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Old 05-01-2012, 06:49 PM
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Walking the lenght of the car when shooting metallic basecoat

Im planning on shooting my car for the first time this week. For over a year Ive gathered up information online and on this site on tips etc.. that have come very very helpful. As Ive been watching many many videos with spraying techniques its all becoming to come together but noticed two things that I wasnt planing on doing;

- Walking the length of the car when shooting the base.. Is this really necessary. I know that if I dont most likely I will get a heavier finish around the end of the doors, panels, and fenders. I seem to do a lot better when I spray 4-5 foot sections at a time.

- I notice some painters do not release the trigger when the come to an end of a panel. I always release when I get to the end (when shooting primer and sealer) Is there a good reason why they dont release?

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Old 05-01-2012, 07:20 PM
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I think you will find they are releasing the trigger to the point paint ceases to flow but air is still triggered. This prevents the paint from blobing. If you don't release the trigger you will definitely end up with too much paint at the end of your struck.
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Old 05-01-2012, 11:48 PM
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Here is a "Basics of Basics" I wrote on the subject. http://www.autobodystore.com/ms25.shtml

It shows exactly how to get an evan film build over the entire car. In the real world I see no reason to walk the length of the car. I have done it, but to tell you the truth I don't remember why, I think to just see if I could.

I am no custom painter, but maybe with candies it would be a good idea. But still, the method I lay out in my "Basics" would work just fine with a candy I would think.

Brian
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Old 05-02-2012, 04:58 AM
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For a even pass without walking the car, try vertical passes.
That works even better, it keeps a wet edge and makes
overlaps more consistant. Just turn the air cap 90 degrees
and go vertical
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Old 05-02-2012, 06:11 AM
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I've always found to help get a even layer on a hard to control metallic job or say a candy. What I do is never have my spray pattern or stop it in the same spot twice. If you go back and froth on your first coat go up and down on the next. If you stop your spray pattern at the ends of your panels stop in the middle on the next.
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Old 05-02-2012, 09:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swvalcon
I've always found to help get a even layer on a hard to control metallic job or say a candy. What I do is never have my spray pattern or stop it in the same spot twice. If you go back and froth on your first coat go up and down on the next. If you stop your spray pattern at the ends of your panels stop in the middle on the next.
This is the way i have seen this done since I was a kid, and that was a looong time ago!
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Old 05-02-2012, 10:12 AM
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I'm with SWValcon on this one. I rotate my pattern 45 degrees each pass. horizontal first pass, up and to the right second pass and then go 90 degrees to up and left on the third pass. I then do a drop coat to make certain I don't have any mottling or tiger stripes. I also never stop at the edge of a panel, especially door openings. I'm not the painter I believe MartinSR to be so I have my crutches such as I just described to reduce my opportunity to screw up my work. MartinSR is one of the members on here who has taught me far more than he realizes he's taught.
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Old 05-02-2012, 10:19 AM
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Thank you so much for the kind words.

Brian
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