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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 05-06-2013, 07:34 AM
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There's a train museum in Duluth MN that houses the last steam emgine to haul iron ore from the quarrys to the ore docks in Duluth. It is so long, it has 2 engines and 16 drive wheels under 1 huge boiler. The front engine being able to articulate to navigate the bends in the track !!

Link to musuem website. Scroll down near the bottom for Engine #227

Steam Locomotives

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 05-06-2013, 07:43 AM
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Originally Posted by John long View Post
The Tennessee Valley Raiload Musium runs an Old Baldwin steam locamotive on local excursions. One of the cool things they do is allow 2 people at a time to purchase cab passes and ride in the locamotive with the fireman and engineer. My son in law and I did that a few years ago. It was really a special experience. If any of you guys get to Chattanooga I highly recommend it.

John
That sounds like a blast!

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Old 05-06-2013, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Dave57210 View Post
A couple of folks have PM'd me to ask about "what's an F7?" and What do the numbers mean when you say 4-8-2 etc.

4 leading wheels 2 each side (small ones right behind the so-called cow-catcher). These actually steer the locomotive around corners

8 Drive wheels

2 more small ones under the cab

The truly humongous ones were the Union Pacific Big Boys which were 4-8-8 4 and the Challengers which were 4-6-6-4 with two sets of pistons/drivers per side.

For a pic of an F7, check out this Wikipedia: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
/wiki/EMD_F7

and for a pic of the Mountain Class that pulled passenger trains when I was a little munchkin : CN U-1-f - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

And for those who wondered about my Dad's trailer

When I was growing up, the town had no services such as welders, etc, so my dad went to the nearby town of Roseau, Minnesota to have a trailer built. The guy who did it was experimenting with self-propelled toboggans like the ones he had heard that Armand Bombardier was making in Quebec. He later went into production of them, under the name Polaris. Polaris Snowmobiles, Polaris ATVs and Victory Motorcycles are the result - all "descendents of" my dad's utility trailer which I now own.

WILD!

Brian
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 05-06-2013, 07:46 AM
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The California Railroad museum has some great displays as well with a few "Show car" quality restorations, CRAZY good restorations on these big monsters. That #227 reminds me of one there that is HUGE, don't know the particulars but it is a monster.







California State Railroad Museum

Brian
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Old 05-06-2013, 08:19 AM
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If any of you gentlemen travel here's a couple of places to check out.
Alberta Prairie Railway - Alberta Steam Train Tourist Attraction
If you go then wave at my b/l and sister. The train goes past their farm. LOL!!
Reynolds-Alberta Museum
Toured their warehouse a few years ago. THey have the world's largest steam driven steel wheeled tractor there. And a whole lot more. A day well spent!
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Old 05-06-2013, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
The California Railroad museum has some great displays as well with a few "Show car" quality restorations, CRAZY good restorations on these big monsters. That #227 reminds me of one there that is HUGE, don't know the particulars but it is a monster.







California State Railroad Museum

Brian
Old 9294 is one of the last steam engine built in the USA and is the last steamer bought by Southern Pacific. It's a cab forward engine user to traverse the Sierra Nevada Mountains. It has a forward cab so as the engineer could see ahead while going through the long snow sheds around Donner Pass. The sheds would fill with smoke and a rear mounted cab offered no visibility. She is the last of her kind.

BB

Yeah I know the pic is not the same engine but it gives you a better idea of the configuration.
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 05-06-2013, 08:44 AM
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Ahhhhh, yes, you know your engines!

Brian
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Old 05-06-2013, 09:55 AM
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Steam Engines.............

When i was a young-un,(early 1940 s) we,My mother and i, took the train from pittsburg Pa,To wellsburg ,Wva,to visit my grandmother.we went on a steam engined train. (coal burning) how well I remember the soot,INSIDE the paqssenger cars.My uncle was a fireman for the PRR,(coal pitcher) I Loved the way the engine would belch steam when getting underway.Im afraid those days are gone forever...
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Old 05-06-2013, 09:56 AM
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I don't know what it is about a steam engine that is so fascinating. How in the world can those 8 steel wheels on 2 steel tracks have enough traction to pull 100 loaded freight cars up an incline? How can a boiler full of water and some coal produce that kind of raw power?

When I was in the Navy in 1965 I seved on the USS Northampton. She was a cruiser that was 667 feet long. More than 2 football fields. She was powered by 4 steam turbins and could run 37 Knots under full power. That is over 40 mph. Steam power just never ceases to amaze me.

John
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Old 05-07-2013, 07:46 AM
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Sand! John!!
THey use a little sand sprayed in front of the traction wheels. At least on the new ones and likely on the old too.
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Old 05-07-2013, 08:25 AM
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This was one of the things I learned from my neighbor next door, sand! I was up at the Skunk train working and came back home going next door to tell Scotty about this 1932 something (forget the name) engine that was there and mentioned the sand hoppers out front and he explained it all to me. They were used a lot of course where he was working in the snow of the Sierras.

It's weird, I am using the wrong terminology or something but I can't find a photo of one. This engine had big containers with a funnel bottom on them mounted one sides of the front for sand, but I'll be damned if I can find a photo.

Brian
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Old 05-07-2013, 08:30 AM
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If any of you guys are ever around the SF bay area up in Berkeley at Tilden Park there is a Steam train, a REAL steam train for the "kids" to ride on. And it doesn't go around in a circle it goes out along the hills overlooking the SF bay. It is a heck of a good little ride and a blast!



Tilden Regional Park

They also have a bunch of tracks there ranging from about 3/4" wide to a foot or so that are used my a steam engine modelers club. It's a sight to see and if you are in the area, why not?

Brian
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Old 05-07-2013, 08:56 AM
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And the sand made a huge difference. We had an old Elco where I worked. We used it to load slate sulphur into rail cars, 50 cars in a string. 150 tons per car. We would get stuck in the switches if we weren't carefull. Put a little sand down and off we went.
I watched a hogshead lay down a little sand and push 6000 tons of loaded cars 10 feet down the line. Brakes where all locked. Wheels just skidding. Big power, big traction.
The newer loco's use air to push (actually syphon) sand while the old steam loco's used steam.
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 05-07-2013, 10:19 AM
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Here's a couple of pics of sanders including a different style from Hawaii.


BB
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Old 05-07-2013, 10:46 AM
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I really love the transition time between conventional styled locomotives and steam streamliners. !930's and forties. Very much art deco. Of course these beauties pulled passengers. The rolling stock followed suite.
Aren't they wonderful?

BB
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