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Old 07-11-2010, 08:48 PM
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Topcoat on concrete driveway?

Hi all; just did a search on concrete sealers for garage floors,
and was wondering if a newly poured driveway going to the
garage should be sealed?

Even though it's exposed to the weather, I assume a sealer would
make the driveway last longer?

Thanks,
ROE

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Old 07-11-2010, 09:15 PM
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I let my new driveway cure for about 60 days, and then put a coat of Euco-Guard 100 on it. It is a siloxane sealer. This clear liquid coating has 10% solids which penetrate the concrete pores and seals them. The first couple of rains will bead up on the surface, but it is not slippery when wet. Apply about once every 8 years thereafter.
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Old 07-14-2010, 06:36 AM
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Many thanks, Cucumber. I'll look into the Euco-Guard 100.
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Old 07-30-2010, 08:32 PM
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OK, I had my driveway poured today, and the finisher
recommended I seal it ....TOMORROW..... with a product
called Eagle concrete sealant. Sold at Home Depot.

I thought fresh concrete should cure for about 28 days at
least before sealing....?

I'm having to spray it down with water about 3 times a day
for about a week, to keep it cool while curing.
Sound about right?

Thanks
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Old 07-30-2010, 08:53 PM
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I can understand the floor on the interior being coated to prevent stains, but outside seems a waste, plus you get to re-coat it every 8 years .

What is the benefit lasting longer, concrete cracks, some from settling and in freezing weather the ground can rise and crack it that way. So what is the purpose or benefit of applying a coating on an exterior driveway sounds like a waste of money and time. Concrete pools and the areas around the pools are not sealed. I am all ears .
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Old 07-30-2010, 09:27 PM
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The primary purpose of an exterior sealant is to prevent surface scaling (I call it spalling). Other benefits are sealing the capillaries formed after curing, which will slow the damage caused by freezing, and protect the wire mesh or rebar reinforcing steel from corrosion by chlorides and salts used for melting ice that would seep down into the structure.

If your concrete contractor has had to do a significant amount of 'playing' with the surface finish, you will need to seal it. This happens when the customer wants a specific pattern or finish on the surface. Getting the finish to spec can sometimes be time consuming and the concrete only gives you so much time to do it. Take it to the limits, and you just weaken the adhesion of the top surface of the structure. Ever wonder why your neighbor's driveway looks all chewed up and the surface just seems to be chipping or flaking off? That is one of the possible reasons why.

I have also found that EucoGuard also keeps oil stains from setting - they just go away in about a week. The stuff really is amazing. A tad expensive though.
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Old 07-30-2010, 09:35 PM
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I have seen the scaling you speak of, always thought that was just a bad mix or poured in cold weather. Not a concrete guy myself, but I know more now thanks.
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Old 08-01-2010, 05:19 PM
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I ran a concrete crew from 02-07 for scab side jobs on weekend and evenings. I honestly did not even know that much of the in and outs of puddling, much less concrete in general before we got started in 02. Thanks to 5 skilled (from 10-30 year) union veterans who did the work, I learned a lot in a quick amount of time and a ton over those years. Basically I had the capital, skill at getting and organizing the jobs and the drive to organize my friends who talked about doing more on the side when the housing boom in the Midwest was in full swing.

We did residential jobs here in Minnesota, so every measure would could suggest to the customer from re-bar, fiber, and sealing was a must on every job quoted.

You can seal when you would like, but what the "pro's" suggested every time was to seal the slab or sidewalk "that day" of the pour, after the concrete had "set-up". The main reason for this is, this will be the cleanest the slab will ever be, minus high winds and loose dirt being in the vicinity of the pour. The next reason is it ensures the sealing will get done. The chances of it getting done 60 days after the pour start to get slim. The most important reason to seal concrete, like cucumber1949 stated, it protects your investment from huge to small stains, like oil and grilling grease, from soaking in. IMO the price of sealer is so cheap compared to the over all investment of the concrete project, it is just good measure to seal any slab across the country.


Most companies up this way will not even warranty their slabs unless it is sealed with in 24 hours of it being poured.

Good luck.

Last edited by 36ChevyCoupe; 08-01-2010 at 05:25 PM.
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Old 08-01-2010, 08:56 PM
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Thanks for the post, 36ChevyCoupe. Your advice gives me more
confidence in sealing my pour ASAP. I'll probably do it this week if
the weather permits. It started raining shortly after the pour and has
rained every day since, so no chance to put down a sealer yet.
The rain has been good for the concrete though, in keeping it
wet and cooled down.

My finisher said that a sealer applied soon after the pour would seal-in
moisture, allowing the concrete to cure slower and giving a stronger
finished product. He also left the forms in place for the same reason,
to keep the sides from drying out. My concrete knowledge is limited,
but that does make sense.....
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Old 10-05-2010, 08:15 PM
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Get a permanent penetrating sealer!

Yes, I like the way 36ChevyCoupe spells it out- if you really trust the finishing on the pour, get a permanent sealer down right away. I am a contractor/designer, and just started a company around a little known permanent concrete sealer called CreteDefender. I used the stuff on an outdoor shopping mall after finding the manufacturer online and the results have been amazing.

This stuff can go down at any time and still produce the same results. If your slab is new, you can get it down the next day after the pour has set. It is a great curing agent, and will harden the mix and densify it... as well as filling all the pores up to 5 inches deep while still allowing the concrete to breathe.

It has been used on airports, bridges, and dams-- and now I am trying to bring it out to the general population for driveways, sidewalks, and parking lots etc...
Most sealers are going to be just a coating on the top, and require recoating every few years... I figure this stuff is way worth it to put down on new or existing concrete to keep it protected permanently.

Salt, ice, and other chemical can break down a slab of concrete in a short time. If it is protected with a penetrating, reactive sealer, these enemies have no way in!

Check out CreteDefender.com and see if this is the product you are looking for to keep your concrete looking new... forever!
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Old 10-05-2010, 08:53 PM
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CreteDefender, be advised pushing your product in the forums is against the forum guidelines.

Vince
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Old 10-06-2010, 06:33 AM
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Hey, Vince--

Not trying to make a sale here... trying to give the best answer
I can to a question posed! I have been studying sealers and coatings
for concrete for a long time, and found the best solution to getting the
most out of your time and money... and getting the most out of your
concrete.

Don't want to offend-- looking to help! At this point in the life of my
business, I am not making a dime from any product sold. We are on
a mission to get this amazing stuff into the hands of homeowners and
storeowners and keep concrete landfills from swelling needlessly.

Just trying to give good advice- from personal experience.
That's what forums are for!
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Old 10-06-2010, 09:48 AM
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i poured a lot of concrete when I was younger and we always applied a curing agent/sealer on first class work..

Sam
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I have tried most all of it and now do what is known to work..
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Old 10-06-2010, 03:46 PM
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Does anyone know what stores like Walmart or Sam's Clubs use on their concrete floors?
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Old 10-06-2010, 06:45 PM
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If you live in any area that uses salt or other ice melt on the roads, you need to make sure you get the driveway sealed before the first snow. The salt will eat it up if it is not sealed and sealed good and regularly.

Trees
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