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Old 01-10-2007, 10:42 PM
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Uti?

hey guys, im currently in the navy and im gonna be out soon... Im lookin at goin to school to turn a wrench... ive narrowed down the choices to either wyo-tech or UTI? i hear good things about the Hot Rod U they put on... i was wantin to know if anybody had been through it and what they thought... im doin my research now before i drop $30k of hard earned Montgomery GI bill cash for school.... any comments are appreciated...

-ntx

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Old 01-10-2007, 11:02 PM
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How long have you been in the Navy? If you've got GI bill money why not try to go to school for mechanical engineering instead of just becoming a grease monkey. Or maybe get into an apprenticeship at one of the Naval Shipyards. I went to Wyo-tech and thought it was ok. I did learn quite a few things but I ended up going to work for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard through their apprentice program, I ended up learning a lot more and it didn't cost me anything. Plus I came out making enough money to support my myself and my hobbies. Depending on how long you've been in and what you did in the Navy, they'll often consider you ahead of other off the street applicants since you already have at least some experience.
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Old 01-11-2007, 01:46 AM
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Went straight from the Corps to WyoTech in Laramie. Automotive Tech & then Street Rod & Auto Custom. Great program, and it's only gotten better since. Like anything, a lot of ******* kids with parents with too much $, but you get out of it what you are willing to work for.

Now, almost 10 years later & I've got my own shop & build rigs for a living... Got a great gig at Land Rover straight out of WyoTech. Didn't take a couple of really cool jobs, including Factory Five (cobra kit car builders) due to family constraints.

Realize that it's EXPENSIVE & your GI Bill will do very little for you, as this is a short intensive schooling & GI Bill is limited to certain amount per month for # of months, regardless of school term or tuition costs, (ie $xxx.xx / mo, regardless of costs being $xx.00 per month or $xxxxx.xx per month).

Best of luck & thank you for your service to our country!

Hurrah.
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Old 01-11-2007, 09:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blazin72
How long have you been in the Navy? If you've got GI bill money why not try to go to school for mechanical engineering instead of just becoming a grease monkey. Or maybe get into an apprenticeship at one of the Naval Shipyards. I went to Wyo-tech and thought it was ok. I did learn quite a few things but I ended up going to work for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard through their apprentice program, I ended up learning a lot more and it didn't cost me anything. Plus I came out making enough money to support my myself and my hobbies. Depending on how long you've been in and what you did in the Navy, they'll often consider you ahead of other off the street applicants since you already have at least some experience.

ive been in almost 7yrs and i got 2 more to go... but as time shortens im lookin at what i wanna do when i get out... im actually workin on a mech. eng. degree but i wanna own my own shop one day when i get the experience... i was in bangor for a while and now im up here in CT... probably gonna be here a while...
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Old 01-11-2007, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by derm
Went straight from the Corps to WyoTech in Laramie. Automotive Tech & then Street Rod & Auto Custom. Great program, and it's only gotten better since. Like anything, a lot of ******* kids with parents with too much $, but you get out of it what you are willing to work for.

Now, almost 10 years later & I've got my own shop & build rigs for a living... Got a great gig at Land Rover straight out of WyoTech. Didn't take a couple of really cool jobs, including Factory Five (cobra kit car builders) due to family constraints.

Realize that it's EXPENSIVE & your GI Bill will do very little for you, as this is a short intensive schooling & GI Bill is limited to certain amount per month for # of months, regardless of school term or tuition costs, (ie $xxx.xx / mo, regardless of costs being $xx.00 per month or $xxxxx.xx per month).

Best of luck & thank you for your service to our country!

Hurrah.
yeah i figured with the punk kids and all the money... but kinda like you implied im not there to make friends im there to learn to turn a wrench better than i do now...lol... i know aboutt he cost... UTI is 30k... and i have to get student loans... i plan on paying those off with the gi bill....i also have navy college fund... puts me at about 50k for schooling... but like you i wanna own my own place someday... how well did u like the programs? and ty as well for serving...semper fortis
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Old 01-11-2007, 10:59 AM
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I dunno.. I personally don't see all the hype with UTI. Only thing I see useful there is the Diesal program because we don't have one around here but still, 30k is alottttt of money.
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Old 01-11-2007, 12:23 PM
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Besides swabbing decks, chipping and painting, what do you get to do for the canoe club?
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Old 01-12-2007, 01:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ntx_gearhead
but like you i wanna own my own place someday... how well did u like the programs?
The thing that impressed me most about WyoTech in Laramie was that the instructors were, with rare exception, very passionate about their jobs, and their facets of the industry.

As a long-time hot rodder wannabe, I'd done the basics from tuneups to headers, lots of bolt in applications and upgrades (ie: tranny swaps, not rebuilds, or custom mounted applications / custom modifications), so I had a good handle on tools & how to research and figure things out.

The basic Automotive Technology course was too oriented toward working in a modern dealership for me, although it was very helpful when my first gig was as a mechanic at a Land Rover Dealership in Denver. Lots of principle and theory and application on various injection systems and computer controlled systems, which is essential for working on modern vehicles, but pretty useless on all my pre-1980 projects (which is what I try to stay with by preference).

The transmissions class was excellent, as was the basic suspension class (alignments & chassis / suspension designs on everything from Model A's to C5 corvettes and 1-ton trucks). Hands on 727 rebuild, modern transaxle R&R & rebuild, axles, etc, along with modification and dyno testing.

The real goal, and the fun, came in the Street Rod & Auto Custom class. Basically, you either focus on body or 'other'. I'm an other guy, and spent the majority of my time in engine building and chassis design. You have to do some of both focuses, but will definately pursue one to a much greater extent. The many classroom hours on multi-stage paint jobs, etc, were lost on me, as I just don't get into that.

You'll gain a bunch of knowedge in the Auto Tech program, but mostly just an 'outline', so too speak, that you'll fill in when you focus on one area or another of the industry. You'll come out with a great general knowledge and the basics needed to pursue any facet further. I still have 6 2.5" binders of handouts and notes that I refer to on occasion, especially when helping out a friend with a 'modern' rig.

If it hasn't changed too much, you'll want to bring a project with you to Street Rod & Auto Custom (or Hot Rod U), along with a good plan for that project and a budget for parts and materials. I did not, and ended up working on a lot of fellow students' & local racers' projects (built 10-pt cage for a '71 Nova, tubbed a '57 Chevy, built all mounts for Hemi powertrain in a '47 Dodge, shaved a '70 C10, turned 4 door Caprice into a long-doored 2-door, custom tube headers, 4-link and girdled 9", etc, etc.) Could have gotten a lot done on a project of my own, with some other student help, and under watchful helpful eyes, if I'd known ahead of time.

Head Instructor of SR&AC was building a Mach I for the Silver State Classic. 7 lb hammer formed aluminum dash, 427 Clevor, tube chassis, etc, etc. So the passion came from the top and could be seen throughout.

Hope that helps. Best of luck!
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Old 01-12-2007, 02:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larryblack
Besides swabbing decks, chipping and painting, what do you get to do for the canoe club?

i was driving a submarine for 4 yrs... now im goin thru electronics tech school (yawn) and ill probably be an instructor after that
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Old 01-12-2007, 03:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by derm
The thing that impressed me most about WyoTech in Laramie was that the instructors were, with rare exception, very passionate about their jobs, and their facets of the industry.

As a long-time hot rodder wannabe, I'd done the basics from tuneups to headers, lots of bolt in applications and upgrades (ie: tranny swaps, not rebuilds, or custom mounted applications / custom modifications), so I had a good handle on tools & how to research and figure things out.

The basic Automotive Technology course was too oriented toward working in a modern dealership for me, although it was very helpful when my first gig was as a mechanic at a Land Rover Dealership in Denver. Lots of principle and theory and application on various injection systems and computer controlled systems, which is essential for working on modern vehicles, but pretty useless on all my pre-1980 projects (which is what I try to stay with by preference).

The transmissions class was excellent, as was the basic suspension class (alignments & chassis / suspension designs on everything from Model A's to C5 corvettes and 1-ton trucks). Hands on 727 rebuild, modern transaxle R&R & rebuild, axles, etc, along with modification and dyno testing.

The real goal, and the fun, came in the Street Rod & Auto Custom class. Basically, you either focus on body or 'other'. I'm an other guy, and spent the majority of my time in engine building and chassis design. You have to do some of both focuses, but will definately pursue one to a much greater extent. The many classroom hours on multi-stage paint jobs, etc, were lost on me, as I just don't get into that.

You'll gain a bunch of knowedge in the Auto Tech program, but mostly just an 'outline', so too speak, that you'll fill in when you focus on one area or another of the industry. You'll come out with a great general knowledge and the basics needed to pursue any facet further. I still have 6 2.5" binders of handouts and notes that I refer to on occasion, especially when helping out a friend with a 'modern' rig.

If it hasn't changed too much, you'll want to bring a project with you to Street Rod & Auto Custom (or Hot Rod U), along with a good plan for that project and a budget for parts and materials. I did not, and ended up working on a lot of fellow students' & local racers' projects (built 10-pt cage for a '71 Nova, tubbed a '57 Chevy, built all mounts for Hemi powertrain in a '47 Dodge, shaved a '70 C10, turned 4 door Caprice into a long-doored 2-door, custom tube headers, 4-link and girdled 9", etc, etc.) Could have gotten a lot done on a project of my own, with some other student help, and under watchful helpful eyes, if I'd known ahead of time.

Head Instructor of SR&AC was building a Mach I for the Silver State Classic. 7 lb hammer formed aluminum dash, 427 Clevor, tube chassis, etc, etc. So the passion came from the top and could be seen throughout.

Hope that helps. Best of luck!

when you got to the hot rod and custom part is there a way you could go through both parts in depth... cause my original passion is engines and making horsepower and torque... but id really like to learn how to do bodywork and paint as a way of makin money till i get my own shop up and running... and about how much was tuition and books when u were finished? thanks for the help!
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Old 01-08-2008, 12:41 PM
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Take a look at Fab School also.
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Old 01-09-2008, 11:58 PM
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Uti

Why UTI or Wyo Tech?

I teach Auto Tech at a a two year community college in North Dakota. I am always curious as to why students want to spend over twice as much for a short program that tries to cram your education at such a fast pace. I realize some students don't want to sit in a school for a full two years but I just don't get it. I have had perspective students say they are going to Wyo tech so they work for two years after high school to save the money to go, where is the advantage? I then see the same student working right next to my graduates at the dealership making the same money. I would shop around and consider a high quality two year NATEF certified auto tech program.

The other thing that bothers me is the push for the high performance programs. Yes, they would be fun to go to and learn about this side of the automotive industry and the flash and excitement lures students into the program, but, how many find jobs in this area? I realize this is a more popular area in a more populated state than ND, but I assume that there are not that many jobs out there.

Just some food for thought.

Rick
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Old 01-10-2008, 06:28 PM
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ntx... id go wyo-tech in my industry ,heavy deisal and automotive, uti has a popular acronym and for due cause ill share it with you
UTI
un,trained,ignorance
un trained idiots
a free tool box(which you pay for in the end) and book smarts all you'll get
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Old 01-12-2008, 06:22 AM
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Im with Ricky Rocket, why spend that kind of money on a School that has just a name. I go to Greenville Tech in south Carolina and did the GM program. I pay less than 2,000 a semester, and i turn wrenches around a UTI student, not bashing them. Doesnt really take a school to turn you into a gearhead, it takes your ability to learn the trade and years of experience. Never going to learn by watching and reading the books all ways either. Putting transmissions in cars in the, dirt with no help, using all three hands to put that one bell housing bolt in that is just cutting your *** because you got trans fluid running down your arm into arm pit, and its 110 stinkin degrees out, and you finally get it in, and you reach for the next bolt and oh crap, you buried them in the dirt while scramming around. School really helps, but you cant get that kind of education at school.
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Old 01-12-2008, 08:55 AM
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You have at least a couple years in the military yet, why not find a good shop and volunteer your time for the learning experience. Or maybe a part time job. Hit the library and learn the technical written side to help apply to the practical side. Seven years eh? You should already be a first class looking at chief some time soon. Sub pay, base pay and all the rest - are your sure you want to give up the $? Your almost 1/2 done to having some benefits for the rest of your life. Take those years and learn the trade, save some good money. On your last shore duty, start a small business and build your client base. When you get out then you will have something already built to walk into without sacrificing.

Dutch
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