's clearance for the key and it still contacts the gear and my installation tool.

CNC BLOCKS NE 07-02-2008 07:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by engineczar
This is almost exactly the method I use except I don't heat anything. What I use is a piece of square tubing that has an inside dimension just larger than the snout diameter (1.25) and long enough to ensure the gear is seated. The ends of the tubing are milled square. I then press it on with my balancer installer. By using square tubing I find that there's clearance for the key and it still contacts the gear and my installation tool.

How does that work on a 283 or 327 crank that has no threads for the installer?

v8hed 07-02-2008 07:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by engineczar
This is almost exactly the method I use except I don't heat anything. What I use is a piece of square tubing that has an inside dimension just larger than the snout diameter (1.25) and long enough to ensure the gear is seated. The ends of the tubing are milled square. I then press it on with my balancer installer. By using square tubing I find that there's clearance for the key and it still contacts the gear and my installation tool.

Has anyone got a pic of this set-up, just so I'm clear? Is there any danger of stripping the crank snout threads by doing this?

Thanks.

Stroke 07-02-2008 09:30 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Dunno about all that hammerin' and tappin' stuff. Contrary to popular belief, there is a tool made just for the task you describe. Of course, like CNC said about fitment and no thread snouts. Looks like this...


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