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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 07-05-2014, 12:57 AM
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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
 
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That's why I called it a "Wire feed" because my "MIG" isn't even a MIG because the gas I am using is 75/25 with CO2 an "active" gas which isn't Inert either!

Brian

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Old 07-05-2014, 07:30 AM
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What makes CO2 an active gas for welding?


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Old 07-05-2014, 08:49 AM
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CO2 mixes with the weld while Argon doesn't.

Brian
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Old 07-05-2014, 02:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizer View Post
What makes CO2 an active gas for welding?


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The CO2 molecule splits under heat, the oxygen (O2) is reactive and burns away some impurities(oil, light rust and corrosion) while the carbon (C) mixes with the metal and adds hardness. (ever notice welds are harder than surrounding sheetmetal?)

I prefer to use 95/5 (Argon/CO2) on clean metal, it lays down a flatter, more spread out bead that requires less grinding and doesn't burn through as easy...but material has to be rust free and clean. Cost more also, but I think well worth it. There are similar 96/4 and 92/8 mixes also available, 96/4 is Argon/O2 IIRC.
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Old 07-07-2014, 12:31 PM
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i built most of truk and all the bed mods with a fluxcore welder, burn thru can be frustrating to say the least
a couple of ways to control burn thru:

easiest is to use a backer strip if possible.
cut a 1 inch wide strip of metal, clamp or screw it half and half on the base metal and tack it to the base metal
then fit your panel and tack, tack, tack. the strip will absorb a lot of the heat from the tacks
some times i use the backer strip with a double set of screws to hold both panels in place
after welding the panels together the backer strip will come out with a little work

2nd choice is just to tack the panels together as the op has stated, use smallest tacks as possible to avoid burn thru
keep a wet rag to quench the tacks and start the next series of tacks on the first set of tack welds
the first set of taciks absorbs the heat better than a gap

fluxcore is not the easiest to weld thin metal with, but for 12 ga thru 3/8'' it works very well
sheet metal, boxed frame, mustII x-member and all sorts of brackets on truk were done very well
most of the time i grind welds for painting; mig and fluxcore. fluxcore just takes a bit more to clean up

my welder, lincoln weldpak 100 is always ready and has never run out of gas
as stated you can't use mig outside for welding and it will go up a ladder or in a manlift for high work

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Old 07-07-2014, 12:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ericnova72 View Post
The CO2 molecule splits under heat, the oxygen (O2) is reactive and burns away some impurities(oil, light rust and corrosion) while the carbon (C) mixes with the metal and adds hardness. (ever notice welds are harder than surrounding sheetmetal?)

I prefer to use 95/5 (Argon/CO2) on clean metal, it lays down a flatter, more spread out bead that requires less grinding and doesn't burn through as easy...but material has to be rust free and clean. Cost more also, but I think well worth it. There are similar 96/4 and 92/8 mixes also available, 96/4 is Argon/O2 IIRC.
good info ericnova72 also explains why we have 95/5 in the carbon metal welder and pure argon for ss mig and tig at the shop
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Old 07-07-2014, 06:56 PM
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I have to admit, life is too short, flux wire feeds are for welding fences in the wind.

Brian
Well. not really, but your point is well taken.

Everything has its place, and if you are talking sheet metal gauges, FCAW (flux core arc welding) isn't what you want to use.

FCAW needs backing, and it doesn't lend itself to thicknesses thinner than about 3/16" ideally, but it can be used on sheet metal as thin as 10 ga. with limited success if the weld joint has backing (no open root welding).

GMAW (gas metal arc welding) is what you should be using for body panel welding, as others have already stated, using shielding gas & 0.023 wire.

GTAW (gas tungsten arc welding) aka TIG welding would also be another excellent welding process for sheet metal.

I have worked at a production welding and fabrication shops that built pressure vessels ranging from 3/16" to 6" thick since the early 1980's. Typically for the vessels we used GMAW for open root joints, then FCAW for 2 or 3 passes and then if the weld joint position permitted the fill and cap welds would be machine welded using SAW (submerged arc welding). We always used GMAW for sheet metal weldments, and only used GTAW for very thin, delicate components.

Again, this was a production shop where time was money and we tried to use the most efficient process we could to get the job done as quickly as possible, yet still produce good sound weldments.

There are many great welding processes, but all have their limits.

Hope that helps.

John

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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 07-12-2014, 11:37 PM
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. Just bought my first automatic helmet today... and cheap $164 H.F. 170 amp MIG welder last week to go with my old stick and gas welders... used an Eastwood stitch weld gun before for sheet metal, but got tired of denting/bending thin sheet metal when chipping slag off... also, standard 1/16 rods didn't seem to work well with it, needed Eastwood 1/16 stitch rods... helmet is solar cell powered, can it only be used outdoors or does it store power? Was surprised it said not for gas or TIG welding. I suppose gas has wrong light qualities, but what's the deal with TIG? Need to pick up some .023 S.S. wire and gas yet...
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Old 07-13-2014, 01:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BuzzLOL View Post
. Just bought my first automatic helmet today... and cheap $164 H.F. 170 amp MIG welder last week to go with my old stick and gas welders... used an Eastwood stitch weld gun before for sheet metal, but got tired of denting/bending thin sheet metal when chipping slag off... also, standard 1/16 rods didn't seem to work well with it, needed Eastwood 1/16 stitch rods... helmet is solar cell powered, can it only be used outdoors or does it store power? Was surprised it said not for gas or TIG welding. I suppose gas has wrong light qualities, but what's the deal with TIG? Need to pick up some .023 S.S. wire and gas yet...
Not sure on your helmet and TIG welding, should be enough light from the arc to trigger it. Some can be a bit "trippy" on very low amp TIG welding on really thin stuff, like paper thin .015".

Oxyfuel/Acetylene won't trip it however, so it's no good for that...and too dark anyway if it would trip.

The "Solar cell power" will take light from the welding arc for a power source, just like a solar cell calculator, and trip dark just fine...helmet I use is the same type, might sit for a week or several and not get used, so I didn't want a battery involved to just have it run down when I needed it.
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Old 07-13-2014, 02:53 AM
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. Thank you, Eric... Getting solar power light from the arc didn't seem practical... but, yes, come to think of it, it will sunburn us far faster than the sun does...
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Old 07-13-2014, 08:36 AM
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Arc fender rod ?

60 years ago when I was in high school metal shop I could buy arc welding rod they called fender rod. I don't remember the size but it was very small and the supplier said the flux coating contained a lot of iron powder what would become part of the weld and not as likely to burn thru. My step son's 46 chevy pickup fenders have some welds that have about a 1/4 bead and look like the ones some one could have used that rod. With the popularity of Mig welders I don't know if they still make it. and it is not the prefered method . I could also buy arc bumper rod. a stainless steel alloy they sold to weld up crackes in bumpers. And we used a carbon arc torch to heat castings and for brazing. And I have an old Air -Arc torch for cutting that I don't use.
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Old 07-13-2014, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ericnova72 View Post
The "Solar cell power" will take light from the welding arc for a power source, just like a solar cell calculator, and trip dark just fine...helmet I use is the same type, might sit for a week or several and not get used, so I didn't want a battery involved to just have it run down when I needed it.
my home harbor fright helmet doesn't get used often much any more
if i don't use it for a couple eight months it will flash me, i lay it out in the sun for a few hrs
problem solved

all in all, you can't beat the harbor fright welding helmets
on my 2nd home helmet in 10 yrs, i broke the headband connector when a piece of angle fell on it
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Old 07-13-2014, 01:28 PM
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I think my HF helmet is solar too, and now that I think about it it has never been outside. I've had the helmet for five years now and it's always worked great. Have used it for a lot of welding.


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