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Old 03-28-2005, 12:02 PM
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tuck & roll technique

Hi! Does anyone have any tricks or technique help in doing tuck and roll on my seats and door panels?

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Old 03-28-2005, 12:37 PM
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The interior guys know better than me, but from what I understand, it's all in how well you cut the foam....and getting the materisl all the way into the grooves.
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Old 03-28-2005, 07:52 PM
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What you see on TV where they cut grooves in the foam and then glue the material down into the cut grooves is not tuck and roll. True tuck and roll involves stitching the tuck and stuffing padding into the rolls. The way they do it on TV will not hold up over time in a vehicle that is used IMO. I had a 56 210 Chevy interior done in El Paso the summer of 69 (is that a song). Three of us who had 55 & 56 Chevies drove down and had all three done. I sold my 56 when I went into the Air Force and fifteen years later ran into the guy that bought the car from me. The interior was still holding up very well.

Vince
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Old 03-28-2005, 08:14 PM
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That does make more sense..................I saw that on TV,,,wasn't it Boyds show?...and thought that it seemed kind of flimsy.
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Old 03-28-2005, 09:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poncho62
That does make more sense..................I saw that on TV,,,wasn't it Boyds show?...and thought that it seemed kind of flimsy.
It was on their '57 Chevy Buildup. All they did was have foam backing with cut grooves into it (with a razor blade) and then sprayed some strong glue in there. Then they just laid the material over and with a slim stick of some sort squeezed it in the grooves. Looked like the real deal

And Vince, "I got my real fist six string, bought it at the five and dime. Played it 'till my fingers bled, back in the summer of '69" by Bryan Adams



Mike
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Old 03-29-2005, 05:56 AM
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I posted a thread a while back on this topic and got some amazing answers and a in depth how-to that was PM'd to me by Max Keith. I'll find the thread, dig up the PM's, compile it together and post it later when I get home from work.

It will be a whole step by step instruction!

Watch this space!

Rich
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Old 03-29-2005, 09:46 AM
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wow! thanks!

I am so glad that I read this before I got started. I did watch Boyd's show where they did the tuck and roll with glue. Why would they do that on such an expensive job? That seems half @** to me!! Hey does anyone have any advice on arm rests? My merc has these rests that are plastic on the bottom. Would you guys paint them and recover the tops or scrap them and buy new? I am afraid that the paint wouldn't stick and it would look like a cheap job.

Also, has anyone ever made custom arm rests in a crazy design like......I am thinking that I will have the machine shop make me some metal rests in the shape of a flame like a pic I have seen on here. Is that cheesy? Also, I have a beetle that I want to make the arm rests look like half of a daisy! Is this crazy?

I know you guys are probably thinking...why is this dumb chic on here asking us about girly ideas. LOL. I am actually pretty handy in the garage. Better than my brothers!!!! LOL

Any ideas are welcome!!!

Thanx-mercmama
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Old 03-29-2005, 10:56 AM
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Practice on the bug, and then do the good stuff on you hotrod.Sewing is a "Girls" job, anyways..................right?

Kidding, I like messing with upholstery.............not very good at it though.

Made these curtains for my golf cart...

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Old 03-29-2005, 11:10 AM
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As promised, here's the info I dug up on tuck 'n roll.

By the way, I have a '59 Beetle I'm either going to finish restoring or sell. I love them (but not nearly as much as my '54 Chevy) what year is yours?

Here's the thread I started called "tuck 'n roll how to guide?" You will find a lot of info in it.

http://hotrodders.com/forum/showthread.php?t=56783

And here's the instructions sent to me by Max Keith.

----------------------------

Upholstery 101:

Piping is called welt.
The panels that go around the bottom of the seat, like a skirt and up the sides and over the top of the seat, which are not part of the cushion (area you sit on) or the back ( part where your back rests) is called boxing.
The panel that goes on the back of the seat is just that, the back panel.

There are two kinds of welt. You can buy it in rolls, premade or make your own.
Making your own requires what is called a welt foot for your sewing machine.
welt is made by cutting your fabric diagonally across the grain of the fabric. If you are using vinyl, there are two kinds,a directional which has a woven backing on it an non-directional, which looks like someone just put a fine layer of loose fibers on it. Non-directional is easiest to make welt with as you dont hav to cut it diagonally across the fabric or what is called cutting on the bias.

Making welt is accomplished by cutting your fabric in a strip about 1 1/2 inches wide and as long as you can make it. You fold it over a medium such as 1/8th to 3/16ths in diameter, a good cotton line would work well. You can purchase welt cord, usually in a roll at most any sewing supply.
Then you sew the fabric around the cord. This is where the welt foot comes in as a welt foot has a channel in it to allow the cord and fabric to feed under the foot and the stitch is then much closer and makes the welt much tighter.

Making the panels.
Once you have the patterns for all your panels, then you want to of course cut them out. when you cut your panels, allow 1/4 inch minimum extra on all edges, that will be sewn, or turned under.


To attatch the boxing to your cushion, first sew the welt to the edge of your cushion.
After sewing the welt to the cushion ( same with the back), go take your fabric and fold it in half either direction and where that fold is at the edges, make a small v notch in your fabric and welt flap. Unfold the fabric and fold the other direction and repeat with the v notch. You may want to also do this at any sharp corners on your cushion and back.
Take your boxing and fold it in the middle, making a V notch at the point where that would correspond with the notch you made in your cushion or back. The reason for the notches are referance points to make sure your fabric is aligning properly. If you have your notches cut at the correct points, when you sew the fabrics together, all the v notches should match up with thier corresponding notch on the other piece.

After you have sewn the welt to the cushion, then take your boxing and using what are called T- pins and thats self explanitory, pin your boxing to the cushion, with the dressed sides facing each other. Then sew them together. Keep an eye on your tuck and roll to keep it from bunching over as you feed it through your machine. You might even go so far as to sew the ends of the tubes closed before sewing the welt onto it. This will greatly help in preventing any fold overs or puckers in your material.
You are correct in your assumption that the boxing requires no padding.
Since you are working with automotive seats, and probably using vinyl, you may cut your welt strips along the running yardage, which is the length of the roll rather than on the bias or across the roll.
This is particularly adviseable when making the welt for the front edge of your seats, so you dont have a splice.
Fabric generally comes in a roll, 54 inches wide, and is sold by the yard, which is the running measurement as you unroll it.
So a yard of fabric will be 54 inches by 36 inches. Since you work in metrics I presume, then it may well be sold in meters.
You will need to carefully measure your seats, to get all the lengths and widths needed. You and then take a piece of paper or papers and using these dimentions, figure out the most economical way of cutting the fabric and having the least amount of waste. Like putting a puzzle together.
If you are using fabric that has a pattern to it with centers, which are repeat points in the fabric, then you will have to lay out your patterns according to the centers, and this can make for a lot of scraps.
Hope this gets you started.
Once you read this over, since my text is a little disjointed, you may want to cut and paste this to the notebook program in your pc and edit it, then print it up if you have a printer available.
The alternative is to put it on a floppy or cd, so you can go back and referance it.
There are some really good books out there on doing automotive upholstery, and I would suggest you get one, as they are a lot more in detail than I can type, and will generally include pictures.

----------------------

Hope this helps, I'll be doing my own upholstery, I don't think it's a girlie job, and don't worry too much what other people think, rodding is about building something that reflects your individuality, so go for it! Even the half flower shaped armrests

Rich
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Old 04-07-2005, 11:37 PM
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Here is how I did it on hu truck and here is how it turned out. The pleats in the seats are sewn using a cloth backed foam sheet adn the panels and headliner are grooved and glued foam sheet.
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Old 04-08-2005, 06:19 AM
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I was tought to do tuck-n-roll a little different, as if I am reading this right you are cuting out all the squares and sewing them back together. We use to chalk our grid on the back of the vinyl, then cut diamonds at every intersection, by folding the vinyl and cutting the V. Then we sewed that fold the full length, double stiching each seam. The diamonds are to keep from breaking the needle when we sewed the intersecting seam. I sewed them all in one direction first then all the others, but don't know that that matters. Stuffing the squares makes sence, but I only did the sewing, as I could always hold such a strait line. And I did once help tie the buttons.

Yes glue sounds cheesy, but too they are doing some pretty amazing stuff with glue these days, I would like to see how it holds up before I say it is bad
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Old 04-16-2005, 08:47 AM
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Forget the glue

Forget the glue, been there, done that. glue has it's uses, but creating tuck n roll is not one of them. when forced into either paying 2300.00 for a seat and carpet re-do on my 32 roadster, i decided to learn enough upholstery to do it myself. spent 800.00 for materials and a "Mini Brute" machine, and have done three cars now. for myself. I have even turned down jobs, i am not that good. i would never want to be an upholsterer, takes too much time, but if you take your time, and are patient, and have a little guidance, you can do a job that is ok and looks good. just don't expect to win the okland roadster show, or something.
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